German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone. I’m new to IPO training, and have a 12 month old German Shepherd. His line has some working titles in it, and I thought it would be good to get him started in it. He’s very obedient, but has a high drive to play outside so I have a hard time getting his attention to heel. But other than that he is pretty good with obedience training.

I have never had him trained by a professional, nor have I joined a club. Partly because I’m from southern Illinois and there doesn’t seem to be too many clubs around. But I want to join a Schutzhund or GSD club to get him started.

Just thought I’d post here to get some information from you guys! Is he too old? Are there clubs near my area? Any recommendations on what to do?

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,485 Posts
No, he is not to old. Look on germanshepherddog.com for a list of USCA clubs. You can look for DVG clubs too.I'm
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,814 Posts
Not too old. If he has the drives and you have the time, I'd say go for it. Even if all you earn is the BH you've learned a lot about your dog. If you two enjoy it you can keep busy with it for a long time. When you do find a club make sure it is one you enjoy hanging out at because you'll be spending a great deal of time there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
If I have a dog who doesn't have the temperament for protection work, is it acceptable or make sense to pursue BH? Like the original poster here, I am a complete newbie, but very interested in doing more with our dog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,254 Posts
If I have a dog who doesn't have the temperament for protection work, is it acceptable or make sense to pursue BH? Like the original poster here, I am a complete newbie, but very interested in doing more with our dog.

Then Weston would be a great choice for you.

Placer would be one of the closer clubs for you, but when I would go they didn't do any sort of group obedience. It was just open field and you were on your own to learn. They have had a lot of changes lately, but I have stopped training there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,948 Posts
I always encourage everyone to go as far as they can with their first dog. Even if it’s just obedience. You’ll learn a lot that way. Good dogs are easy lol. The hard, difficult dogs is where you learn how to train and handle. Plus the more trial experience you get, the better you become. Learning how to handle a trial field is a skill in itself.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
410 Posts
The old school Germans would tell you that they don't bother training a dog hardly at all till it hits 2-3 years old. They do some basic stuff and work the dog of course. But they "let the dog be a dog" till it's mature and they really know what they have to work with. If I'm not mistaken 1-2 is when most police/military training begins as well.

Point being: No, a year old is not too old to start working for him and learning for you. If you think you're way behind the curve based on the youtube heroes, I ask you to show me what titles or real world accomplishments their dogs have now. (hint: the answer is almost always none).

Good luck & have fun!
 
  • Like
Reactions: Femfa

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
16,941 Posts
I started SchH/IPO with a 2 year old rescue mixed breed. She had spent the first year of her life as a tied dog: within a few months after starting with my club, we got our BH. When I started, I didn't think I'd ever get 50 paces of focused heeling out of her on leash, let alone off leash. She surprised me at how much she was able to do, and your dog may surprise you also.

For the focused heel, just keep working at it: it will take hours and hours of training to get it solid. Don't compare your dog to other dogs. Compare him to the progress you two are making.

Even if your dog isn't fully suited to the work, you learn so much, and the training can only benefit the two of you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Then Weston would be a great choice for you.

Placer would be one of the closer clubs for you, but when I would go they didn't do any sort of group obedience. It was just open field and you were on your own to learn. They have had a lot of changes lately, but I have stopped training there.
I had actually tried to contact the Placer club a number of times. Their website has only email address, after 3 separate email requests, never even got a reply. Their site sort of indicates they aren’t interested in new members. I’m closer to the club in Ione, at Gold Country K9.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,595 Posts
I had actually tried to contact the Placer club a number of times. Their website has only email address, after 3 separate email requests, never even got a reply. Their site sort of indicates they aren’t interested in new members. I’m closer to the club in Ione, at Gold Country K9.
Weston and Elise would be a very good choice to train with, but you'll like Cheri if you go to Ione.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,254 Posts
I had actually tried to contact the Placer club a number of times. Their website has only email address, after 3 separate email requests, never even got a reply. Their site sort of indicates they aren’t interested in new members. I’m closer to the club in Ione, at Gold Country K9.

Well they have had a lot of changes lately, so I am not sure what is going on. Their website always said that about new members, but they always made me feel welcome. We did our bh there. But I went there because of Weston, who I have been working with for ages. I have only met Cheri once when she came out to Placer to work with Weston.

AWDF IPO championship is in Galt in May. Might be something to check out.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
410 Posts
If it makes you feel better, it's been my experience (and I've heard/read the same from many others) that alot if not most IPO clubs are extremely picky about their membership & many (I won't say most on this one but it's common) take the stance of you have to prove to *US* why we would want *YOU*, not the other way around.

When you consider the fact that it's a pretty safe for them to assume any unknown persons reaching out are either A) somebody completely clueless who thinks just because they have a GSD their dog can do the sport (which actually should be generally true but that's a whole nother thread) B) somebody who has a dog that might or does have what it takes, but that person isn't willing or able to invest the time required. Or Both.

The stance makes sense, but it still sucks.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top