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Discussion Starter #1
Ok me and Xena just seem to have all sorts of issues at times. Ms. Xena is almost 10 months old now. Since December so since she was about 4 months old we have been going to training; at first every weekend and then every other weekend. She is fine with those dogs at training. She ignores them. The neighborhood dog she doesn't like and he doesn't like her. He has never liked her since the night she was brought home. He isn't mine but he always came out to the house and followed me around when I was outside. She growls and barks whenever he comes into the yard. 99.9 % they are seperate and can not get to each other.

Flash forward to tonight. Xena and I are walking and training at the same time. We walk past the neighbor's trailer like we do every day. He has 2 adult hound dogs he keeps in the bottom below his trailer..they and Xena can not get to each other. He has a puppy he is out walking. We are walking in different directions. Xena is on my left walking nicely; the puppy is on a leash not walking nicely but at least 15 foot away. Xena goes nuts; barking, lunging acting crazy. She has never done this except with the wandering dog (Cooter). I was giving corrections on the prong collar and I kept walking away. We got back in our yard and she calmed down and I told her to leave the puppy alone and not bark at it.

We trained for a few minutes and went back to walking and went past the fenced in dogs on the bottom and she started barking, growling at that dog. To be fair he was howling at her first I guess. I gave correction and kept on walking.

Is she all of a sudden being dog reactive? I don't think I telegraphed anything to her; I mean it was a puppy. Cooter-the dog she doesn't like nor any of the other dogs-including the dogs of his former owners lol.-is something of hound mix. Could she be reactive to just one type of dog? I don't go back to my trainer until 2nd Saturday in June.

Sorry for the long post. Once again I do thank you all for your help; without this forums suggestions me and Xena would be much unhappier. I mean otherwise she's doing real good I think.
 

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She has to learn to ignore other dogs or to look but not react. Keep walking her by the dogs at a distance where she can see them but not reach them. Stop her before she barks if you can. Eventually it will become no big deal to her.
 

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I don't know if this is the case or not but what I have found with my dog is that the other dogs that live in our street are the ones he hates/dislikes the most.
I have managed to train out almost all of his reactivity, we can walk past dogs on the same footpath as us without him reacting... but if it is the dogs that live in our street, I can't walk past them even on the other side of the road without my dog barking at them.
He never gets to see the other dogs as they are all in fenced yards, but he will know them by smell and sound.
I think its very odd that he reacts only to them now.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It was just such strange behavior from her. At training the dogs are a lot closer to her and she ignores them I guess I just expected her to do that with all dogs. Xena has certainly been a learning experience.
 

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With my previous dog, a rescue at 1 1/2 yrs old, she was unable to not react initially to any dog barking at her. I had to move, from a country setting to a major city when she was about 3 yrs old. So at that point, for the first time ever, she had to be leashed and learn to heel. I used to walk her intentionally by dogs that were very reactive behind an open chain link fence...for training. Took her about 3-4 wks of this to be able to ignore them and focus on my commands. We did it almost daily for another couple weeks, stopping and working on basic obedience commands next to these reactive dogs, for her to get that they didn't matter. But get it she did. We'd stop right next to the fence with these dogs going nuts at her, and work on sits and downs and stays and comes. After that for her entire life she was immune to any heckling another dog might come up with. It's a process, not a race...takes time and patience, and consistency. But if you spend the time, your dog will learn...just don't expect too much from a 10 m old puppy >:)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I do the same thing at home that I do at training. I don't use treats; just praise. After we get finished training she gets her ball.
 

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With my boy's reactivity, I found that he was as yours is while in class as opposed to when just out and about. I believe that this was due to kind of a group mentality. In class, all the dogs had clear understanding of behavior expectation and the consequences of not acting appropriately. It took most dogs just one or two classes to "get it". But when out and about, it isn't structured, too many wild cards and the trainer isn't there. My boy knew this so it took a bit of practise while on my own to keep the rules very clear to him.

That said, please don't use someone else's out of control dog and property line to practice. Just keep walking. Walking by on a normal daily walking route is one thing, but stopping at or going back and forth is another.

How would your feel if that was done to you. With all the hard work that me and my boy have put in to getting him well behaved, I would be ticked off. I would not think "this is a great opportunity to reinforce my dog's behavior" not one bit and I would probably come out and have a discussion with the person doing it.

The old adage do to others as you would want done to you is tried and true wisdom.
 

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I do the same thing at home that I do at training. I don't use treats; just praise. After we get finished training she gets her ball.
Grab his attention before he sees the dogs. Coming up to the house, reward the ball for looking at you. My dog male has some issues with other dogs. So I started out using the ball on a rope, tugging and playing as we went by other dogs. Then using the ball as a focal point by dogs. Then adding a command. Going from there.
Well, that's what helped me. And a slip lead.
 

