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I'm getting a 9week old female GSD on Friday. Never owned a GSD before. Any tips. I've raised an APBT, great breed with a bad rep. Turned out to be a big, sweetest, baby ever and has never had a bad run-in with any dog or person. Looking forward to my new little girl. Her name is gonna be June. Any tips are greatly appreciated!
 

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I love APBT favorite dogs! gsds are great dogs and very smart :) socilize and classes are great :) its the normal lol they are little handfulls
 

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Hope you're in for a handful because you're about to get one, but it's worth every second. Have plenty of toys ready. Do you have a crate? Sign up for puppy classes once your pup has enough of his shots to go. Socialize, socialize, and socialize some more. And have fun and enjoy her while she's small and fluffy because it does not last long at all and have plenty of patience. Last and most important, have fun.
 

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Everyone's got the right of it. Also, crate training is an invaluable tool, I am not sure if you did this with your APBT, but it helps a lot with housebreaking, as well as keeping puppy out of trouble when you're not able to be there to supervise.

Also, CHEW toys. Lots of 'em. Kong toys to stuff and freeze are great, especially while pup is teething. Also, GSD pups chew chew chew chew chew nip chew nip nip chew, for the most part, so that's another reason to have lots for them to gnaw on.

Other than that? HAVE FUN! Play, socialize, and keep your pup's brain active (not necessarily training, but GSD are definitely a thinking breed and if their brain gets bored, they can get into lots of trouble! lol). Having had an APBT (and therefore probably a very smart, very willing to please, but also intelligent, thinking, and occasionally headstrong dog) you will probably have a good foothold on what you need to do. Best of luck!

Oh, and by the way...pictures when you get her, pretty please! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks all for your input. I will post pics as soon as I can and yes, I hope that raising my APBT gave me a little patience:). Thanks again!
 

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Biting was definitely something you have to work with, Gustav was all teeth and attitude for his first 6 months!. I was constantly removing my fingers, arm, nose... and stick a nyla bone in his month. Be patient, re-enforce good behavior, and he will get through that stage. Gustav is such a sweet boy now at 2 yrs old but I would have never believed it at 3 months!!

Exercise and socialize are so important with a GSDas everyone else stated. You are going to love this dog so much, it will almost casue your heart to burst!
 

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just one question, is it mostly the american bloodlines that have the downsloping hindquarters? I have been told that my pup is mostly german and east european bloodlines and i am looking for the square build and wondering if you can tell as a pup what kind of build she will have. do i make any sense?
 

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just one question, is it mostly the american bloodlines that have the downsloping hindquarters? I have been told that my pup is mostly german and east european bloodlines and i am looking for the square build and wondering if you can tell as a pup what kind of build she will have. do i make any sense?

You make sense. Have you seen one or both of her parents? Or any of the dogs in her lines? If you have her pedigree or her parent's registered names (if they are with a breed registry) you can usually dig information up online and see what her ancestry looks like, so you can get an idea from that.

That being said, typically German working lines are "square" dogs unless put into that three-point stack you see in dog shows, then you get some moderate slope, ideally.

American Show line dogs are bred to be more elongated and have a more exaggerated slope to them, typically.

So if she's German/Euro, depending on if she's from working lines or show lines, she will likely be a square dog of moderate bone and little angulation if she isn't stacked. However, since I don't know what her parents look like, I can only really go on the generalization of how the standards are interpreted between different "types". Really the only way to guess how she might turn out is to look at her parents and grandparents on both sides.
 
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