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Hello! I know this is going to sound crazy but I have a pack of 4 puppies! They are mostly Shepherds mixed with some Malamute in there, but they are so inseparable. They’re about to be 6 months old tomorrow!

Originally we adopted 3 (all from the same litter) and a friend adopted the last one of the litter, however, when he adopted his pup, he knew nothing about raising a fur baby. He negatively kennel trained the poor pup and kept him locked in a crate for endless hours since he worked 12 hour shifts and lived alone. Long story short(er), we told him to move in with us so he could be with his family.

The problem we’re having is every single night when we kennel the four of them in the living room, he cries endlessly - and it’s very loud too! (not something we can easily ignore)

We went to a pet trainer who told us to put him in “time out” when he does this and we’ve tried that but it does absolutely nothing, so we’ve tried ignoring him but then there’s the issue that no one gets ANY sleep because he screams (like a human) and he’s persistent about it too, he’ll give up after an hour and doze off for maybe half an hour and then go right back to it when he wakes up in his kennel. We’ve also tried letting him outside and leaving him alone out there for an hour or so and that worked for a while but now he just howls outside and for our neighbors sakes we can’t have him doing that.

The one thing we have found that works is having him sleep in the room with his owner, but then our other pups realize he’s not there and start howling and whining themselves and we’re all losing so much sleep over this and would love any suggestions that might help with this issue!

Thank you in advance!!
 

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Yikes. It sounds like the pups have bonded very strongly to each other, which is an issue with siblings but especially with the Northern Breed in there.

At this point, think very seriously about adopting out two and keeping only a male-female pair. Both malamutes and GSD are notorious for same-sex aggression and siblings will absolutely fight at maturity (12-24 months roughly). They will not care that it is 'family'- dogs don't follow any code of human ethics.

Are you prepared to house and feed and train and exercise four adult large/x-large breed, high energy, highly intelligent working dogs?

I don't want to be a huge downer, but a pack of two usually works very well, 3 and up, it's a lifestyle and a second job... speaking from experience. To simplify things for all, I would strongly encourage you to rehome two of these beautiful pups, especially because they are still very young.
 

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What Saco said.

From the blue eye I am going to say there is Siberian Husky in there.

I have also noticed more of this sibling bonding between husky breeds too.
 

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One of my dogs is a husky mix.If she didn't get to run,hunt,and run some more at least two or three days a week I imagine she would become restless and neurotic.If I was brave enough to own a team of four,they would be pulling a cart or sled a few times a week.
I knew a guy that had five huskies that were his transportation to and from work daily:)When they weren't carting or sledding they laid around and napped.Best of luck to you!
 

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I agree with Saco.....

If you decide to keep more than one, each dog needs to be able to function separately. Which means you need to begin (individually) crate training all four of them. Four separate rooms. The longer it goes on, the more difficult it will become. Each puppy needs to learn to function, relax, sleep, and pay attention to you (on demand) alone, as well as in the presence of the other dogs.

There are some pretty hardcore dog people on this forum, but even the most devoted members here don't tend to raise four littermate puppies with the intent of keeping them all.

The amount of time, space, and resources required is beyond daunting. Regardless of what you decide, I'd encourage you to stick around and keep reading, there is a lot of good info available.
 

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I have a senior GSD, a Husky cross ( mother was a silver GSD, and father was half shepherd, half Husky), and we now have two litter mates GSD’s. The pups are not both ours, one is a friends pup staying with us until his house is finished being built.

My senior was about 6-7 when we got our Husky. It was immediately clear that I had to be the driving force in the home, because the Husky bonded with my GSD immediately, and couldn’t care less about humans. It took a huge amount of separating the two and working on obedience and training separately. The Husky wouldn’t listen to a single command given, unless he was following my GSD’s behavior. It took a few weeks, but keeping them separated and separate walks and training finally did the trick. He listens to me instead of looking to Lyka for cues.

I put him in agility classes and obedience classes completely separate from my GSD. It was exhausting and time consuming with just two! The Husky’s energy levels are through the roof, and he needs jobs, or he gets destructive. We ended up building an agility course for him at home to keep him from destructive behavior at home on the days he didn’t have classes.

