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While many dog foods use cornmeal (yellow dent corn - field corn), what nutritive and antioxidant powers are left in the cornmeal once the corn germ is removed? And with what is left after cooking, can it really provide any real nutritional value?

From https://www.usaemergencysupply.com/information_center/all_about_grains/all_about_grains_corn.htm

"The cornmeal you buy in the store is also most likely made from yellow dent corn. However, nutritionally speaking, there's a big difference between the corn meal you can buy in the store and freshly ground corn meal you grind yourself at home. There's a couple of reasons for this. In store-bought corn flour or meal, the outer skin (a great source of fiber) and the germ which is loaded with nutrients has been removed. The grain millers particularly like to remove the germ as it contains the oils that quickly go rancid - something they don't want to happen before you get their cornmeal home and used. Unfortunately, it also contains many of the vitamins and minerals that make corn so healthy. And just like white wheat flour, because they have taken so many nutrients out during the milling process, they'll chuck some cheap, un-chelated minerals back in to make it look like the customer is buying a healthy product."

So does that mean the splitting seen in some dog foods that include corn germ meal mean they are trying to get the nutritive value back in the product from what is lost by just using plain cornmeal?

And does the cancer fighting study some have posted about that was based on corn (not cornmeal) translate to cornmeal used in dog food? And if so, how much nutritive value is left once made into a meal and cooked?
 

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I don't think your question can be answered exactly, but no corn meal in dog food and human food is not as nutritious as eating whole corn. As you read all the vitamins and minerals are striped in this process negating any cancer fighting agents found in whole uncooked corn. The same goes for any vegetable cooked but especially corn meal which has little nutritional value to begin with. Heat breaks down vitamins and minerals which is why eating raw or lightly steamed veggies is more healthy. I would look for a food without corn and instead look for brown rice and other healthy grains if your going to feed a food with grains:)
 

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Yeah, that is what I was thinking after doing some of my own research here lately. And I never could find anything on canine cancer and corn helping with that or fight against it. Just a study about humans - not sure you could assume it would translate.

And if you have to add stuff back in, well then it probably is just a filler to make kibble.

Another definition I was trying to find was Rice Flour from AAFCO but couldn't find it - I did find one at rice flour Definition in the Food Dictionary at Epicurious.com that said it was made from white rice, which as we know is not as nutritious as brown rice for similar reasons. So probably not the best option for rice in a food either.

Oh well, we have been raw on and off but now on for good after getting our rescue Jack who has seizures at times. He has made me realize I need to really watch everything that goes in their bodies. And for him fresh really is best and what I can trust to provide the best nutrition for him.
 
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