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I am curious to hear from people who have or have had an intact male in the house with a bitch in season. Can it be done, or does one of them have to be moved somewhere temporarily? I know it would somewhat depend on the individual dogs, but I'd like to hear what it was like for people?

If there is more than one male, I have heard this is when they will really want to fight? Can this be prevented?

Do you think it is cruel to subject an intact male to up close and personal female in heat when he can't breed her?

When my goats were in season not every buck got to breed-- some were related or not the right match so I used a different buck, and they just had to suck it up and not get any, and they also had to live in an electric pen while the girls were in season because I couldn't keep the bucks in regular fencing when there was a girl in season

I have a friend with an intact male and female of a different breed. They have a big property and an RV. The husband takes the male to stay in the RV but she said that he is a still a nightmare even though they aren't that close.
 

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Carly and Sage were both intact (being shown) and lived with Russ who was also intact. It was fine when he was young. I would crate and rotate, and could separate them on two ends of the house. Sometimes I had the luxury of sending one of the dogs to my breeders house for awhile. The dog that got to go LOVED going there, so I never felt bad about it. Yes, there was lots of moaning and wailing. He would stop eating and lose weight. Since there were TWO girls going into heat at two separate times, it was a bit harder on him.

But when Russ hit 3 years old, he was insufferable. It went beyond the usual wailing, and refusing to eat. He started growling at me. That was it. Neutered. Problem solved. At 5 years old, he lives with one intact girl (Scarlet), and doesn’t seem to remember what all the fuss was about.

It can absolutely be done if you are vigilant. How easy it is just depends on the dog!
 

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I have an intact male sheltie, I also have 3 intact females, 2 shelties 1 GSD, permanent residents. Then I have the guide dog puppies we raise(1 at a time) they are intact while we have them until 12-14 months old, sometimes we get a male sometimes female, at this moment we have a male standard poodle. My son also visits with his intact standard poodle.


I am sure it probably depends on the breed, When Dusty (sheltie) was younger, he is 12 now, he would go off his food for a bit, and whine a lot, now it doesn't bother him as much. Also with him he never seems to be interested in Zelda, he will sniff her a bit when she is in standing heat, but never tries anything. apparently he only likes other shelties LOL! The 2 standard poodles have to be kept separate from the girls when anyone is in heat, never had a problem with them fighting even when I had all 3 intact males at my house with Zelda in full blown heat!


Oh and just for the record I have never had an accidental litter.
 

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My male was a rescue, so was neutered after 3 years of age. When one of my girls came into season, I had to treat him as if he was intact. It usually wasn't too bad until they hit their receptive period, and then if I didn't separate them, he'd climb aboard and tie with them.

So, it was crate and rotate, until the heat was nearly over! During the time I had him, I had 3 different intact females. Even a couple of weeks before I had to have him euthanized at age 14, he was STILL trying to 'go through the motions' with my in-season girl! :rolleyes2:

Of course, I never had to worry about an 'oops' litter, but there was still the chance someone could have been hurt if the female wasn't willing. Happy to report no one ever got hurt!
 

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I think it depends on the male. The few males I have had were a bit of a PITA but nothing to serious. I have heard of and seen boys that got downright nasty about it though.
Bud was intact all his life. I got teeth chattering, a bit of drooling, incessant whining and a few times a stubborn growl when I was removing him.
I think it's a bit stressful but not to the point of being harmful. I always double up on doors during. So each dog in a crate, in a room, door closed when not supervised and zero contact. I don't walk them together or allow them to be in the yard or house areas together. I think that may help because there is no direct contact to amp them up.
 

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I had a friend with intact dogs the male would always loose a bit of weight there was some amount of stress there. Crate and rotate for three weeks every 6 months and it became a routine. I heard neutered dogs can also have their urges also although thankfully I have not seen that. Last heat Luna stood for max and he just grumbled at her. The only male suitor we had at our house was a neutered male shepherd from down the block. He was old and had trouble getting around to.
 

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I do. TJ is fairly good though, even at 4. The first 10 days aren't bad (and life continues fairly normally with some extra rules), it is the last 10-14. My husband and I sleep in separate rooms during those days. TJ's whining gets annoying for sure. But he doesn't go off his food. And he will sleep at night. They are both often crated next to each other for long periods throughout her heat cycle- WITH SUPERVISION of course while I am at work. Paisley allows zero funny business around food, even when she is flagging which helps.
 

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Ive been researching a few sites and have seen birth control pills for dogs has anyone tried these or recommended if they are ok to use?
 

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I had Donovan until he was 4.5. He used to moan like he was dying when the girls, mostly his sister, were in their prime. He would be quiet if told. Never tried to break out of his crate though I did have extra locks on it. Females crated in another room with a door. If I left either he went outside in the kennel, he went with me or the female went with me.

I have known males, though, that wouldn't eat, couldn't think, destroyed crates, some that couldn't even work. I have known very strong good breeding dogs that could trial with females and be next to them in a trailer and never have a problem.
 

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I had Donovan until he was 4.5. He used to moan like he was dying when the girls, mostly his sister, were in their prime. He would be quiet if told. Never tried to break out of his crate though I did have extra locks on it. Females crated in another room with a door. If I left either he went outside in the kennel, he went with me or the female went with me.

I have known males, though, that wouldn't eat, couldn't think, destroyed crates, some that couldn't even work. I have known very strong good breeding dogs that could trial with females and be next to them in a trailer and never have a problem.
And do people think a dog is less than if he is a nightmare around a bitch in heat?

I heard someone say that one of their pre requisites for staying intact was that the dog didn't lose his head

Do other people feel that way?
 

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And do people think a dog is less than if he is a nightmare around a bitch in heat?

I heard someone say that one of their pre requisites for staying intact was that the dog didn't lose his head

Do other people feel that way?
The organization where I work frowns upon this. A bit of a unique situation but it may apply elsewhere. Since we breed our dogs for guidework, chances are that a male who is difficult to manage, even tho it’s heat specific, could pass other undersirable temperament traits on to his offspring. Control issues, too much intensity, high distractability, strong scent interest, marking, etc.

That said, it’s a judgement call ultimately... sometimes we really want a particular dog because of its pedigree, in that case, I don’t know how the breeding department conducts the pairings to increase chances of a successful outcome. They can be a nightmare to kennel tho. Eek.
 

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If a dog can't work because there might be a female at home in heat, or one is nearby, or one has been on the field, that male is rather useless. They should have good drive to breed, but they also should have the drives to work. Missing a couple of meals or having to contain them elsewhere when the female is prime for breeding isn't a big deal. Inuring themselves or having screaming diarrhea for days, or losing their minds is a big deal for a working dog.
 
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