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Yep I made the mistake of kicking snow for mine to play with once. She was a terror if you picked up a snow shovel. Hose, same.

And she would follow me staring at my feet to see if I would kick snow. Luckily I realized real quick that was going to be a big problem and told her she was never allowed to fixate on my feet.
We realized it was a problem too, fairly quickly, and we haven't played it since that one day when it was started. How did you get her off your feet? Redirecting?
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Yep I made the mistake of kicking snow for mine to play with once. She was a terror if you picked up a snow shovel. Hose, same.

And she would follow me staring at my feet to see if I would kick snow. Luckily I realized real quick that was going to be a big problem and told her she was never allowed to fixate on my feet.
Exactly what Kias does, and what I did. Well, I'm in for it!
 

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We realized it was a problem too, fairly quickly, and we haven't played it since that one day when it was started. How did you get her off your feet? Redirecting?
I wish I remembered better, it was a long time ago. I think I just refused to move or do anything until she stopped focusing on my feet. And I NEVER kicked snow again for her in her life
 

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" Wanna play kicky?".....3 words that capture my dog's attention as much as anything.

As a pup she had this "fascination" with my feet or mostly anything my feet moved .....leaves in the fall, snow in the winter and water in the summer at the lake.....

Rather than not allowing the behavior.....I used it as a reward and trained a fair amount of impulse control into the dog using the kicking game. Dog had to hold and wait for a release command and then the fun began....and then...just as quickly the dog had to exhibit some impulse control per my command...even as I continued kicking things.... then we could start the game again....a clear beginning and ending of sorts. It took a bit of patience and a few misdirected bites in the beginning but the indulging of her prey drive with this particular "game" and training accomplished a lot. Water, snow and leaves are lifeless until my feet put them into motion......the motion and the capture was only possible with me animating these objects....so it really was a "team" effort.

SuperG
 

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Discussion Starter #25
" Wanna play kicky?".....3 words that capture my dog's attention as much as anything.

As a pup she had this "fascination" with my feet or mostly anything my feet moved .....leaves in the fall, snow in the winter and water in the summer at the lake.....

Rather than not allowing the behavior.....I used it as a reward and trained a fair amount of impulse control into the dog using the kicking game. Dog had to hold and wait for a release command and then the fun began....and then...just as quickly the dog had to exhibit some impulse control per my command...even as I continued kicking things.... then we could start the game again....a clear beginning and ending of sorts. It took a bit of patience and a few misdirected bites in the beginning but the indulging of her prey drive with this particular "game" and training accomplished a lot. Water, snow and leaves are lifeless until my feet put them into motion......the motion and the capture was only possible with me animating these objects....so it really was a "team" effort.

SuperG
Huh. That's definitely a different way to thing about it. I guess I could try using it as a reward, but I'm worried he'll start biting my feet whenever he wants to play if I do that, like NCShepherds dog does.
 

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Huh. That's definitely a different way to thing about it. I guess I could try using it as a reward, but I'm worried he'll start biting my feet whenever he wants to play if I do that, like NCShepherds dog does.

Hence the clear beginning and ending I mentioned......Steve Strom really helped me understand this approach and it can used in so many other situations which left unchecked can become problematic.

FWIW....allowing the dog to initiate any play or training sessions is going to work against you over the long haul.

I'm sure most GSD owners have trained an on and off switch for their dogs....and the impulse control training with the "kicky" game is along the same lines but a much shorter duration of "ons and offs:" since it occurs throughout the game/training session.

Like others have mentioned .....the garden hose sprayer, snowshovel, garden rake etc. are naturals for the dog to go bonkers over.......but just train with those items as the reward for the dog exhibiting a commanded position with a wait until you release the dog to go crazy over the hose sprayer etc. Getting my current dog to wait for release with a piece of food in front of it was easy compared to getting the dog to hold position while I was kicking leaves or throwing snow.....but every time the dog broke its "wait" the water quit coming out of the hose or I quit kicking the leaves.......the dog figured it out over time......

SuperG
 

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Okay, but that's a little different. You did a good job of taking care of that problem, though. I'm wondering, will he grow out of it? Should I allow him just to do it? I don't want him learning to bite people's feet.
In my view, it's always different. The pup's different, the owner is different, specifics about the setting differ, and the behavior may differ as well. However, all these pups, owners, settings and specific behaviors reflect that, at base, it's a training issue. If you don't want him to continue the behavior (and that are very good reasons why you wouldn't), then it's on you to train him 'out' of it --- whether it's via redirection, shaping a competing behavior, or consistent correction. Or, you could ignore it and hope that he grows out of it. I'm not especially sanguine about that approach. IME puppies rarely grow out exciting and self-reinforcing behavior unless someone encourages/trains them to do so.

I'm reminded of something a forum member once said in response another poster's difficulties. Something along the lines of, "Don't let your puppy indulge in behavior that'll make you dislike him as an adult." There's a lot of truth in that statement.

You've gotten a variety of suggestions that have worked for other folks. My advice would be to pick one that you're comfortable with, follow it consistently for few weeks, and assess where you are. You may need to toggle things a bit or you may decide to take a completely different approach.

Many roads...
 

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In my view, it's always different. The pup's different, the owner is different, specifics about the setting differ, and the behavior may differ as well. However, all these pups, owners, settings and specific behaviors reflect that, at base, it's a training issue. If you don't want him to continue the behavior (and that are very good reasons why you wouldn't), then it's on you to train him 'out' of it --- whether it's via redirection, shaping a competing behavior, or consistent correction. Or, you could ignore it and hope that he grows out of it. I'm not especially sanguine about that approach. IME puppies rarely grow out exciting and self-reinforcing behavior unless someone encourages/trains them to do so.

I'm reminded of something a forum member once said in response another poster's difficulties. Something along the lines of, "Don't let your puppy indulge in behavior that'll make you dislike him as an adult." There's a lot of truth in that statement.

You've gotten a variety of suggestions that have worked for other folks. My advice would be to pick one that you're comfortable with, follow it consistently for few weeks, and assess where you are. You may need to toggle things a bit or you may decide to take a completely different approach.

Many roads...
Thanks for that. I will.
 
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