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Okay, so I feel like a bloody moron. I met up with the trainer from PetCo today who we are doing our CGC through. She is a wonderful woman who trains/shows/breeds Rotties. When I told her I was interested in not only CGC, but maybe a few other working/obedience titles, she got very excited.

Long story short, she's willing to work with me outside of the CGC classes on preparing for them, but she asked me what I wanted to do. When I told her I had no clue, she said to research the trials I wanted to work on and then go from there.

So, I'm opening the floor to suggestions. I would like Finn to be able to have the UDX after his name, but I am really liking the TDU and other tracking competitions.

He is definately more comfortable when it comes to tracking/trailing, but I'm sure that he would be fine in Obedience.

Finn just turned 4. If he is as lucky as his parents, they didn't start slowing down until around 8 or 9. I've already made a personal promise to Finn that I'd 'retire' him at 8 as long as we aren't dealing with any joint issues before then.

As I said, any and all suggestions and advice will be gratefully taken.
 

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there's lots of things you could do, Rally is FUN, not alot of stress, kind of gives you an intro into say obedience if you want to go that route.

Tracking is also fun, Nosework classes if you can find them.

I'd start with www.akc.org site, look up what type of competition your interested in and you should find, the regs, the exercises that kind of thing.

I say, definitely take advantage of this womans expertise to help you . And heck you don't have to limit yourself to 'one' thing,,do it all:)
 

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I really don't want to do Obedience. I like the idea of being active and I think Finn does as well. When it comes to obedience things like long stays or downs, he's just not as responsive as he is when it comes to doing figure 8s or anything where he's allowed to move. I'm not going to put him through something he just doesn't seem to like.

I want my dog to have as many titles as yours do.:D

What is Rally? I've heard about it, but don't know too much about it.

How long did it take you to train for some of your titles? Are there a lot that just flow into the other? The UD reqs seem like they would be a great starting point for TDU or any other Tracking/Trailing events. Besides, Finn is already doing SAR, so I would love to expound on that specific foundation.

What do some of the acronyms mean after your dogs' name?
 

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Hi Shaolin. I happened to read this. I also like Rally. It's the most fun parts of obedience, without the long stays. My dog really enjoys it, and it's great for younger dogs with shorter attention spans.

Here's a video example.



A lot of the titles on Jakoda's dogs are agility, there's a herding title HIT, obedience CD, a temperament test TT, and some ASCA titles.
 

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Rally is fun! You take the basic obedience skills and do them in a sequence set up by the judge, a course with markers, or cards. Its fun, quick moving, you can talk to and encourage your dog. Its a great starting point to just figure out how dog shows work! Go on you tube.com to look at videos of rally and of course, on the akc website as well.
 

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Man, I hate rally. It's for people that can't do obedience. It's sort of the joke in the obedience world. If all you want to do is play around with your dog without having to do much real training, then that's the way to go. If you want to have a well trained dog that is reliable every day outside of training, then go for real obedience titles.
 

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Man, I hate rally. It's for people that can't do obedience. It's sort of the joke in the obedience world. If all you want to do is play around with your dog without having to do much real training, then that's the way to go. If you want to have a well trained dog that is reliable every day outside of training, then go for real obedience titles.
Boy, I dont usually take offense, but that statement bothers me. Lots of folks like rally. People can have fun with their dogs and train their dogs in many different ways. If the "obedience world" is making jokes about the "rally world" then they have a problem. People are always at different levels in thier training, depending on their own life circumstances. Maybe they are to arthritic, maybe taking care of a sick elderly family member, busy with work, etc.. dont be so judgemental.
I enjoy Rally, my dog is well trained and reliable outside of everyday training.

To the original poster, do things you enjoy and have fun with your dog. As much as folks would have you believe here on this forum, not everyone has a UDX and IPO title on thier dog.
 

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Well here's the run down...you need a CD (novice level) to go onto a CDX (open level) and then a UD (Utility) and then UDX (qualifying in the open level and utility level at 10 shows). Skilled trainers can get a UD on their dog by the age of 3. But they start with their dog from day one with that goal. It gets more difficult to do it when you already have a dog that has some bad habits. Remember those bad habits cost you points in the ring and if you've been kind of lenient with straight sits, close heels, things of that nature it will be a little bit more work to retrain your dog properly.

There is also a new level called BN, I did that with my dog since I didn't know anything about trialing. It was a fun experience and really good for a young dog. He is now a little over 2, just got his CD and we will start trialing for CDX soon. I don't think he'll have his UD by 3, we might get there by 4 and then hopefully a UDX soon after. Remember when it comes to AKC obedience there are some exercises which if they get blown...you don't qualify at all, its not just a loss of points. From the shows I've seen...its a good day if 50% of dogs trialing in open and utility qualify.

