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Discussion Starter #1
This has been happening for a while, but now I'm worried because it has Kias really hyped up about it over the past few months.
Whenever I shuffle my feet or make noise with them, any kind of noise, shuffling, scooting, tapping, and Kias takes off. He's runs over and begins barking worriedly and scratching all around my feet, or anybody else's that makes the noise. It's so weird, so I thought would see if this has happened to anybody else. Thoughts?
 

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Our dog loves to jump up worried if I shuffle quickly around. She also loved to bite at the vacuum cleaner non stop. She has finally given up the barking at the vacuum cleaner now at age 2. :p However, she has never given up her love of barking and jumping at shovels when I use them haha.
 

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I think your puppy is showing signs of pre-pubescent dimentia...

KIDDING!!!

Sounds pretty normal to me. He knows that you're not supposed to walk that way LOL!

I had a Chihuahua that used to bark at people like crazy if they scuffed a foot while walking, otherwise he paid them no mind, and he was actually very outgoing and friendly for a Chihuahua.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Sounds like dogs who go after shovels, rakes, etc. If you kick snow by accident some dogs will go for you feet like that.
Oh yah, he goes after snow like mad. But we started really noticing it when it wasn't snow. Evenon the driveway, if I scuff my feet he is all over me. Why does he do that? It's not like he loves it; he does the "I'm really worried don't do that" bark. he used to go after rakes when he was tiny, but he doesn't any more.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Our dog loves to jump up worried if I shuffle quickly around. She also loved to bite at the vacuum cleaner non stop. She has finally given up the barking at the vacuum cleaner now at age 2. :p However, she has never given up her love of barking and jumping at shovels when I use them haha.
Age 2?! Kias won"t even get near the vacuum cleaner with a ten foot pole! in that case it will probably be three for him! 😄
 

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I kind of have the same problem in a way. We kicked the sand once as play (We kicked it in the air and Eva would bite and play with it). Now at parks, etc, she bites our feet to get us to play. We ignore her and when she bites we firmly say "off". We try to move her too so she understands to stay off, but instead she bites our hands and makes a protest sound because she is trying to force us to play. And if she's at the dog park playing and she runs by she tries to bite our arms or hands (never usually successful but sometimes is). She has never drawn blood but it hurts and she shouldn't be doing it, it also looks like she is aggressive and I don't want people to think that when we're out. How would I stop this? It's been 2 months and she still hasn't got it (she's a little "special"). We try standing on no sand/ dirt, but she stills bites our feet and hands. She's really mouthy in general and because she is "special" I think we got her the best we can. But, any help with this outside of the home? Right now inside our house she only nips/ mouths if she gets too excited, or it's my mom, she really likes my mom's fingers. She'll probably calm down when she is older inside, but I don't know what to do for the sand.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I kind of have the same problem in a way. We kicked the sand once as play (We kicked it in the air and Eva would bite and play with it). Now at parks, etc, she bites our feet to get us to play. We ignore her and when she bites we firmly say "off". We try to move her too so she understands to stay off, but instead she bites our hands and makes a protest sound because she is trying to force us to play. And if she's at the dog park playing and she runs by she tries to bite our arms or hands (never usually successful but sometimes is). She has never drawn blood but it hurts and she shouldn't be doing it, it also looks like she is aggressive and I don't want people to think that when we're out. How would I stop this? It's been 2 months and she still hasn't got it (she's a little "special"). We try standing on no sand/ dirt, but she stills bites our feet and hands. She's really mouthy in general and because she is "special" I think we got her the best we can. But, any help with this outside of the home? Right now inside our house she only nips/ mouths if she gets too excited, or it's my mom, she really likes my mom's fingers. She'll probably calm down when she is older inside, but I don't know what to do for the sand.
Look on some of the other mouthy-dog threads. Those will help you with your problem. Also teaching leave it, as Ckai said. She sounds maybe even nervous??? but i'm not really sure on that one.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I know that high prey drive dogs will try to nip their owners or smaller children to get them to go the way the dog wants, But I've no idea what she is like, so that's just a random guess.

It could even be just antagonistic, trying to get you to respond to her nipping?
 

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"off" is our version of leave-it (for everything). So she knows it well, and she will listen when we tell her off. But she will come back and just won't get it, I understand it takes time, but 2 months for a simple thing? Hopefully it'll get better in the future. She is a pushy dog and knows how to get on my nerves, lol, she enjoys making me mad. But at the park we don't do that. Maybe I'll buy a bag of sand and try training self control in the backyard first, or we'll go to the dog park when nobody will be there for practice. She has gotten a tiny bit better since she first started doing it (less times coming back) but the biting is getting harder.
 

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Oh, and she used to get "territorial" over her sand if she is trying to get us play. She snapped at another shepherd at the park once, but thankfully it snapped back and she learned her lesson, she doesn't do that anymore. :LOL:. I'll bring a toy next time as well to try redirecting, although that has proved ineffective for nipping in the house.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Oh, and she used to get "territorial" over her sand if she is trying to get us play. She snapped at another shepherd at the park once, but thankfully it snapped back and she learned her lesson, she doesn't do that anymore. :LOL:. I'll bring a toy next time as well to try redirecting, although that has proved ineffective for nipping in the house.
That dog loves sand! But I don't understand: how does the sand relate to her nipping your feet. I guess I just don't understand the question. Could you rephrase the sand part?
 

