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I don't know how to really read these, but something very dysplastic does jump out usually. Don't see anything like that off the bat here. Have her xrays been sent in? What did the vet think? Also, what does your friend want to do with her? I'd wait for official OFA results before breeding anything..but you said she is older, so hopefully it is not a question of breeding her? If it is for lifestyle and quality of life, look at the dog not the Xray is prevailing advice. Some dogs are very dysplastic on xray but lead very normal and active lives.
 

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Can’t read elbows to save my life. But the left hip does not look awesome. Coverage of the femoral head is shallow.

That said, if your friend is not looking to breed or compete in high impact sports then the dog may do just fine. You treat the dog not the X-ray.
 

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My guess would be mild D. You would think with the female being older the hips would already be certified.
What is your friend wanting to do with this female?
 

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Yes, hips are not well seated in the sockets. Sockets are too shallow - there should be more coverage of the joints. But as was said above, she could be fine, if your friend isn't planning to do active sports with her. I don't see any evidence of arthritic changes in the joints.

I have a female that's mildly dysplastic in one hip, and she's never had a lame day in her life, and she's now 12!
 

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I'd add if she is "older" and there is no visible serious femoral remodeling ..it probably is mild and asymptomatic? All probabilities without knowing more about the dog.
 

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Her age would be great to know.

Positioning appears quite good, image quality not ideal for viewing subtle changes but okay for general overview. Both femoral heads have less than 50% coverage, left much shallower than right, and both thereby could be described as mild to moderate subluxation. No major signs of osteoarthritis, though possible evidence for forming Morgans line on the left though it’s difficult to tell with image quality. I would take precautions with high impact activities and take other preventative steps to protect the joints (keep lean, low impact activity, increase muscle mass, etc.). Would not use for breeding.
 

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CanÂ’t read elbows to save my life.

It's not just you! Elbows are very tricky. Several excellent GP vets have told me that they ALWAYS send out elbows to the state university vet school's radiology department for an opinion. It's so inexpensive to do a radiology tele-consult ($41/image) that it just makes sense to get the expert eyes on them. I definitely wouldn't trust lay-person Internet crowdsourced opinions on reading elbows -- they're just too hard even for DVMs to read correctly.

OP, if you want an inexpensive radiology opinion, this is who we use -- I'm sure there are many other local options for you, and I'm only posting this one because it's SO affordable:
https://www.lsu.edu/vetmed/veterinary_hospital/services/diagnostic_imaging/index.php


They email the report to your vet pretty quickly after your vet uploads the digital images (assuming they have digital images and not films -- that's a different process, but none of my regular vets have used films for years).
 
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