Look up some youtube videos of AKC novice obedience, AKC open obedience, and utility as well (although it seems like you know what that one is already). Utility is quite difficult, its a great goal but I would start slow and see what the lower levels are about. There are a lot of dogs at my club that although the owner had dreams of UD, the dog just wasn't cut out for it and all it managed was a CD or maybe a CDX.

Your dog being 4...could definitely still do it, but like I said it will take a lot of work on your part. Many people don't get a UD on their dog in 4-5 years when they start training for competition from day one, much less when they have a grown dog already.
 

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My dogs all have Obedience titles, as well as Rally titles. Some dogs don't enjoy the formality of Obedience, and let's be honest: Novice Obedience is B-0-R-I-N-G for a lot of dogs. Echo hates on-leash obedience, but she excels off leash. If she didn't have poor hips I'd be learning agility along with her. There's something for just about any dog and handler team, it's just a matter of finding what makes you both happy.
 

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Man, I hate rally. It's for people that can't do obedience. It's sort of the joke in the obedience world. If all you want to do is play around with your dog without having to do much real training, then that's the way to go. If you want to have a well trained dog that is reliable every day outside of training, then go for real obedience titles.
Elaine, are you going through a rough time or something?

I have Rally titles and I have obedience titles. I am losing my hearing and for Rally, I don't need to hear. But evenso, I prefer Rally.

The first dog I put through obedience, got a red and two white ribbons on her RN, and three blue ribbons for her CD, with NO EXTRA TRAINING.

So, I just don't agree with you that Rally is a joke.

I do agree that obedience people like you, (see bolded), tend to be snooty towards the Rally people, they make idiotic statements to them at shows, tell them to crate their perfectly behaved dogs, practice in front of the rally rings where dogs are working, rather than in front of their own obedience rings where they don't want to mess up the dogs. Their dogs run out of the rings, and attack dogs on the long sits or downs on occasion. And they say things about how bad the Rally dogs are. If you ask them a question about anything, like where they are in the judge, they look at you like you are a bit of poo on their shoe.

The Rally people are fun and helpful to everyone, they are free with advice, and they, in generally are very accomodating when you need to go first or last so you can get your dog through the obedience ring at the same time. There is some fun competitiveness, but most are happy to get a green ribbon and the other colors are just a bonus.

Obedience is a lot easier in some ways. It is always the same, the judge tells you what you are going to do and you listen for the pattern, but everything is really the same, in the same order. I have heard people who have done obedience for years, have trouble with Rally because it is different every time, and they have to go in order, etc. It is not hard if you do the walk through first, and the more times the better, but there are a lot more possibilities on what you might be facing in each leg. Where obedience will be exactly the same.

ETA: As for having a well-trained dog, all of my rally dogs, after getting their titles at about a year of age, I can do nothing with them for months, even years, Ninja -- no training for three years, and she was perfect when I took her out, her obedience was perfect, good with dogs, perfect at the vet, no problems. That is how they all are when I take them out. And I am not out there training ALL OF THEM, all the time. Training is what you put into it, not what you get for it.
 

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Elaine, are you going through a rough time or something?

I have Rally titles and I have obedience titles. I am losing my hearing and for Rally, I don't need to hear. But evenso, I prefer Rally.

The first dog I put through obedience, got a red and two white ribbons on her RN, and three blue ribbons for her CD, with NO EXTRA TRAINING.

So, I just don't agree with you that Rally is a joke.

I do agree that obedience people like you, (see bolded), tend to be snooty towards the Rally people, they make idiotic statements to them at shows, tell them to crate their perfectly behaved dogs, practice in front of the rally rings where dogs are working, rather than in front of their own obedience rings where they don't want to mess up the dogs. Their dogs run out of the rings, and attack dogs on the long sits or downs on occasion. And they say things about how bad the Rally dogs are. If you ask them a question about anything, like where they are in the judge, they look at you like you are a bit of poo on their shoe.

The Rally people are fun and helpful to everyone, they are free with advice, and they, in generally are very accomodating when you need to go first or last so you can get your dog through the obedience ring at the same time. There is some fun competitiveness, but most are happy to get a green ribbon and the other colors are just a bonus.

Obedience is a lot easier in some ways. It is always the same, the judge tells you what you are going to do and you listen for the pattern, but everything is really the same, in the same order. I have heard people who have done obedience for years, have trouble with Rally because it is different every time, and they have to go in order, etc. It is not hard if you do the walk through first, and the more times the better, but there are a lot more possibilities on what you might be facing in each leg. Where obedience will be exactly the same.

