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I have a 5 year old male dog who was recently diagnosed by my vet with pannus. The pannus was caught on a routine check up just before he was slated to breed. Due to this news I am skeptical to go ahead with breeding because from my understanding pannus can be genetic.?. I am truly only breeding him because he is an amazing dog with great temperament drive and up until this fantastic health and I am all about bettering the breed! So I suppose I am writing this to get some opinions on what to do??? please and thank you!
 

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I would not breed him.
 

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I'm sure he is an amazing dog - so many are! But the responsible thing to do, is not breed him. As you said, this is a genetic issue that you don't want to pass on if you are serious about bettering the breed.

And who would breed their bitch to a male that has Pannus? Who would want puppies from a male that has a Genetic health condition? It just doesn't make sense to breed him.
I'm glad you are thinking about this in a clear, logical way. So many people just decide to breed based on emotion, yet there is so much more to breeding than just loving your dog -

Breeders that I consider responsible are those who prove their dogs breed worthiness through extensive titling (in work-related venues for a working dog), and show great self-discipline and clear-headedness when it comes to evaluating potential health problems in their dogs, or their dogs' lines. The good breeders are the ones that can say no.
 

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I'll put it this way, I wouldn't purchase a puppy if I knew either of the parents had Pannus.
 
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Pannus can also be caused by environment, elevations(altitude) or areas with very extreme sun. I don't think I'd breed to a stud afflicted, but would look at the bigger picture...Onyx has a sister with it, it is manageable and no other littermates or relatives have it. I think there is more to Pannus than genetics
 

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My Izzy (has passed on) didn't get pannus until she was 5 years old.
She was on meds for 7 years to stop it from getting worse.

My doctor said it is a autoimmune disease. If it's genetic, is there any test for this????
 

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Pannus can also be caused by environment, elevations(altitude) or areas with very extreme sun. I don't think I'd breed to a stud afflicted, but would look at the bigger picture...Onyx has a sister with it, it is manageable and no other littermates or relatives have it. I think there is more to Pannus than genetics
I have a 5 year old male dog who was recently diagnosed by my vet with pannus. The pannus was caught on a routine check up just before he was slated to breed. Due to this news I am skeptical to go ahead with breeding because from my understanding pannus can be genetic.?. I am truly only breeding him because he is an amazing dog with great temperament drive and up until this fantastic health and I am all about bettering the breed! So I suppose I am writing this to get some opinions on what to do??? please and thank you!
That is a tough call. The first reaction would be no to breeding, but Pannus effects the breed so basically in my opinion, is hereditary to any shepherd. It seems the environment such as high altitudes or areas with high UV exposure are the triggers for developing the disease. Correct me if I am wrong, but I am not aware of any clear cut evidence that a puppy from a stud with pannus that was kept at high altitude with high UV exposure would have a greater chance of developing pannus than from a stud that currently did not have the disease. Pannus usually occurs in older dogs which any healthy stud could develop later in life, especially if they were kept in the contributing environments.
 

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5year old thread, in case you didn't notice. 🙂
 

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Just to add to this "oldie" --- whether I would breed the dog would depend on so much else. I've had one dog with several health issues but she was such that I would take another like her health problems and all because of her work ethic, her game attitude, her quick learning. Her brain, her attitude --- sign me up for another.
 

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Then you are someone who should NOT be breeding dogs!
To get back to the original topic of the thread, pannus is a serious issue - treatment sometimes fails. I just found out the sire of my female has gone almost completely blind from it! 😢
 

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As for panus specifically, I would lean towards not breeding a dog with it. It’s starting to become a bigger issue in the breed and something people should be actively working to reduce. Breeding with health issues in general, I would consider how serious is the issue, how it affects their working ability and day to day living, how hard it is to manage, how likely are the puppies to have it and how hard is it to breed away from.
 

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That is a tough call. The first reaction would be no to breeding, but Pannus effects the breed so basically in my opinion, is hereditary to any shepherd. It seems the environment such as high altitudes or areas with high UV exposure are the triggers for developing the disease. Correct me if I am wrong, but I am not aware of any clear cut evidence that a puppy from a stud with pannus that was kept at high altitude with high UV exposure would have a greater chance of developing pannus than from a stud that currently did not have the disease. Pannus usually occurs in older dogs which any healthy stud could develop later in life, especially if they were kept in the contributing environments.
I realize it’s an old post, however, I just feel the need to respond to some of the points made here for any others that may access this post for info on Pannus - that’s how I ended up here. My boy was diagnosed a few months back - he had just turned 3, so no, it’s not just an older dogs disease. We live in Duluth, MN at an altitude of 800 ft above sea level, so no, it doesn’t require high altitude to manifest itself. And we certainly could not be classified as a “sunshine paradise”, so no, even cloudy areas produce Pannus affected dogs. It’s genetics - pure and simple.
 

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I realize it’s an old post, however, I just feel the need to respond to some of the points made here for any others that may access this post for info on Pannus - that’s how I ended up here. My boy was diagnosed a few months back - he had just turned 3, so no, it’s not just an older dogs disease. We live in Duluth, MN at an altitude of 800 ft above sea level, so no, it doesn’t require high altitude to manifest itself. And we certainly could not be classified as a “sunshine paradise”, so no, even cloudy areas produce Pannus affected dogs. It’s genetics - pure and simple.
 

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3 years old is time to start watching for pannus. Are the parents of your boy effected with pannus? If not, it is one of the things that effect the breed. Is your boy outside a lot? High UV can be present at any altitude regardless of clouds. Be sure to do daily eye drops of Prednisol, limit high UV exposure, and he should be fine. There are goggles for dogs to protect their eyes from UV, but may require training to get the dog use to them.
 

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Pannus blindsided us and our 2 yr old GSD. She was purchased from a very reputable breeder in Toronto that bred his female with Toronto area studs from other highly rated breeders. We looked at hips and elbows, choosing dogs with German grandparents (that rate joints) with the highest ranked joints etc etc. There was never any mention of pannus and wasn't on our radar. Now it was caught very early as she injured her eye doing some agility training and it's only very very small.... but very worrying that she could be blind in 5 years???

Honestly, if I was ever to buy another GSD... not sure as pannus is so widespread (but we really love our GSD). I would have to get Pannus checked somehow perhaps asking the breeder to pull back the eyelids of mom and Dad and physically check them out myself. It's actually that easy as at the start it hides sometimes just out of view on breeding age dogs so I've been told (vet) but being what it is that really doesn't guarantee anything.

Anyway, we have goggles and use drops daily to get a jump on things but very annoying as we were planning on breeding her..... she has perfect joints, is deep red and smart.

Called the breeders that have her lineage and they were dumbstruck that we would have pannus in our dog???? but there is that fine line between being reputable and losing your shirt if word got out that it's their genetics versus me being irresponsible and walking her during the day??
 

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Anyway, we have goggles and use drops daily to get a jump on things but very annoying as we were planning on breeding her..... she has perfect joints, is deep red and smart.

Called the breeders that have her lineage and they were dumbstruck that we would have pannus in our dog???? but there is that fine line between being reputable and losing your shirt if word got out that it's their genetics versus me being irresponsible and walking her during the day??
If your only other criteria for breeding your dog was "perfect joints, is deep red and smart", then I would call that even more irresponsible.

Without working ability, you have nothing.
 
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