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I was wondering if anyone here knows about OFA hips, I had Xrays done on Sam today and had them give me a copy of the Xray and I dont know how to read them or what they show. The vet said that the results should be back in about 2 weeks but I'd like to see what others think,. this is the first time I've had this done and I'm not good at comparing them to the ones on the OFA site. HELP! :help:
 

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The balls look like they're starting to deform and they don't look too snug in the sockets either. I'd guess mild HD... maybe fair at best.
 

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The balls look like they're starting to deform and they don't look too snug in the sockets either. I'd guess mild HD... maybe fair at best.
Oh god I was hoping for at least a Fair, both her parents have Good hips, and we were really careful about what she gets fed and not ever over-exercised, etc.... it would be terrible if she didn't pass. :cry:
 

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What did your vet think of the x-rays?

The hips really don't look terrible. He might never even show symptoms. I'd be proactive with glucosamine and supplementing starting now though.
 

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What did your vet think of the x-rays?

The hips really don't look terrible. He might never even show symptoms. I'd be proactive with glucosamine and supplementing starting now though.
the vet today said her elbows looked excellent but the hips she couldn't really tell she thought maybe Fair but said that the people at OFA would be a much better judge on the hips. I'll order some glucosamine right now.
 

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the vet today said her elbows looked excellent but the hips she couldn't really tell she thought maybe Fair but said that the people at OFA would be a much better judge on the hips. I'll order some glucosamine right now.
Wait for some more opinions before you start ordering stuff. There's a lot of breeders on here that knows about this stuff better than me. Maybe they'll have a different opinion than me.

There's lots of threads about supplementing and HD. Definitely do a search through some of those old threads. Lots of good info.
 

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I agree with Lucy. There is less than 50% coverage if the head, thickening if the neck and they look mottled already. I would be surprised if you got a Fair.

But I am not an orthopedist so my opinion is just that.




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I agree with Lucy. There is less than 50% coverage if the head, thickening if the neck and they look mottled already. I would be surprised if you got a Fair.

But I am not an orthopedist so my opinion is just that.




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That is not what I wanted to hear, but I do value your opinion and will be sitting on pins and needles until OFA gets back to me with their results.

Here is my other question though, Sammy tested positive for lyme and Anaplasmosis last year and this year, but shows no signs of either disease, if she had an infection of either or both, could that have effected her hips? The Vets determined there is not an active infection at this time, and she has always been on flea/tick preventative and heartworm preventative so I dont understand why she tested positive for those but she acts happy and healthy as can be, and never limps or shows any problems with her hips, etc. she always tests negative for heartworms. :confused:
 

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I'm thinking it's probably something genetic. Post her pedigree in the bloodlines and pedigrees section and see if the pedigree people see any dogs in there that may possibly throw bad hips.
 

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My first thought was that the right hip looked dysplastic... sorry, hope you get better results from OFA.. sending positive thoughts your way!
 

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Is he showing any symptoms at all? Any limping? Clicking noises? Hard to get up or down stairs? Bunny hopping?
 

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Does not appear to have a full desired covering of the femoral head. Right femoral head looks like it has some bone wear . No obvious signs in the joint capsule of osteoarthritis (which is what causes pain and slinical signs) but definite change to at least the right femoral head. Thickening of the femoral necks.

I would guess mild would be the rating. Possibly fair.

I nor anyone else on here is an orthopedic surgeon so wait for your results. Infection could potentially cause deposit and growth change but not sure if those two infections could. As well since it appears that the right one is worse, could be an old injury.

Zeke is 6 and was just diagnosed with mild dysplasia. He too has no signs of osteoarthritis setting in yet. keep her lean active and healtht with good muscle tone, look at supplements if she is labeled mild or fair, and youll be alright. Those are not horrible hips by any means.

Here are zekes mild hips. NOT OFA, btw. Just diagnosed as mild HD. His right side is also worse



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Examination of Hip Grading
The phenotypic evaluation of hips done by the Orthopedic Foundation for Animals falls into seven different categories. Those categories are Normal (Excellent, Good, Fair), Borderline, and Dysplastic (Mild, Moderate, Severe). Once each of the radiologists classifies the hip into one of the 7 phenotypes above, the final hip grade is decided by a consensus of the 3 independent outside evaluations. Examples would be:

  1. Two radiologists reported Excellent, one Good—the final grade would be Excellent
  2. One radiologist reported Excellent, one Good, one Fair—the final grade would be Good
  3. One radiologist reported Fair, two radiologists reported Mild—the final grade would be Mild
The hip grades of Excellent, Good and Fair are within normal limits and are given OFA numbers. This information is accepted by AKC on dogs with permanent identification (tattoo, microchip) and is in the public domain. Radiographs of Borderline, Mild, Moderate and Severely dysplastic hip grades are reviewed by the OFA radiologist and a radiographic report is generated documenting the abnormal radiographic findings. Unless the owner has chosen the open database, dysplastic hip grades are not in the public domain.
Excellent

Excellent: this classification is assigned for superior conformation in comparison to other animals of the same age and breed. There is a deep seated ball (femoral head) which fits tightly into a well-formed socket (acetabulum) with minimal joint space. There is almost complete coverage of the socket over the ball.