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My dad kicked the sand once as a game. He kicked it in the air and she jumped at it and bit at it, etc. Similar to a dog playing with water coming out of a hose (she loves that too). So, because the feet is what makes the sand go flying, she bites them to make them kick the sand. I guess it hard to explain without actually seeing it, but it’s the best I can do
 

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Discussion Starter #14
My dad kicked the sand once as a game. He kicked it in the air and she jumped at it and bit at it, etc. Similar to a dog playing with water coming out of a hose (she loves that too). So, because the feet is what makes the sand go flying, she bites them to make them kick the sand. I guess it hard to explain without actually seeing it, but it’s the best I can do
Ohhhhh. I see. That makes sense, but through all the conversation, i come to the final, crashing point: I can't help you with that one. :D Maybe start a thread. You'll get more help there than i can offer. Good luck with your sand biter!
 

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Ha, I figured a lot if people couldn’t. It seems like a very odd thing that literally only my dog would do (as I’ve said before, she is “special”). I’m gonna try everything I can think of before making a new thread, but I’m in the same situation you are. The only other dog I’ve had is our dachshund who we got when I was 4 (she’s 10 now) and so I have no idea how they trained her. But, my parents also don’t know too much about shepherd training. I read books and everything for a year, but nothing beats true experience. So... we’ll see if she’s improved in the next month or so :LOL:
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Ha, I figured a lot if people couldn’t. It seems like a very odd thing that literally only my dog would do (as I’ve said before, she is “special”). I’m gonna try everything I can think of before making a new thread, but I’m in the same situation you are. The only other dog I’ve had is our dachshund who we got when I was 4 (she’s 10 now) and so I have no idea how they trained her. But, my parents also don’t know too much about shepherd training. I read books and everything for a year, but nothing beats true experience. So... we’ll see if she’s improved in the next month or so :LOL:
Wait...are you an adult or adolescent? You sounded like an adult for a second, but now it seems different.
There are a ton of informative people here that can help you much better than me. just pick one and message them! They'll help you out. I'm a novice in the dog world, but some of the others here are both experts and really nice!
(My parents don't know much about shepherd training either; that's why I joined here!) :)
 

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I’m 14 but I sound and act way older than I really am. People have helped me on here before, but I’m the type if person who refuses help until I can’t think of anything else, (it’s a good and bad thing). But I will definitely make a new thread if redirecting and practicing doesn’t help. I also go to training classes, so I’ll ask our trainer then too. I’m sure it will be very odd thing she’s been asked though, we always get the animals with odd personalities and quirks. Not complaining though, but it sure can be frustrating or annoying! Our dachshund is pretty much a cat, and my bearded dragon is a very low maintenance dog that steals my food. :rolleyes:
 

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My take on it is he IS worried. I'm betting that he thinks, "Something's wrong! Mommy's feet aren't supposed to make that noise!" He's saving you from your slippers... ;)

My girl, Rachel, did something similar the first time she saw me going up a step stool to hang a clock in the kitchen. Barking, whining and racing over to nip at my feet to in an obvious attempt to herd me off the stool. Sit and Stay were no use because as soon I started up again she did too. So, I gated off the kitchen, put her and proceeded to hang the clock without drama.

As I decided that this was basically a training issue, we did 5 minute sessions with the step stool for the next couple of weeks. A firm NO if she whined or barked, yummy treats and praise if she turned down the volume. By the second week, the gates were removed and she'd progressed to sitting beside me as I traversed Mt. Everest --- with only the occasional whine of protest. Now, she'll investigate the stool when I drag it out and watch me carefully as I begin the 'ascent,' but that's it.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
My take on it is he IS worried. I'm betting that he thinks, "Something's wrong! Mommy's feet aren't supposed to make that noise!" He's saving you from your slippers... ;)

My girl, Rachel, did something similar the first time she saw me going up a step stool to hang a clock in the kitchen. Barking, whining and racing over to nip at my feet to in an obvious attempt to herd me off the stool. Sit and Stay were no use because as soon I started up again she did too. So, I gated off the kitchen, put her and proceeded to hang the clock without drama.

As I decided that this was basically a training issue, we did 5 minute sessions with the step stool for the next couple of weeks. A firm NO if she whined or barked, yummy treats and praise if she turned down the volume. By the second week, the gates were removed and she'd progressed to sitting beside me as I traversed Mt. Everest --- with only the occasional whine of protest. Now, she'll investigate the stool when I drag it out and watch me carefully as I begin the 'ascent,' but that's it.
Okay, but that's a little different. You did a good job of taking care of that problem, though. I'm wondering, will he grow out of it? Should I allow him just to do it? I don't want him learning to bite people's feet.
 

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My dad kicked the sand once as a game. He kicked it in the air and she jumped at it and bit at it, etc. Similar to a dog playing with water coming out of a hose (she loves that too). So, because the feet is what makes the sand go flying, she bites them to make them kick the sand. I guess it hard to explain without actually seeing it, but it’s the best I can do
Yep I made the mistake of kicking snow for mine to play with once. She was a terror if you picked up a snow shovel. Hose, same.

And she would follow me staring at my feet to see if I would kick snow. Luckily I realized real quick that was going to be a big problem and told her she was never allowed to fixate on my feet.
 
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