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It certainly sounds like you are on the right track. It seems strange to me after how loose I could be around all my other dogs how structured I need to be around Ole. He gets all the love and attention my other dogs got... now it just needs to be as a reward or privileges for following the house rules.

Do you use a place command for your new dog? I have found it really helpful. Whenever I think anything that might trigger Ole (like the doorbell ringing) is about happen, I send Ole to his place. It seems that he is putting in so much mental effort trying to stay in his place that he can not focus as much attention to the trigger. Once the excitement has died down, I let Ole off his place to investigate the situation on his terms.

I think the key for Ole is that I release him rather than him just charging headfirst into something. I think this is based on the premack principle, Ole really really wants to go and see what is happening, but he know he must listen to me before he is released.

Place currently works for low-grade stressors like a delivery person ringing the bell and leaving a package on the porch. But, it is a work in progress for higher-level stressors.

When someone comes to the house. We ask them to call a few minutes before they get here so we can prepare:
1. I get a leash on Ole and send him to his place which is in the far corner of the living room.
2. The doorbell rings. Someone else answers the door while I keep 100% of my attention on the dog.
3. Previously, I have asked the guests to just ignore me and the crazy puppy. If pup is calm, I wait four or five minutes and we go through our greeting ritual. If pup is excited, The guests know to proceed into the kitchen where the pup can hear but not seem them. If pup calms down he is allowed to greet the guests, Otherwise, he is banished to my bedroom.

It is a lot of rigamarole. Based on the progress we have made I am hopeful that a simple place command after the doorbell has rung will be enough to send him to his place when guests arrive.

Place has been very counter-intuitive to me. I thought of place as a version of doggie-jail. It seems to work the exact opposite. It is a safe place where Ole goes. When he is there, he knows he can relax and I (his leader) will handle whatever needs to be handled.

The downside is that it took hours of work to load the place with that level of value. ie, Ole receives a lot of his daily lovin' on his place. Any new chews magically appear on his place when he is not looking. Randomly throughout the day, he is likely to find a high value treat on his place.

It appears to be the emotional equivalently of holding a child's hand when they experience something new. It is not coddling, but they know that everything is going to be ok because mom or dad are there with them.

Good luck. You are not alone in this journey.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Here it sounds like your dog is a female, but then you called the dog a good boy after that?
He is a male and I am always saying she because I just lost our Cheyenne ( female) a few weeks ago. I have to get used to saying He and him! Sorry!
 

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Discussion Starter #23
It certainly sounds like you are on the right track. It seems strange to me after how loose I could be around all my other dogs how structured I need to be around Ole. He gets all the love and attention my other dogs got... now it just needs to be as a reward or privileges for following the house rules.

Do you use a place command for your new dog? I have found it really helpful. Whenever I think anything that might trigger Ole (like the doorbell ringing) is about happen, I send Ole to his place. It seems that he is putting in so much mental effort trying to stay in his place that he can not focus as much attention to the trigger. Once the excitement has died down, I let Ole off his place to investigate the situation on his terms.

I think the key for Ole is that I release him rather than him just charging headfirst into something. I think this is based on the premack principle, Ole really really wants to go and see what is happening, but he know he must listen to me before he is released.

Place currently works for low-grade stressors like a delivery person ringing the bell and leaving a package on the porch. But, it is a work in progress for higher-level stressors.

When someone comes to the house. We ask them to call a few minutes before they get here so we can prepare:
1. I get a leash on Ole and send him to his place which is in the far corner of the living room.
2. The doorbell rings. Someone else answers the door while I keep 100% of my attention on the dog.
3. Previously, I have asked the guests to just ignore me and the crazy puppy. If pup is calm, I wait four or five minutes and we go through our greeting ritual. If pup is excited, The guests know to proceed into the kitchen where the pup can hear but not seem them. If pup calms down he is allowed to greet the guests, Otherwise, he is banished to my bedroom.

It is a lot of rigamarole. Based on the progress we have made I am hopeful that a simple place command after the doorbell has rung will be enough to send him to his place when guests arrive.

Place has been very counter-intuitive to me. I thought of place as a version of doggie-jail. It seems to work the exact opposite. It is a safe place where Ole goes. When he is there, he knows he can relax and I (his leader) will handle whatever needs to be handled.

The downside is that it took hours of work to load the place with that level of value. ie, Ole receives a lot of his daily lovin' on his place. Any new chews magically appear on his place when he is not looking. Randomly throughout the day, he is likely to find a high value treat on his place.

It appears to be the emotional equivalently of holding a child's hand when they experience something new. It is not coddling, but they know that everything is going to be ok because mom or dad are there with them.

Good luck. You are not alone in this journey.
Thank you for your advice and I think that is what they are going to teach us. They said it is not going to make him love visitors but we have to use obedience to be sure he doesn't run up to visitors.
I am so confused. In some posts your dog is a “she.” In others, it’s a “he.” Is the dog male or female? I’m going to back away from posting any more replies until I understand what you are asking for help on. I can’t tell if you are keeping the dog, training it, or returning it. My answers would be different depending on what you decide.
We have decided to keep HIM with lots of training. IT was iffy at first but that is what we decided now. I lost my female Cheyenne weeks ago and am still in the habit of saying she and her.
My dog doesn't like visitors, she can be very reactive with people she doesn't know. I just put her in a secure crate in a back room (definitely not in the same room) when I have people she doesn't know over (which isn't often). I put her in there before they arrive most of the time, which limits the stress and the bother. If you have certain people that are over all the time, take time for them to get to know the dog, go on walks together etc, to get those people to bond with your dog. It will be worth it in the long run.

I'm not really sure what you are saying in your post, are you considering sending him to a board and train? Personally, I would prefer to work with a trainer that came to my home / that I could do day classes with. I think your dog needs some stability, time to settle in to your house, and bond with you and your family. He's only 11 months old, I would avoid any trainers that suggest medications at the first point of contact, it's not a good sign. There is plenty of time to work with him, grow his confidence, make him feel more secure and less fearful, as long as you are committed, and if you can find the means to afford a good trainer that would help a lot!
Home training for this boy!
 

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I think that is what they are going to teach us
If you ever find yourself getting stressed from the seriousness of the situation you can play puppy-pong.

Take two humans and have them sit at opposite sides of a room. Each one has a nice 'place' near them. I like dog pillows for this. Then have the humans take turns calling pup to 'place' on their side of the room. Soon, pup will be running from place to place.... wondering why no one introduced him to this game called 'place' sooner.
 

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I am confused as to why the rescue workers were sticking their face in your dog's face.

Also, something doesn't sit right with a dog being aggressive at the front door when he has only been in the home for a week.

I am glad you are getting a behaviorist onboard to evaluate the dog.

I thought I read somewhere that you thought your dog might be mixed with another breed. Can you provide any pictures of him?
 

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Discussion Starter #26
If you ever find yourself getting stressed from the seriousness of the situation you can play puppy-pong.

Take two humans and have them sit at opposite sides of a room. Each one has a nice 'place' near them. I like dog pillows for this. Then have the humans take turns calling pup to 'place' on their side of the room. Soon, pup will be running from place to place.... wondering why no one introduced him to this game called 'place' sooner.
Sounds good! Thanks!
 
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