Good

Good: slightly less than superior but a well-formed congruent hip joint is visualized. The ball fits well into the socket and good coverage is present.

Fair

Fair: Assigned where minor irregularities in the hip joint exist. The hip joint is wider than a good hip phenotype. This is due to the ball slightly slipping out of the socket causing a minor degree of joint incongruency. There may also be slight inward deviation of the weight-bearing surface of the socket (dorsal acetabular rim) causing the socket to appear slightly shallow. This can be a normal finding in some breeds however, such as the Chinese Shar Pei, Chow Chow, and Poodle.

Borderline

Borderline: there is no clear cut consensus between the radiologists to place the hip into a given category of normal or dysplastic. There is usually more incongruency present than what occurs in the minor amount found in a fair but there are no arthritic changes present that definitively diagnose the hip joint being dysplastic. There also may be a bony projection present on any of the areas of the hip anatomy illustrated above that can not accurately be assessed as being an abnormal arthritic change or as a normal anatomic variant for that individual dog. To increase the accuracy of a correct diagnosis, it is recommended to repeat the radiographs at a later date (usually 6 months). This allows the radiologist to compare the initial film with the most recent film over a given time period and assess for progressive arthritic changes that would be expected if the dog was truly dysplastic. Most dogs with this grade (over 50%) show no change in hip conformation over time and receive a normal hip rating; usually a fair hip phenotype.
Mild

Mild Hip Dysplasia: there is significant subluxation present where the ball is partially out of the socket causing an incongruent increased joint space. The socket is usually shallow only partially covering the ball. There are usually no arthritic changes present with this classification and if the dog is young (24 to 30 months of age), there is an option to resubmit an radiograph when the dog is older so it can be reevaluated a second time. Most dogs will remain dysplastic showing progression of the disease with early arthritic changes. Since HD is a chronic, progressive disease, the older the dog, the more accurate the diagnosis of HD (or lack of HD).


Moderate

Moderate Hip Dysplasia: there is significant subluxation present where the ball is barely seated into a shallow socket causing joint incongruency. There are secondary arthritic bone changes usually along the femoral neck and head (termed remodeling), acetabular rim changes (termed osteophytes or bone spurs) and various degrees of trabecular bone pattern changes called sclerosis. Once arthritis is reported, there is only continued progression of arthritis over time.

Severe

Severe Hip Dysplasia: assigned where radiographic evidence of marked dysplasia exists. There is significant subluxation present where the ball is partly or completely out of a shallow socket. Like moderate HD, there are also large amounts of secondary arthritic bone changes along the femoral neck and head, acetabular rim changes and large amounts of abnormal bone pattern changes.

Other Hip Dysplasia Registries—An Approximation


OFAFCI (European)BVA (UK/Australia)SV (Germany)ExcellentA-10-4 (no > 3/hip)NormalGoodA-25-10 (no > 6/hip)NormalFairB-111-18NormalBorderlineB-219-25Fast NormalMildC26-35Noch ZugelassenModerateD36-50Mittlere
 

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Is he showing any symptoms at all? Any limping? Clicking noises? Hard to get up or down stairs? Bunny hopping?
No none of those, she runs really fast too chasing toys, etc and has no problems. Never bunny hops and gets up and lays down with no problems at all. She's 2.5 years old and we've never seen her show any signs of HD.
 

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Keep her lean and fit and she quite possibly won't have any problems. I had one with severe hips who did fine all her life! Not breeding material but...........
 

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for what it's worth Anubis the positioning of your dog is terrible. I would re do the shot .
I was thinking she did that X-ray to look for problems causing pain, but I could be wrong. You do not need perfect or near perfect positioning for that. Im not sure why people in GENERAL get their panties all in a wad over positioning when people post xrays & are just looking for something causing pain (which is not this thread but I see it in lots of threads). No way in real life when I take pelvis X-rays I am going to get great positioning all the time. It would take way too long, most dogs are not that compliant, most would require sedation, which most owners will not pay for just to look and see if the hips are what is causing a limp, pain, etc. some of these dogs are 90-100+ lbs, with most techs and vets being females, just not going to happen in day to day general practice. There are always risks to sedation as well. For some reason many of the GSD, Goldens, and Labs I see are HUGE, yes many overweight but many not, just humongous. It is a rare day I see a golden that isn't up near 100 lbs. I see so many people hating on the vet clinic for not great positioning, and it just grinds my gears, how about you come in there and wrestle this 100 lb furry beast who is flailing all over the place, trying to bite, trying to to throw itself off the table, kicking people in the face and scratching them.....most dogs are not comfortable laying directly on their back, let alone getting their legs pulled tight to get them out straight.
I do not see a reason on her X-ray that those hips would be causing the dog pain, which she confirms. That is all most people want to know.
 

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I love my vet clinic --- x rays prelims, pre-purchase (police candidates) and OFA's . Beautiful positions. Crisp clear definition (setting) . No sedation. Vet Dr Jim Holmes a man in his late 60's and slim young female vet techs.
I have been using him for the last 25 years - I hope he does not retire before I do.
He also does x rays for a local Leonberger breeder . Same procedure - no sedation.
 
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