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The conditions look horrible. I didn't realize it was 13 puppies. One should be able to manage 9 adults and a couple of litters without it getting that bad. But life hits hard sometimes. I am sure whoever it was did not set out to become a total scumbag. It looks like they live in a pretty incorporated area too, so no chance of the dogs being outside much, without neighbors complaining and limit laws and such. They have crates on top of crates, with a crusty looking fan.
 

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The conditions look horrible. I didn't realize it was 13 puppies. One should be able to manage 9 adults and a couple of litters without it getting that bad. But life hits hard sometimes. I am sure whoever it was did not set out to become a total scumbag. It looks like they live in a pretty incorporated area too, so no chance of the dogs being outside much, without neighbors complaining and limit laws and such. They have crates on top of crates, with a crusty looking fan.
The clip said no one was living there and the dogs were surrendered by the owner. So maybe it was a health problem where the owner got sick had to move and could not afford to maintain the dogs. That would have been the time to give them up before conditions got so bad.
 

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9 adults and 13 puppies. The puppies should be easy to place.
Yes, and no. They'll have a hundred applications for them in 24 hours once it hits the regional news. Of those hundred, fewer than 13 would be families you or I would choose as breed-competent or even breed-aware of what to expect from a German Shepherd puppy (or soon adolescent), and even fewer will have any plan for rehabilitating a pup that has been through a rough start or doing any training foundation. Fewer than 10% of pet homes do ANY training class -- including big box store classes -- and that number will hold true with shelter adoptions.

Placing these kind of pups in homes that stick is WAY harder than one would think -- good breeders know exactly what I'm talking about. Sure, everyone wants them, but the highest return rate of dogs in breed rescue is with puppies! The landsharkery is far worse than newbies expect, and young kids start crying because puppy-teeth and puppy-nails hurt. Meanwhile puppies almost always manage to destroy the kids' favorite toys, and some expensive adult shoes, making everybody mad. Eventually the parents decide they "have to protect the kids from becoming afraid of" this biting little dog....and it goes back. I've seen it over and over. "Good" homes for another calm, easy-going dog are not necessarily "good" for a GSD puppy, but nobody wants to hear it.
 

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The clip said no one was living there and the dogs were surrendered by the owner. So maybe it was a health problem where the owner got sick had to move and could not afford to maintain the dogs. That would have been the time to give them up before conditions got so bad.
Sigh, the time to call for help is when you have dogs living in crates, and crates on top of crates. That was long ago, for these folks. The thing is, a lot of folks don't know where to go to for help. When conditions get like that, people who might come for a puppy, they're going to leave without one and rightly so, but most of them will not call in the authorities. Some might in these days. So such a person would probably offer to meet at a gas station or mall parking lot. But who is the owner going to call? They do not want to "get rid" of all their dogs. They may even be afraid they will do just what they did and take all their dogs. They might be willing to let a couple go. But if they call the dog warden or animal control, they are probably going to come in and take them all, and possibly charge them as well. At least that is what they think is going to happen. If they call a rescue, the rescue will inform them that they do not or cannot take owner surrenders. If they drop them at a shelter, they would likely be put down before they leave the parking lot.

I also think mental health gets into these cases. People start out ok. But stuff happens, the death of a loved one maybe, and depression sets in. Then things start going south. The more south they go, the more depressed and overwhelmed people get. And the more depressed and overwhelmed, there is also the possibility that you miss the slow changes in the dogs' weight or condition.

We can all be angry with these people. Perhaps it makes folks feel better to vent it. But this is not an operation with 600 bitches and animals being pumped out for money and regardless of suffering. This looks more like a small-time breeder who probably loved their pets and got over their head. Probably a number of factors played in: death of a loved one, loss of a job, break up, health condition and subsequent depression, loss of mobility, etc. The thing is, I don't know what the answer is. It is easy to let things get out of hand. It is hard to find anyone who will help when things are getting there. It's almost like folks want to wait until it is deplorable so they can come in with a posse and cameras and show the world what lowlifes these people are, charge them with animal cruelty, and remove all the animals. I see this and I feel really sad. Sad for the person or people involved. It could be mental health issues or dementia. It could have been the death of the dog owner, and family members who don't know what they are doing trying to manage them. It could be a lot of things.
 

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I wonder if it an expression of a hoarding issue. Or the owner wound up economically dependent on selling puppies and could not see a way to survive without them. Either way it sad.
 
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