German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 20 of 41 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,762 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I was going to have to go to town today because Inga is out of dog food.

Then she took care of today's needs herself. She caught a rabbit and ate it. >:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,126 Posts
Your food problems are solved! Inga the mighty huntress! When I think of all those rabbits killed and left his kills for me to dispose of, I should have ran out of his food instead :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,762 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I was at the store the next day and an old guy was in the isle getting canned dog food. I told him about Inga's kill and he said Too bad they don't have canned rabbit in here.

Inga catches and consumes cotton rats, field mice and rabbits. Although she has been strickly taught no crittering. No crittering on calves, deer, chickens, wild water fowl. But with this rodent hunting- she stalks, freezes looking hard into the grass, then jumps high in the air and comes down on it with her front feet just like a wolf. With the rabbits, the first time I saw her she was running across the hill top speed in the dark. Then I saw the flash of a white cotton tail. The passion! Can you imagine what that is like for her? I let her do it, no correction.

Oh, and you are not getting the prey away from her either. She will not come, She will not Off, she will not drop it, no way. She gobbles it like a wild animal and eats every bit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,423 Posts
I don't care for the boasting of killing wild animals on this forum lately either, it's disturbing. Your dog doesn't listen to you... won't recall... won't drop it... what's the difference between that little rabbit and a kitten? Or a small dog? What if a lost child wandered onto your property? Not to mention in most places it's very illegal for dogs to chase wildlife. If you're raising the rabbits specifically for meat I get it.... but when your dog is out of control scary things can happen. What if the neighbor has laid out poison that the mice have consumed?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,073 Posts
I don't care for the boasting of killing wild animals on this forum lately either, it's disturbing. Your dog doesn't listen to you... won't recall... won't drop it... what's the difference between that little rabbit and a kitten? Or a small dog? Not to mention in most places it's very illegal for dogs to chase wildlife. If you're raising the rabbits specifically for meat I get it.... but when your dog is out of control scary things can happen. What if the neighbor has laid out poison that the mice have consumed?
I find it very disturbing as well. It is not why I come to a German Shepherd forum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,327 Posts
Dogs are predators. As much as you'd like to sanitize it and deny it it's true. And sometimes, no matter HOW much training you do, instinctive behaviour is going to triumph over training.

Here's an article written by the two researchers that popularized B.F. Skinner's theory of operant conditoning, which now forms the basis for almost all animal training. It describes how impossible it is to overcome instinctive behaviour in some animals.

Classics in the History of Psychology -- Breland & Breland (1961)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
307 Posts
Wow!

I was going to have to go to town today because Inga is out of dog food.

Then she took care of today's needs herself. She caught a rabbit and ate it. >:)
THAT is IMPRESSIVE!

I have read the comments from people none too pleased about this, but maybe we should trust the Nurse's dog to know prey animals from not-prey animals. It's not killing kittens, cats, or other wandering pets (who truly should NOT be wandering in the 1st place).

Remember how people who don't do schutzhund might say things like "Aren't you training your dog to be vicious? What if a little child gets in your yard? Isn't your schutz-thing irresponsible?"

Then you have to go and explain how it actually improves self-control and confidence and etc etc etc.

Please don't go crazy with what-if's here. I don't think this dog is going into bloodsport-mode. It ATE THE RABBIT. If it starts catching and killing but not eating rabbits, maybe Nurse Bishop will worry. Maybe she'll save the carcasses and feed them to the dog later. That's not a problem now and may never be.

Wow, that German Shepherd CAUGHT A RABBIT.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,423 Posts
Dogs are predators. As much as you'd like to sanitize it and deny it it's true. And sometimes, no matter HOW much training you do, instinctive behaviour is going to triumph over training.

Here's an article written by the two researchers that popularized B.F. Skinner's theory of operant conditoning, which now forms the basis for almost all animal training. It describes how impossible it is to overcome instinctive behaviour in some animals.

Classics in the History of Psychology -- Breland & Breland (1961)
German shepherds were not designed to be hunting dogs, if that's your intent why didn't you get a beagal or some other hound dog? I just don't understand why this is here instead of say a hunting dog forum. Lots of people on here who don't like to read about killing of innocent animals... I have no doubt my dog INSTINCTUALLY wants to kill wild animals, he has a very high prey drive, higher than most dogs I've ever seen. But I have successfully trained him not to because I don't allow it.
It is not impressive to me or should be a proud moment when your dog ignores a recall and outright disobeys all your commands.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,073 Posts
The "brags" about it are what people find disturbing, not the act.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,327 Posts
What I find disturbing is people trying to pretend dogs are 'kids with fur'. This is a pet peeve of mine, and I have to confess some of the comments in this thread 'pushed my buttons'. A lot of problems with behaviour could be solved by honouring the dog for WHAT IT IS, not what we'd like it to be (usually a child substitute.)

