German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,

So now it’s been almost 8 months with my boy, I honestly could not afford to train him professionally, some of the topics I read about trainings recommend the obedience training to start at the age of 3 months old, while other topics says 8 months plus.

I want to ask this important question to you GSD owners, is it late for me to get him trained? Until what age is ok to start if late.

Thanks and seeking your advices

T



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
949 Posts
I started obedience training as soon as I brought mine home at 8 weeks. Obedience training isn't just a formal class or something that you can only take with a trainer around, it could be as simple as having him sit, stay, come on YOUR demand. I didn't have a formal training until mine was 10 months. So all obedience training and tricks, I taught him myself. It's definitely do-able even if you're on a budget.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,120 Posts
It's definitely not too late. Go for it. You can train him on your own if you like. There are lots of online resources and books you can read (free at the library) to get you started. Also, if your dog is not aggressive around other dogs, group obedience classes are much cheaper than private lessons. Training your dog is fun and a great bonding experience for you and your dog. Better late than never!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
Dogs can learn at any age. Younger puppies don't have as long an attention span as an adult, so older puppies/adults can be easier to train than puppies. In any case, I agree with sebrench, better late than never!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Many thanks to all. Made me feel better. But I must say he is quite aggressive with other animals.
2 days back I took him to the vet for a general check up and after paying the bill and while leaving, I saw another customer with 2 small toy dogs stepping in, my dog growled like I have never heard him before. He then snapped at them when I had to pull him firmly. So he must get trained to be good with other animals


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,048 Posts
You might train him to behave better around other animals, but good luck training him to be "good with other animals." Often, animal/dog aggression is a genetic trait. My experience is that if a dog is good with other animals you see it from the very beginning, unless the dog was attacked by another dog.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,686 Posts
I understand not being able to hire someone now, but it would be good to find someone in the near future. Yes, you can get tips online but having someone watch you can make a big difference. You have to stop your pup from getting riled up BEFORE it happens. I break a hard stare by walking into my dog and turning them around. Might have to go around 2 or 2 times before my dog would look up at me as if to say, "what are we doing?" and then I reward for the eye contact. Then just keep going as if nothing happened. Take a big calm breath, don't tighten up on the leash or at least pull backwards (that just makes the dog want to go forward even more) and keep moving. Distance is your friend. If you can cross the street or stand off to the side while the other dog passes, it will help until your dog learns that he doesn't need to make a fuss.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,048 Posts
One thing you can do is get a properly sized prong collar that has medium to smaller sized prongs, learn how to fit and put it on correctly and how to deliver a correction. You can use a friend who has a dog or just go where there is a dog in a fenced in area that your dog can see. Start a good distance from the other dog. Slowly heel toward the dog. The instant your dog makes any reaction, tell him "no" and "sit" and give him a correction. If he sits and stops reacting, praise and offer him a small bite of meat about the size of a small crouton. Then heel him a little closer and repeat. Keep gradually moving closer until you sense your dog is becoming too reactive and then back up some and repeat the process. Back up enough to where he seems pretty nonreactive, praise him up a lot, give the release command and take him back to the car or house offering a lot of praise and patting on his side. Over time, if this approach is going to work, you should notice he is less reactive at closer distances. Don't underestimate the time you will have to put into this training. Ideally, you want the other dog to be a dog that you know likes other dogs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,120 Posts
I understand being short on cash, and I think that you can teach a dog basic obedience on your own. I also think that even a few sessions with a professional trainer could really help if you are trying to manage aggression/reactivity issues. If you do look for a trainer, get one experienced with GSDs and/or other working breeds. I would ask on this forum or try to find a local IPO or GSD club.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,464 Posts
It's never too late!

Start today.

There are lots of videos and blogs to follow online, and there are also some very good books that cover theory. If you haven't trained a dog before, buying (or borrowing!) a few good books can help you grasp the terminology that you'll come across in blogs and other online resources.

Take video on your phone, even if it's just for your own knowledge. Set it up across the room and capture yourself and your dog in the screen. You can upload it to YouTube and use the "unlisted" listing category if you don't want your videos to be publicly searchable. That'll free up space on your device to take more clips. Sometimes you'll see things in video that you didn't realize were happening in the moment. Doing that will build a library of video clips you'll have on hand to send to other people for feedback, if you wish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
949 Posts
So basically with dog TRAINING, you absolutely can do it on your own. Dog BEHAVIOUR MODIFICATION, sometimes you need a professional for that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Thank u guys. He listens to me I would say 80%. Sit, up, come teaching him the stay command now. But other gsds I saw they like can’t wait to obey the command of the owner and I find that beautiful. They are just very well behaved and well controlled, don’t get that excited that they jump on owners every time they see em.

For behavior with other animals, I am thinking to visit my friend who has canaan and pharaoh hounds, and just unleash him and see what he does.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
118 Posts
Hey guys,

So now it’s been almost 8 months with my boy, I honestly could not afford to train him professionally, some of the topics I read about trainings recommend the obedience training to start at the age of 3 months old, while other topics says 8 months plus.

I want to ask this important question to you GSD owners, is it late for me to get him trained? Until what age is ok to start if late.

Thanks and seeking your advices

T



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
IT'S NEVER TO LATE=
While very young pups have that learning curve where theypick up a lot if not most of the basics, training is an on-going no matter whatage so don’t be discouraged.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,464 Posts
Thank u guys. He listens to me I would say 80%. Sit, up, come teaching him the stay command now. But other gsds I saw they like can’t wait to obey the command of the owner and I find that beautiful.
A lot of that comes from engagement, which you can work on building, starting today. :) If you do a search for "engagement", you're going to find ideas here as well as links to external blogs. You're basically programming his brain that good things (attention, payment of food/toy, fun things) come from his handler (you).

For behavior with other animals, I am thinking to visit my friend who has canaan and pharaoh hounds, and just unleash him and see what he does.
I wouldn't go that route, IMO. Focus on your relationship with him, and leave other animals out of it for now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
Thank u guys. He listens to me I would say 80%. Sit, up, come teaching him the stay command now. But other gsds I saw they like can’t wait to obey the command of the owner and I find that beautiful. They are just very well behaved and well controlled, don’t get that excited that they jump on owners every time they see em.

For behavior with other animals, I am thinking to visit my friend who has canaan and pharaoh hounds, and just unleash him and see what he does.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
See the books of William Koehler. He trained dogs for movies and required instant and immediate obedience every time because there were always a whole lot of expensive people and equipment waiting to get the shot right.

It's a pretty simple process. One of the basics is to train them to pay attention to only you. Take them for a walk on a semi-loose leash and suddenly change direction without notice. If they aren't paying attention to you, they get jerked into compliance.

As with all the other things, repeat 1,000 times. That's the hard part.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Thanks. I will try this out. I forgot to mention, it is very rare and hard for him to obey a command I give him if I do not have a treat or food with me and that is after he sniffs it and knows what it is.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top