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I'm not sure it does... I believe the panda gene is the same as black and tan, black, or sable... just a colour. Just not ideal in terms of the German Shepherd standard and very rare - therefore considered a 'fault'. That's my understanding, anyway. :D
 

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Don't particularly like the name they assigned - but Panda colour was supposedly a spontaneous mutation .
My friend Linda Shaw studied this white spotting penetrance - Shawlein Fine Art & Purebred German Shepherd Dogs

You can re-visit this topic previously discussed here (with fewer questions marks) http://www.germanshepherds.com/forum/genetic-issues/175584-panda-shepherd-5.html

speaking with my biologist friend nothing in DNA ever goes away- it keeps getting put further and further back into storage , but it is still there . If you go into the von Stephanitz books and have a look there are working herding dogs that pretty much look like the Panda type -- look all the world like a GSD but for colour .

Purebred is a rather new concept that arose and created new breeds of dogs at the same time in history, more or less - and those breeds also are having strange things happen such as long haired Dobermann . Strange because we have forgotten about the animals which input genetic information . The DNA never goes away .

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Shawlein Fine Art & Purebred German Shepherd Dogs

^ That seems to be the resource most folks will send you to for the 'overview' of the types of GSDs. Here's a quote on the Panda Shepherd:

"Panda Shepherd. Currently one family of AKC registered GSDs of German lines, that shows a new, spontaneous mutation, the first ever recorded in dogs, for white spotting that exhibits an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance, consistenct with the action of a single gene acting with full penetrance. This family shows uniformly good structure and sound temperament, no discernible health affects, and is pursuing separate breed status. The unique genetics of this race have been studied at the University of California, Center for Veterinary Genetics, School of Veterinary Medicine."

EDIT: Oops! Ninja posters got to it before me! :)
 

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Interesting....I have to admit, some of them are striking! Is it as frowned upon by the GSD community to breed for this color mutation as it is, say, to breed for only long coats or over sized dogs since this color mutation doesnt seem to affect the health of the dog?



Shawlein Fine Art & Purebred German Shepherd Dogs

^ That seems to be the resource most folks will send you to for the 'overview' of the types of GSDs. Here's a quote on the Panda Shepherd:

"Panda Shepherd. Currently one family of AKC registered GSDs of German lines, that shows a new, spontaneous mutation, the first ever recorded in dogs, for white spotting that exhibits an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance, consistenct with the action of a single gene acting with full penetrance. This family shows uniformly good structure and sound temperament, no discernible health affects, and is pursuing separate breed status. The unique genetics of this race have been studied at the University of California, Center for Veterinary Genetics, School of Veterinary Medicine."

EDIT: Oops! Ninja posters got to it before me! :)
If it is simply a color mutation, how does that qualify as a completely different breed?
 

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If it is simply a color mutation, how does that qualify as a completely different breed?
I personally don't think in this case it is a good idea, but isn't that the only difference in the White Shepherd which is a separate breed in some registries? Also there are other breeds where the only difference Between them is the coat (or size) and they are registered as separate breeds...

I think the main reasons they are pursuing separate breed status in this case are in order to be able to show the dogs and it also appeases the other GSD breeders who do not want these dogs bred as GSDs/in the breed "gene pool".
 

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I think the main reasons they are pursuing separate breed status in this case are in order to be able to show the dogs and it also appeases the other GSD breeders who do not want these dogs bred as GSDs/in the breed "gene pool".
I don't know if she's actively seeking breed recognition at this point in time, there aren't enough of them right now to be a breed on their own. She might be considering it as a future possibility and putting things in place "just in case". To be allowed into the FSS certain criteria has to be met including having a national parent club, (with I think at least 100 members) a registry, full documentation of the breeds history, and a breed standard. And that's the easy stuff.

Appeasing other GSD breeders probably isn't a major concern for her. (and that's just a guess on my part, but I think it's a good one) It wouldn't be one for me. I'm glad she had studies done that prove these are in fact GSD's. What she does with them is her business. :)
 
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