Yes, I know prey drive can be a problem, and I don't encourage it. But my younger dog presented me with half a black squirrel the other day. I am not going to try to police her every second she's out playing in the back yard. Of course, if I see her go after a small animal, I WILL try to stop her. She can learn - she and the cat get along just fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,902 Posts
Dogs are predators. As much as you'd like to sanitize it and deny it it's true. And sometimes, no matter HOW much training you do, instinctive behaviour is going to triumph over training.

Here's an article written by the two researchers that popularized B.F. Skinner's theory of operant conditoning, which now forms the basis for almost all animal training. It describes how impossible it is to overcome instinctive behaviour in some animals.

Classics in the History of Psychology -- Breland & Breland (1961)
Interesting. My dogs can both be called out of prey. From deer carcasses to running rabbits. But then again, if you have an article from 1961 (we've come a long way in understanding animal behavior in the past 57 years)....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,073 Posts
What I find disturbing is people trying to pretend dogs are 'kids with fur'. This is a pet peeve of mine, and I have to confess some of the comments in this thread 'pushed my buttons'. A lot of problems with behaviour could be solved by honouring the dog for WHAT IT IS, not what we'd like it to be (usually a child substitute.)

Yes, I know prey drive can be a problem, and I don't encourage it. But my younger dog presented me with half a black squirrel the other day. I am not going to try to police her every second she's out playing in the back yard. Of course, if I see her go after a small animal, I WILL try to stop her. She can learn - she and the cat get along just fine.
Agreed, mother nature can be cruel. It is what it is.

Thank you for not bragging about your dog's escapade, much appreciated.
 
  • Like
Reactions: LuvShepherds

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,491 Posts
Oh, and you are not getting the prey away from her either. She will not come, She will not Off, she will not drop it, no way. She gobbles it like a wild animal and eats every bit.
That worries me a lot. What if she gets something that she should not have and you can’t get it away from her in time? Why is she so hungry that she must gobble every bite? Is her current diet deficient? What if her prey is a cat or a poisoned rat? My older one is more challenging but my WL I have had from a puppy will always stop eating anything if I command him to. I had to teach that for emergencies. My friend’s dogs would never eat a cat, but once a few years ago they got into a pack frenzy and killed one that got stuck on her property. She was heartbroken. Her dogs are well trained and usually Out, but they were in a pack mindset and lost focus on her. She is a trainer and she told me it was a massive failure. She never let it happen again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,423 Posts
What I find disturbing is people trying to pretend dogs are 'kids with fur'. This is a pet peeve of mine, and I have to confess some of the comments in this thread 'pushed my buttons'. A lot of problems with behaviour could be solved by honouring the dog for WHAT IT IS, not what we'd like it to be (usually a child substitute.)

Yes, I know prey drive can be a problem, and I don't encourage it. But my younger dog presented me with half a black squirrel the other day. I am not going to try to police her every second she's out playing in the back yard. Of course, if I see her go after a small animal, I WILL try to stop her. She can learn - she and the cat get along just fine.
I agree with you, the fur baby thing annoys me too but at the same time.... A dog is not a fur baby but it is also not a WILD animal, dogs are domesticated they do not need to catch their own food because we provide it for them. There needs to be a balance. If your dog kills a squirrel out of your line of sight you don't scold the dog because you weren't there to command it, at the same time you don't praise the dog because you feed it plenty of food and it has no need to be killing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,073 Posts
That worries me a lot. What if she gets something that she should not have and you can’t get it away from her in time? Why is she so hungry that she must gobble every bite? Is her current diet deficient? What if her prey is a cat or a poisoned rat? My older one is more challenging but my WL I have had from a puppy will always stop eating anything if I command him to. I had to teach that for emergencies. My friend’s dogs would never eat a cat, but once a few years ago they got into a pack frenzy and killed one that got stuck on her property. She was heartbroken. Her dogs are well trained and usually Out, but they were in a pack mindset and lost focus on her. She is a trainer and she told me it was a massive failure. She never let it happen again.
The bolded caught my eye as well. I would be very concerned with my dog's diet if one of them were to kill and gobble down a prey animal to the exclusion of obedience and commands.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,491 Posts
The bolded caught my eye as well. I would be very concerned with my dog's diet if one of them were to kill and gobble down a prey animal to the exclusion of obedience and commands.
Also, if they are on the edge, that much uncontrolled pure meat can give them pancreatitis. I just went through a digestive ilness a few months ago with my female and pancreatitis was one thing the vet ruled out. She had a wild adventure and the vet was very worried she might have eaten a wild animal. But she wasn’t gone that long and I checked the area, no carcass, no blood on her.
 
1 - 20 of 41 Posts
Top