When we introduced the two new pups, everyone got along great. A week later, my GSD pup had an accident that fractured her jaw, and we have had to keep her separated from the other 3. She’s doing great, but the GSD pup that isn’t ours has gone full pack. He will not listen to his owner at all, and his owner finds it easier for my Husky and GSD to “train” him. He’s going to be in for a rude awakening when his house is done, and he has a puppy on his hands that has now been separated from his pack. He’s going to have to put in double the effort needed to train a non pack dog.

If you decide to keep all 4, prepare yourself for doing nothing but working one on one with each of them, and keeping them separated until they bond with you more than the pack.

Also be aware you that will have to constantly shift dogs around as they mature, or you will be breaking up a TON of fights since they are all siblings. They will be more aggressive with each other as siblings. I would never in my wildest dreams get two pups from the same litter, let alone 4! I agree with previous advice given, look into rehoming at least 2 of the pups. It will make your and the pups odds at success much easier.

If you’re sure you're keeping all four, get them into separate classes ASAP. Husky GSD hybrids (normally called shepskis), are extremely high energy and need a lot of outlets to keep them from being destructive in the home and yard.

Good luck, and best wishes!
 

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Hello! I know this is going to sound crazy but I have a pack of 4 puppies! They are mostly Shepherds mixed with some Malamute in there, but they are so inseparable. They’re about to be 6 months old tomorrow!

Originally we adopted 3 (all from the same litter) and a friend adopted the last one of the litter, however, when he adopted his pup, he knew nothing about raising a fur baby. He negatively kennel trained the poor pup and kept him locked in a crate for endless hours since he worked 12 hour shifts and lived alone. Long story short(er), we told him to move in with us so he could be with his family.

The problem we’re having is every single night when we kennel the four of them in the living room, he cries endlessly - and it’s very loud too! (not something we can easily ignore)

We went to a pet trainer who told us to put him in “time out” when he does this and we’ve tried that but it does absolutely nothing, so we’ve tried ignoring him but then there’s the issue that no one gets ANY sleep because he screams (like a human) and he’s persistent about it too, he’ll give up after an hour and doze off for maybe half an hour and then go right back to it when he wakes up in his kennel. We’ve also tried letting him outside and leaving him alone out there for an hour or so and that worked for a while but now he just howls outside and for our neighbors sakes we can’t have him doing that.

The one thing we have found that works is having him sleep in the room with his owner, but then our other pups realize he’s not there and start howling and whining themselves and we’re all losing so much sleep over this and would love any suggestions that might help with this issue!

Thank you in advance!!
I have some doubts that you are willing to rehome, since you adopted 3 at once.

I have had as many as 21 dogs at a time and for many years averaged between 6 and 9. Dogs do NOT subscribe to human ideals and standards and about the only way you will ever have peace in your house with multiple dogs is to adhere strict rules and routines.
Unfortunately since you have let the inmates run the asylum you are in for an uphill battle. If they were my dogs we would be doing a strict no nonsense crate and rotate with no dogs together, ever, until they learn and respect the rules. Build an outside run or enclosure, and if they are part husky best make it escape proof. One dog in the run, one in the house, two in crates regardless of fussing. Separate walks, separate training, separate time with you. Both breeds are energetic so resign yourself to a lot of exercise. Both breeds are wicked smart so resign yourself to many years of out thinking dogs, and both breeds are seriously creative so be ready to come up with new and inventive ways to keep your house intact. It's high time to buckle up and get real. These are not cute babies anymore and allowing them to continue on this path is setting them up to fail and causing serious anxiety issues that will affect their health and well being. This would have been so much easier if you had started right away.
I am not trying to be mean but you made one bad decision, then another and for everyone's sanity and well being you need to start getting serious.
 

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Another option is to look up Stonnie Dennis on YouTube. He does a lot of training multiple dogs at the same time with a lot of success.
 

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3 and then 4 pups. I don't know how you're doing it. Even one is way too much for me. Good luck. That's just way too much work.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thank you everyone for your replies!!!

I guess I should have mentioned I’m not doing this alone, or with little resources! I have 4 other roommates and we have plenty of space for them to run around inside and out (and a chariot/tires to exercise them!)

We didn’t originally want 4, but somehow it ended up like that and since it did, we’re all very dedicated to raising them! I will take all of the advise shared here to my roommates and see what they think is best!! Thank you again to everyone!! 😄
 
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