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I adopted her Friday, they spay her tomorrow morning and hold her until Tuesday morning, when I can pick her up. She will be 9.5 weeks. I adopted from the Mich. Humane Society and their procedure is to spay before the dog is allowed to leave, and is part of the adoption process.

After reading more on this issue on this forum, many people are saying you should wait until 6 months, 1st cycle, etc. :eek: I am starting to get really worried about my girl! I really didn't even think twice about this while I was there, assuming their veterinarians wouldn't do something that they know would harm a little pup. Should I try to call the MHS first thing in the morning and stop the procedure from happening?? Ahhh..
 

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I don't think there is much you can do about it. The HS probable spays/neuters all animals before they leave. The only reason Jax wasn't spayed before I adopted her is they let me take her that day because of how far I had driven and I made a vet appointment while I was standing in their lobby.
 

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There is no way for you to stop this from happening. I am a foster home for rescues and we spay and neuter all dogs regardless of age prior adoption and it's really no big deal.
 

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There is no way for you to stop this from happening. I am a foster home for rescues and we spay and neuter all dogs regardless of age prior adoption and it's really no big deal.
Spoken like a true HSUS drone.
There is much research now showing that yes, it is a big deal. The end of the world, no, but not nothing.
 

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See if there is any way they can let you wait to spay her. I would NOT be comfortable getting my puppy fixed that soon, NO WAY!
 

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It is unfortunate that most all HS now spay/neuter way to young. Seems the more data that comes out showing they should be older the more vets push to do it at an early age.

I doubt there is anything you can do to stop it. Take comfort in the fact that you are saving her life and giving her a loving home.
 

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Spoken like a true HSUS drone.
There is much research now showing that yes, it is a big deal. The end of the world, no, but not nothing.
That's rather a bit insulting. I'm hardly a drone. I do however have to deal with over-population and how incredibly stupid the general population is and how they can't be trusted with an intact dog.

I also have first hand experience with early spay and neuter, which I bet you don't, and have not seen any long term problems with it.
 

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That's rather a bit insulting. I'm hardly a drone. I do however have to deal with over-population and how incredibly stupid the general population is and how they can't be trusted with an intact dog.

I also have first hand experience with early spay and neuter, which I bet you don't, and have not seen any long term problems with it.
Yes I think that was very insulting!!! Elaine thank you for caring and taking in these pup. When it comes done to it these dogs get spayed or neuter to help reduce over populated shelters. Instead of insulting someone how tries to help this cause you should be thanking them!!!!!
 

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Spoken like a true HSUS drone.
That is just rude. Why would you call someone who fosters animals that?

Humane Societies aren't out to hurt animals and neither are the majority of people working for them. They are trying to ensure that the animals they adopt out aren't going to be left to reproduce at free will, which is what leads most puppies to the shelters to begin with. There is no other way to ensure that the owners they adopt to will follow through and spay/neuter these puppies, sure they can sign a contract to spay/neuter but shelters don't have the time/resources to make sure these owners follow through.

Is it ideal to be spayed at 9.5 weeks? No, but it could be worse for that puppy. Maybe they should leave this puppy in the shelter and let her be put to sleep instead, spare her from being altered too early. (This is me being sarcastic of course, just trying to prove a point that it is better this pup has a loving home and is altered early, than no home at all)
 

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It is true that it would be better for the puppy to be spayed and have a home than not spayed and stay at the shelter. I just wonder if there is a way that the shelter would allow for a later spay as long as it is done before the age of 1 year? It sure wouldn't hurt to ask or to push for it. I would present articles and findings to support my view on this. But if not spaying means leaving the puppy behind, then of course I would get it done.
 

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When we got our kittens from the shelter they were willing to let us take them home un-altered if we provided them with a vet reference saying that we were responsible and have had previous pets altered. Of course we also had to sign saying we would have them spayed/neutered at a later date as well, which we did. Maybe this could work?

If not just try to take peace in the fact you are giving her a WONDERFUL home filled with love, and that you are saving her life :)
 

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The fact is if you choose to adopt from a shelter/rescue, they are going to spay/neuter the animal. In this day, most do it before you take the animal. I don't see a problem with this. If you don't want to spay/neuter then don't adopt. All of my dogs have been adopted and all were spayed at a young age. This has never been an issue in my life. All my females were spayed early and, fortunately, all have led happy, healthy lives.
I have never met a group of people as opposed to spaying/neutering as the people on this forum. I find it a bit bizarre. But that is just my opinion.
 