ETA: As for having a well-trained dog, all of my rally dogs, after getting their titles at about a year of age, I can do nothing with them for months, even years, Ninja -- no training for three years, and she was perfect when I took her out, her obedience was perfect, good with dogs, perfect at the vet, no problems. That is how they all are when I take them out. And I am not out there training ALL OF THEM, all the time. Training is what you put into it, not what you get for it.
Thank you! Sometimes it takes years to develope this kind of maturity in a person's thinking skills.
 

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I have to say that the majority of rally dogs are not as obedient as you state...I have seen so many dogs in the RE level that walk away from owners and the owner has to repeat heel every second otherwise the dog will get lost in the ring. The issues you have listed are all due to handler error most likely...the reason your dog loses points in rally is because the handler tells it the wrong thing to do, not because the dog doesn't know what to do.

I'm titling in rally and its definitely fun but I will never agree that those dogs are better trained than obedience dogs. Unless that handler is also training for the obedience ring. I'm also talking about majority of dogs...of course there are some in there that are good. But I would bet that 99% of obedience dogs are of much higher level than rally dogs. Also in your example you say your dogs get taken out months/years later. Well guess what, they're older and more mature, you might not be officially working them, but you do train them day to day. A 5 year old dog is much easier to title in obedience than a 1 year old, they're just settled in their ways and everything isn't brand new to them so they don't need to say hello to everything in the building.

I have no issue with rally...I'm going to get my RE and stop. But I'm shocked when there are people in there that are on their 40+ RAE leg. Why not go on to something more challenging? Get other titles? I'll never complain though...at least those people are doing something with their dog and like you said they might have reasons why they can't do obedience or another sport so they focus on this one.

Rally is cool cause you don't have to have your dog 95% or better for the exercises and you could still qualify...so it makes it fun. Although I find it funny when people take dogs into the ring and they won't sit for them no matter how many times they say it (no one would bring a dog like that into an obedience ring) I've also seen a person bring a dog for a CD who wouldn't front and would just run away (they decided they'd take the chance). I think due to the higher risk of non-qualifying in obedience you get people that have dogs that are much more prepared, where as in rally people can generally do it with a pretty good dog (which is what it was meant for).
 

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If you've done your CGC you should look into the Schutzhund BH, then you will be ready to do an AKC CD and CDX. Once you get your SchHBH you can then do the tracking titles (you can do the tracking only titles once you've got your BH). This will probably be a better way to get a tracking title. Around here they hold maybe 2 AKC tracking events every year and the process to enter is really convoluted so most of the time the AKC tracking trials get cancelled since people have a hard time fulfilling the preliminary requirements. There are 2 of us in our DVG club doing the tracking only titles at the moment.
 

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Our GSD club put on an AKC obedience and rally trial this past weekend. It was tons of work, and a lot of fun.

I was ring stewarding for Rally, and our judge was an absolute joy. There were several people with GSDs in Novice B, who had done obedience, but never rally. Every one of them qualified, and they ALL talked about how fun it was.

Of course there were also a few of the hardcore obedience people with several OTCh's under their belts at the trial. They wouldn't be caught dead in rally. Whatever.

I haven't done either one. Years ago I trained my Dobe for a CD, but never competed. I show in conformation, but want to try my hand at obedience and yes, rally too. Am I going to just sort of train my dog so I can doodle around the rally ring? No. I want a dog that is engaged with me, and will happily do what I ask. (I'm watching Michael Ellis' videos for about the millionth time this week...). If I'm going to compete in something, I want to do it well. I just recently discovered that I actually have a competitive streak, LOL.
 

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I really don't want to do Obedience. I like the idea of being active and I think Finn does as well. When it comes to obedience things like long stays or downs, he's just not as responsive as he is when it comes to doing figure 8s or anything where he's allowed to move. I'm not going to put him through something he just doesn't seem to like.
But UDX IS obedience and that is at the top so there are a lot of lower level obedience you have to get through in order to get to the UDX point anyway. You'll have alot of years practicing obedience and trialing in obedience to get the UDX level - and you don't want to do obedience.

I do Rally and Obedience. Next year I want to try to get a BH on Nyxie. We are 1 leg away from our RA and CD titles. I'm not sure if I am going to continue with her towards CDX or not. My younger Aussie is a drivier dog and I think she would be well suited to the higher levels of obedience more so than Nyxie is.

There is Rally, Tracking, Flyball, Agility and Treibball (not sure how to spell that!) as well as Herding that you can look into with your dog. If you don't really like obedience that's cool, there are lots of other events that you can do with your dog. I would love to do Flyball, but no one in my area does it.
 

