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It is awesome that you did this for your friend and the dog. This is not different than introducing any other new dog though. Lots of positive experiences and rewards for good behavior. Depending on how long you have had her, maybe slow things down when it is recent. She lost her best pal in life but you have to show that everything is still OK by providing gentle leadership. If a visitor comes, have her on leash a few minutes before they come. Instruct people beforehand that they need to give you some time to work with her (I have a note on the outside door for that purpose) and to ignore her and avoid looking, touch on talking to her.
So let's say the bell rings : you leash her if she wasn't already, have her sit (so work on obedience) and treats for being quiet. If she does bark, take her back gently but confidently while explaining to your visitor what you are doing. Another way is to manage it for a while by crating her or putting her in another room before you open the door. Realize that her world has been turned upside down but don't spoil her; guide her. Enjoy her. I love this story (do you have another dog?)
 

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It is awesome that you did this for your friend and the dog. This is not different than introducing any other new dog though. Lots of positive experiences and rewards for good behavior. Depending on how long you have had her, maybe slow things down when it is recent. She lost her best pal in life but you have to show that everything is still OK by providing gentle leadership. If a visitor comes, have her on leash a few minutes before they come. Instruct people beforehand that they need to give you some time to work with her (I have a note on the outside door for that purpose) and to ignore her and avoid looking, touch on talking to her.
So let's say the bell rings : you leash her if she wasn't already, have her sit (so work on obedience) and treats for being quiet. If she does bark, take her back gently but confidently while explaining to your visitor what you are doing. Another way is to manage it for a while by crating her or putting her in another room before you open the door. Realize that her world has been turned upside down but don't spoil her; guide her. Enjoy her. I love this story (do you have another dog?)
thank you so much. I will try this. I actually just got her a week ago. I use to have a lab but he passed away a few years ago. all I want is for her to have a good home. This dog meant the world to my friend and now it means the world to me. So this really helps me I appreciate the advice
 

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thank you so much. I will try this. I actually just got her a week ago. I use to have a lab but he passed away a few years ago. all I want is for her to have a good home. This dog meant the world to my friend and now it means the world to me. So this really helps me I appreciate the advice
This is devastating! So sorry for your friend and so sorry this man's loved ones couldn't provide her with a home.

Thank you for taking her in. German Shepherds bond very close to their owners and she must be feeling so lost and alone right now. She must be scared. Life as she knew it is gone and she doesn't know that yet. She just wants her home and best friend back.

Maybe for a couple of weeks it can be just you and her so that the two of you can start forming a bond. Let her get used to her new surroundings. There is plenty of time to introduce her to strangers later. Once she has settled in after a few weeks, maybe you can try again, starting to slowly introduce her to a limited number of people. Reassess how she acts with them and then you can start working on a game plan.
 

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This is devastating! So sorry for your friend and so sorry this man's loved ones couldn't provide her with a home.

Thank you for taking her in. German Shepherds bond very close to their owners and she must be feeling so lost and alone right now. She must be scared. Life as she knew it is gone and she doesn't know that yet. She just wants her home and best friend back.

Maybe for a couple of weeks it can be just you and her so that the two of you can start forming a bond. Let her get used to her new surroundings. There is plenty of time to introduce her to strangers later. Once she has settled in after a few weeks, maybe you can try again, starting to slowly introduce her to a limited number of people. Reassess how she acts with them and then you can start working on a game plan.
thank you for the advice.That’s something I really want to do is just spend time with her alone and have her get use to my place and me. I know it’s a big change for her. I’m a firefighter but my schedule allows me to actually have a pet, that’s the one reason I took her is if I felt I couldn’t take care of her I couldn’t do that to her, but I have a huge support from friends, family and even fire family with her. But I definitely want to take my time with her and make sure she knows she’s loved also
 

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What a wonderful gesture that you took her in and a great tribute to you friendship with her former favorite person.

I've taken in 2 rescued GSDs. Both were terribly traumatized with all the upset in their lives. See my avatar for one.

The other passed at 16 yrs. old after we had 14 wonderful years together.

What I did with both, after they calmed down and lost most of their anxiety- which can take weeks or months depending on the dog, was I would take them out in public to a fairly busy store or big box like Walmart- that had a bench out front.

We'd just sit there and watch the world (people) go by. Most people didn't approach but if they did I asked them to approach slowly and I watched carefully for my dog's reaction. If it upset her, I'd signal them to back off. After some time
doing this both dogs learned to accept strange people and children coming close and eventually learned to enjoy it.
Keep everything low stress and slow. If dog gets stressed, slow down.

Sometimes we just parked in a supermarket parking lot and watched. Some dogs have had little socialization so you have to gauge what they can handle.
Take everything in baby steps.
Wouldn't hurt to start doing some basic obedience w/ her, after she's started to bond more to you. GSDs are so smart
and love to perform with all positive training. She will amaze you at how smart she is and until we ask for this and train for this, we may not even know how smart they are. They have an amazing brain to learn with.

Good Luck in your satisfying journey. PS/ We LOVE pictures to go with the story.
 

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What a wonderful gesture that you took her in and a great tribute to you friendship with her former favorite person.

I've taken in 2 rescued GSDs. Both were terribly traumatized with all the upset in their lives. See my avatar for one.

The other passed at 16 yrs. old after we had 14 wonderful years together.

What I did with both, after they calmed down and lost most of their anxiety- which can take weeks or months depending on the dog, was I would take them out in public to a fairly busy store or big box like Walmart- that had a bench out front.

We'd just sit there and watch the world (people) go by. Most people didn't approach but if they did I asked them to approach slowly and I watched carefully for my dog's reaction. If it upset her, I'd signal them to back off. After some time
doing this both dogs learned to accept strange people and children coming close and eventually learned to enjoy it.
Keep everything low stress and slow. If dog gets stressed, slow down.

Sometimes we just parked in a supermarket parking lot and watched. Some dogs have had little socialization so you have to gauge what they can handle.
Take everything in baby steps.
Wouldn't hurt to start doing some basic obedience w/ her, after she's started to bond more to you. GSDs are so smart
and love to perform with all positive training. She will amaze you at how smart she is and until we ask for this and train for this, we may not even know how smart they are. They have an amazing brain to learn with.

Good Luck in your satisfying journey. PS/ We LOVE pictures to go with the story.
thank you so much I will definitely try that.She is still nervous aboig things and I know she’s taking in all the new living. She’s calm and caring I can feel it. I feel bad because her whole life has been turned upside down but I know it will all get better. Thank you for your advice I’ll definitely try that
 

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It's the little things you can do to build a bond with her.
Like this: Get down on her level, sit on floor or stretch out on floor with her. Talk softly, let her rest her head on you while
you gently rub or scratch hidden spots. My rescue loves for me to be on floor with her. Guess it's not as intimidating.

And talk, talk, talk to her. Doesn't matter what you say but your tone and just words tell her you're communicating with her.
Pretty soon she'll pick up on phrases you say. Like, let's go for walk, let's get in the car, let's go feed the horses, so and so (name) is coming to visit, wanna go get the mail? and on and on. Have conversations with her. Get your bone, go
get your monkey. Let's go to bed. Wanna go OUT? They WILL learn these words.

She a beautiful dog and I'm sure she's very bright. She'll be a wonderful companion for you. Best of Luck to you both!
 
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