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Moms - I deleted the whole thing because you had so much formatting in there, I could not find the link when in Edit mode. Please repost with a minimum of formatting, and ABSOLUTELY NO Soliciting links or mentions.

All members should be aware that we strictly enforce the no-soliciting rule, no exceptions.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Oh wow!
I'm so sorry!
I just copied and pasted the announcement from my email.

I'll look for it else where and then post it.

My apologies,
Moms :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Testing Strategies to Treat
Drug-Resistant Hemangiosarcomas
Erin B. Dickerson, PhD, University of Minnesota
Hemangiosarcoma is a common and deadly tumor of dogs. Growing in areas with a rich blood supply, such as the spleen or heart, many dogs die suddenly, secondary to massive blood loss when tumors rupture. Hemangiosarcomas also are quick to spread to other areas of the body, so even when tumors are discovered early, the tumors have already spread. Prognosis for this cancer hasn't improved in nearly two decades, and new treatment options are desperately needed.
University of Minnesota felt that by gaining a better understanding of the underlying biology of this aggressive tumor, they could discover new ways of improving long-term prognosis in dogs with hemangiosarcoma. Their targets were cells important in tumor growth, spread and drug responses.
The research team successfully identified a drug-resistant cell population within hemangiosarcoma tumors that my be an important player in chemotherapy resistance. The cells identified are extremely efficient at isolating cancer drugs in compartments called lysosomes. By trapping the drug within lysosomes, cancer cells were able to prevent the chemotherapy from reaching its target, effectively neutralizing the drug. This new information helps explain why some hemangiosarcoma tumors become chemotherapy resistant.
The Minnesota team also found that hemangiosarcoma cells with a high surface expression of a protein called colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R) were the culprits in this process. The lysosomes in the cells with higher expression of CSF-1R were trapping the chemotherapy drug, preventing it from reaching its target, the nucleus of the cancer cells, in sufficient quantities to be effective. The team started searching for a drug that could prevent the accumulation of chemotherapy in the lysosomes, and found that the common beta blocker propranolol was effective in competing with the doxorubicin for lysosomal space. The researchers speculate that if the doxorubicin can't be taken into the lysosome (essentially because propranolol got there first), it will be free to reach its target.
The next research step is to further investigate propranolol and other beta blockers to see if they will work in combination with chemotherapy drugs, and then move to testing this new treatment approach in dogs with hemangiosarcoma.
This study identified a key mechanism in chemotherapy resistance in hemangiosarcoma tumors. Understanding how cancer cells hijack and block drugs from reaching their targets will help researchers develop more effective treatments for this difficult-to-treat cancer in dogs.
 

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eventually they will have to deal with quorum sensing and antoher victory of the "cancer" cells.

heard an interview this morning -- cancer on the rise because of glyphosphate residues in almost every food product in the USA .
Glyphosphate is a chemical in ROUND-UP .
 

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Discussion Starter #9
That could be promising for treatment. Did they say anything about why there is so much of this type of cancer now?
I didn't come across that yet but saw this info on the University Of MN site:

New Chemo Agent Trial:
"We are evaluating a new chemotherapeutic agent for dogs with residual disease of measurable hemangiosarcoma. The new agent is approved for the treatment of patients with metastatic breast cancer and liposarcoma in humans and has shown anticancer effects in healthy animals in the laboratory. This study will measure response to therapy by evaluating changes seen in measurable lesions. The study is also a dose-finding trial to determine the safest dose of the new chemotherapeutic agent which is still effective." https://www.vetmed.umn.edu/centers-programs/clinical-investigation-center/current-clinical-trials/dogs-hemangiosarcoma-new-chemo-agent-trial


and this:
Enrollment for Phase 3
Welcome to Shine On Phase 3 Early Detection and Prevention of Hemangiosarcoma

Purpose "Phase 3 is to determine if a test looking for specific cells in the blood can be used to detect hemangiosarcoma in its earliest stages, before a tumor has formed.

Dogs that have positive test results, and that do not have a detectable tumor, will have the option to receive the experimental drug, eBAT, to determine the drug's potential to prevent progression of disease."
https://www.vetmed.umn.edu/centers-programs/clinical-investigation-center/current-clinical-trials/early-detection-target-hemangiosarcoma-cells-dogs-shine-project
 

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I read the article via your first link earlier and wanted to understand propranolol better so I did some more googling and this article came up about hemangioma infantile. I found it really interesting that though rarely needed, propranolol is used for this also. I wonder if the researchers looked at the success rate of propranolol for this condition in infants and expanded on its use and the how and whys and applied it towards the research for hemangiosarcomas in dogs. It may have no relevancy to this disease but it did make me wonder.

Propranolol is listed towards the bottom of the article.

https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1083849-overview
 
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