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Come on, face it people, rally is the seriously dumbed down version of obedience and I wouldn't be caught dead doing it. It came about because people didn't want to spend the time to actually train their dogs to a decent level and this is what they came up with. When I see the level of training on the dogs in rally, I just shake my head and keep going. If they want to believe that rally titles actually mean they have a well trained dog, well, good for them. There's always the hope that rally people will discover that training their dog is fun and raise their standards.

Anyone that thinks obedience is boring is doing it wrong.

The OP was thinking about striving for a UDX which takes a lot of time and dedication and then people suggested rally?! Not even in the same category. That's like someone that wants to race in NASCAR and they buy a Ford Pinto. Two very different things.
 

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Elaine, are you going through a rough time or something? No.

I have Rally titles and I have obedience titles. I am losing my hearing and for Rally, I don't need to hear. But evenso, I prefer Rally. You don't need to hear in obedience either.

The first dog I put through obedience, got a red and two white ribbons on her RN, and three blue ribbons for her CD, with NO EXTRA TRAINING.

So, I just don't agree with you that Rally is a joke. For the vast majority of people in rally, it is a joke.

I do agree that obedience people like you, (see bolded), tend to be snooty towards the Rally people, they make idiotic statements to them at shows, tell them to crate their perfectly behaved dogs, practice in front of the rally rings where dogs are working, rather than in front of their own obedience rings where they don't want to mess up the dogs. Their dogs run out of the rings, and attack dogs on the long sits or downs on occasion. And they say things about how bad the Rally dogs are. If you ask them a question about anything, like where they are in the judge, they look at you like you are a bit of poo on their shoe. See? Now who's snooty?

The Rally people are fun and helpful to everyone, they are free with advice, and they, in generally are very accomodating when you need to go first or last so you can get your dog through the obedience ring at the same time. There is some fun competitiveness, but most are happy to get a green ribbon and the other colors are just a bonus. Obedience people are fun and helpful too, but they are serious about getting their dogs ready for the ring, so sorry if they aren't all jolly with you. Rally people are just happy getting a ribbon, because it was so darn easy to get.

Obedience is a lot easier in some ways. It is always the same, the judge tells you what you are going to do and you listen for the pattern, but everything is really the same, in the same order. I have heard people who have done obedience for years, have trouble with Rally because it is different every time, and they have to go in order, etc. It is not hard if you do the walk through first, and the more times the better, but there are a lot more possibilities on what you might be facing in each leg. Where obedience will be exactly the same. Too funny! Who has trouble doing rally? Nobody, because it's so darn easy.

ETA: As for having a well-trained dog, all of my rally dogs, after getting their titles at about a year of age, I can do nothing with them for months, even years, Ninja -- no training for three years, and she was perfect when I took her out, her obedience was perfect, good with dogs, perfect at the vet, no problems. That is how they all are when I take them out. And I am not out there training ALL OF THEM, all the time. Training is what you put into it, not what you get for it.
If you want to do rally, go for it, but it isn't obedience.
 

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If you want to do rally, go for it, but it isn't obedience.
Elaine, I am glad you aren't going through a bad time or anything.

You do need to hear the judge tell you to go forward, turn left or right, go slow, go fast, about turn, halt. I have trouble hearing in the IX center in Cleveland -- one of the shows I choose to go to. So, you are in fact, wrong.

You are also wrong about Rally.

But I am glad you wouldn't be caught dead doing Rally. I don't think you would fit in.
 

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Come on, face it people, rally is the seriously dumbed down version of obedience and I wouldn't be caught dead doing it. It came about because people didn't want to spend the time to actually train their dogs to a decent level and this is what they came up with.
huh. I don't think there are too many people here who have more obedience experience than I do, and I DO take dogs into rally. Like anything else, it's what you make of it. I like doing a bit of rally because it's a way to introduce a young dog to performance events, and it's a great way to see how your training is going. but I agree that it's not particularly competitive. If you have a dog that is actually trained and you can follow the course without getting lost, then you have a VERY good chance of getting a placement. There seem to be an awful lot of people who equate "fun" with "don't have to actually train."

Anyone that thinks obedience is boring is doing it wrong.
THAT I can agree with. In addition, if your dog finds obedience boring, guess who is boring him? Dogs generally enjoy any activity they are doing with you.
 

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I do agree that obedience people like you, (see bolded), tend to be snooty towards the Rally people,
my trainer (who has multiple obedience titles) says that obedience people have a giant stick up their....

I'm working on both and yes, the rally people are just more fun. I think 90% of the high level obedience people have ulcers because man, are they wound a bit tight. Also, their dogs are very flat because they've sucked all of the fun out of it.

I work our clubs trials every year and we all fight to work the rally ring because the people are so much nicer. No one enjoys stewarding the obedience ring because the people are just horrid.
 
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