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With my boy's reactivity, I found that he was as yours is while in class as opposed to when just out and about. I believe that this was due to kind of a group mentality. In class, all the dogs had clear understanding of behavior expectation and the consequences of not acting appropriately. It took most dogs just one or two classes to "get it". But when out and about, it isn't structured, too many wild cards and the trainer isn't there. My boy knew this so it took a bit of practise while on my own to keep the rules very clear to him.

That said, please don't use someone else's out of control dog and property line to practice. Just keep walking. Walking by on a normal daily walking route is one thing, but stopping at or going back and forth is another.

How would your feel if that was done to you. With all the hard work that me and my boy have put in to getting him well behaved, I would be ticked off. I would not think "this is a great opportunity to reinforce my dog's behavior" not one bit and I would probably come out and have a discussion with the person doing it.

The old adage do to others as you would want done to you is tried and true wisdom.
I use the out of control fence fighters in the dog park to proof Inga past. Nothing wrong with it. She became dog reactive at the dog park before I knew any better. She got over it there too (outside the fence). Like Tim said, its a long process.
 

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Out side the fence of a public dog park is a great place to train as it is public and you are not targeting the use of any specific dog that is reacting on his own property. That was what I was referring to. ;-)
 

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I was told in obedience class that correcting a dog with prong if he pulls towards other dogs, may create reactivity.
Because they associate the sight of another dog with physical discomfort, they get wound and anxious whenever they see another dog.

Rather than associating the sight of other dogs with discomfort and correction, I agreed with her that they should learn to associate passing other dogs onleash with:
- paying attention to their owner
- overall, a state of mental relaxation & pleasant expectation
- getting a treat

Anyway her philosophy worked with our dog (took a few months to sink in).
He passes calmly, he checks in with me instead of fixating on the other dog, and if the other dog is calm & friendly, we sometimes let them greet briefly. (Also, I don't have to treat every time now, I'll do it once in a while)

What I liked most about this approach is that instead of managing/controlling/correcting my dog, it actually changed his mental attitude and state of mind! So it was like a gentle "cure" rather than a "management/handling method"...
 

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I have just my one boy's experiences with GSD reactivity (7yrs old soon) so take it with a grain of salt, but what I have learned from him with the use of both prong, praise and treats is that:

Timing is everything when giving a collar correction. Too late and it will amp him up.

Collar correction when timed perfectly, perfectly made it very clear to him that I was the cause of discomfort and yes it is sometimes warrented. Learning his body signals for that perfect timing took some practice. That said, I realized that he needed way more positive experiences and success than he did corrections so I went to places where I could control distance.

"What I liked most about this approach is that instead of managing/controlling/correcting my dog, it actually changed his mental attitude and state of mind! So it was like a gentle "cure" rather than a "management/handling method"..."

What you just said concerning about mental attitude, Imho, is huge for success. As is clear and concise correctionswhen needed (not just collar pops but also through verbal commands).

Another component of of my own learning curve was the need to be absolutely truthful with myself about my own comfort and confidence level. Those two issues are brought up enough in these forums but not so much as the dog's issues. If a person is one who is likely to react out of fear, the dog will probably follow suit. I had to get a grip on myself as I was helping him through his issues.

Op, if you can avoid walking your dog past that trailer, i.e. Drive instead. I would do that at least for a while to allow your pup's body to get back to normal. With every reactive episode, a dog is flooded with hormones (I believe it is cortisol) and it takes about 4 days (I believe) for the system to clear. I had a recent episode with an aggressive dog and my boy and I started slipping backwards so we took a break from our normal routes (fence fighters, window pounders, etc where he was beautifully ignoring for a few yrs now) and drive to places conducive to easy going successful outings.

Sorry for the length but hopefully just some extra info that may help.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
It's my driveway that I'm walking on and then that leads up to the hollar road. My dog get car sick so all of our walks have to be close to home. Yesterday we walked past everything and she was fine; but the puppy wasn't out. We've been walking out like this since it started warming up and getting light enough for both of us to see. She has barked at the dogs in the fence before but we just keep walking and she's been fine.

I guess maybe it was the puppy that cause the issue; not sure. The puppy that the neighbor isn't suppose have *rolls eye*; his landlord isn't happy about the puppy lol.

This is kind of similar to when she had that issue with my nephew's bicycle.
 

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Update:: we have been working on this and we have some progress. Tonight we walked on our driveway with the other dogs barking at her. She just stared at them no barking. I kept talking to her and kept moving. Last night she barked some at them.

We are getting better. She’s still young in large dog years.
 
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