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Discussion Starter #1
We got our little GS puppy today. A friend of ours breeds them. The mom is a good mom but only for a month or so. We brought her home today she is just over 5 weeks old. I would like to know what I should be doing with her while she is this young. We literally got her an hour ago. Her name is Hope. Ive been on here for a few weeks looking around. You guys have some great info on here and seem very helpful. Ive never had a pup this young so I would just like some ideas and tips. When she gets a little bigger I want to start clicker training her. Thanks in advance! We are so excited to have her. We have a little boy who will be five soon. He has always wanted a puppy so he is excited!
 

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Take her back to the "breeder" and let her stay with the littermates til she is at least 7 or 8 weeks old. She doesn't have to be around the mother, but mom will teach pups.
They learn sooo much from each other and it is a better way to start learning bite inhibition and doggy manners. Please take her back and print this out for the "breeder"
Developmental Stages
and this for safe vaccination schedule:
Dr-Dodds-ChangingVaccProtocol
Taken from this great site:
HEMOPET.HTM
 

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The mom doesn't have to be around her pups for them to learn from each other. Not sure that is really true anyway, the "breeder" is probably sick of cleaning up after them and as long as they are eating on their own, decided to move them out.
 

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Exactly! If the dam isn't "good with them" then she should be seperated. But the pups should NOT be sent to their new homes.
 

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The puppy is already home and it sounds like home may be a better place than with the "breeder." So how about everyone give the OP some advice on how to work with the young pup? After all, people do raise singleton pups and if raised correctly they can turn out to be good dogs. It just means a little more work on the new owners' part.

Chama came home at 5 weeks old. Her brothers were given away at 4 weeks old. The biggest problem with Chama was that she wasn't fully weaned. I had Massie and Massie was wonderful with Chama. She took the place of her litter mates and taught her the doggie ropes.

Do you have another dog or have access to a very good natured, well behaved and healthy adult dog who could be your dog's buddy?

I would try to find her a doggy role model and also read the links above about development and socialization so you can be sure to fill in the gaps she's missing from coming home so early.

Good luck with your pup and keep asking questions!
 

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I agree with you Ruth, but if the breeder is a friend, I would hope Rokit will help the breeder by letting them know 5 weeks is way too young to separate from littermates.
If Rokit decides to keep the 5 week old, I hope the links I provided will be passed on to the friend. I hate to see these poor pups set up for failure before they are even given a chance.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the information. I really dont think taking her back is an option. But I will pass the info along... Do you think it would work if we took our new pup over to play and visit with its littermates? Would that help with the socializing or make it worse? Thanks again!
 

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Yes, it would be best if the pups could interact. I would also be very careful where you bring your pup. Don't go to pet stores and when you go to the vet, carry pup, bring your own towel to set her on. Parvo is very easily transmitted and pup won't be safe til at least the 2nd round of vax are done.
Please look at the vax link....overvaccination is risky.
Get your pup wormed by the vet, bring in a fecal sample every visit to be sure all worms are cleared out. Pups normally carry roundworms, hope your friend has done at least one treatment.
Only take your pup where strange dogs don't go, friends/family with safe healthy dogs are best for socializing.
Would love to see pics of Hope!
 

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I would recommend reading this article, it explains the developmental stages of puppies and what they should be doing/learning during each stage:
How To Socialize: Critical Periods of Socialization for a Puppy

Since your puppy was separated from the littermates early, you will need to try to teach the pup what she would normally have learned during those weeks with the litter. Do you have another dog? It can help for a puppy to have another dog to interact with or if you know anyone else with a (healthy!) puppy that may also help to simulate the learning they normally get from mom/littermates at that early stage.


Here are a few other articles that may be helpful, these are about raising singleton puppies or orphans but being removed early from the litter can cause similar issues than orphans/singletons have so the info may be relevant:

http://www.canadawestieclub.ca/breeding/lonepup.html

http://www.dogbehaviorblog.com/2008/08/singleton-puppi.html

http://www.sheltermedicine.com/portal/is_puppies_orphans.shtml
 

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Since the breeder still has the litter, and you can go and visit regularly, I don't understand why you can't leave the puppy there for another two weeks at least? (3 weeks would be MUCH better - but two more weeks would cover a crucial developmental stage).

We are not saying to give him back, just let him have a couple more weeks with the litter before you bring him home.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
thanks to all for your information. At this point i dont think I will let her go back full time with her siblings. We do have friends with dogs that are good tempered for her to socialize with. Also, we will have plenty of play dates with her former littermates. Thanks again. Ill keep everyone posted on her as she grows. And I will put up pix very soon!
 

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*facepalm*

Good luck with that... I can see it now:

"How do I correct this behavior"

"Dog aggression, how do I solve this?"

You're in for a rude awakening if you hold onto your stubbornness.

-E
 
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