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If you show them your research, they may accommodate your request.
I don't really buy the "pet overpopulation" claim anymore... in the 70's it was an issue but it's been decades now. The top reasons for pets being surrendered recently is:
Moving
Landlord issues
Cost of pet maintenance
No time for pet
Inadequate facilities
Too many pets in home
Pet illness (es)
Personal problems
Biting
No homes for littermates
I don't think it matters much to people whether their dogs came from "responsible breeders" or from an accidental litter of puppies from their neighbor when they're sending them to the pound at 4 years old.
 

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I have to agree....there are many dogs in shelters that were bought from responsible breeders and not oops litters. As a matter of fact are there any studies on the correlation between oops litters vs. breeders and shelter placement? I'd be willing to bet since there are fewer unintended than intended breedings each year the shelters are more likely to be swarmed with dogs from planned litters.

I also kinda support the drone comment, sorry. Elaine I don't seriously think your a drone, but commenting spay at 9.5 weeks has no side effects is unfair, and I'm sure you know it does. The comment sounded like a brainwashed HSUS comment to me and is misleading to the OP.

While it isn't the end of the world and sure beats euthanasia I'm sorry your going to have to do deal with an early spay. Those hormones are important for growth both physically and emotionally. I doubt they'll let you wait, but you could always ask if they would allow you to pre pay a vet for a spay at 9 months before her first heat?
 

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Your puppy will be fine, don't worry about it. Is it ideal to wait until they're older? Sure, but it's not bad for her either. Congrats on the new puppy and for adopting. I totally agree and support the effort and requirement to spay/neuter all shelter dogs before they're allowed to go home.
 

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As a foster home as well for a large shelter and previously private groups, it's common practice to spay/neuter them prior to placement.

Only one puppy out of all the dogs we've fostered was allowed to be adopted and spayed at a later date. The shelter approved it after many conversations with the new owners and the new owners vet. They were from a small rural town and had a long standing very good relationship with their vet who helped convince the shelter to allow them to wait until the pup was 6 mo old.

You can always ask, but don't expect to change their procedures based on what you read online. It's done nationwide every single day, and the benefits outweigh the risks by far.
 

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The fact is if you choose to adopt from a shelter/rescue, they are going to spay/neuter the animal. In this day, most do it before you take the animal. I don't see a problem with this. If you don't want to spay/neuter then don't adopt. All of my dogs have been adopted and all were spayed at a young age. This has never been an issue in my life. All my females were spayed early and, fortunately, all have led happy, healthy lives.
I have never met a group of people as opposed to spaying/neutering as the people on this forum. I find it a bit bizarre. But that is just my opinion.
Agreed.
 

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I have spayed my females before this one all before 1 yo. There is now data that suggests early spay increases the risk of hemangio sarcoma in female dogs. There is the long standing data that early spay decreases the risk of breast cancer in female dogs. My breeder (yes, I paid for this pup and two others - that means slightly less than half the dogs I've had have been purchased from breeders) wanted people to wait and spay later after the bitches had more fully developed.
There is thought that early spay affects drives, too.
The HS & AC require spay/neuter because they deal with so much pet overpopulation (it IS a problem in Arkansas right now.) Lots of people probably don't follow through with the spay/neuter that they had promised. Rendering the animal sterile before it leaves the custody of the HS is one way to assure that that happens.
 

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The fact is if you choose to adopt from a shelter/rescue, they are going to spay/neuter the animal. In this day, most do it before you take the animal. I don't see a problem with this. If you don't want to spay/neuter then don't adopt. All of my dogs have been adopted and all were spayed at a young age. This has never been an issue in my life. All my females were spayed early and, fortunately, all have led happy, healthy lives.
I have never met a group of people as opposed to spaying/neutering as the people on this forum. I find it a bit bizarre. But that is just my opinion.
:thumbup: Couldn't agree more.
 

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That's rather a bit insulting. I'm hardly a drone. I do however have to deal with over-population and how incredibly stupid the general population is and how they can't be trusted with an intact dog.

I also have first hand experience with early spay and neuter, which I bet you don't, and have not seen any long term problems with it.
:toasting:
 
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