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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hey guys, I’m a longtime ( for me) German Shepherd lover and owner. I recently lost my buddy Kramer who my family had for about 11 years. He was a great family dog and protector of the house. ( Thankfully our beloved GSD mix is still kicking around protecting the house)


On to current Situation, I live with my girlfriend in a good sized house with one cat. I have always had a dog in the house, and I am starting to miss the dog in the house feeling.
So I happen to find GSD puppies for sale in my town, talk to the lady and it seems like a great deal.
My only thoughts or confusion are I have a full time job until about the second week of septembe and am really looking for some information about leaving him at home throughout the day and whatnot.

Currently he is 4 weeks old. But she doesn’t want to get rid of them until August 26. I am scheduled to work until the 6th of September. Then should be free for the coming months, with maybe short work days in the meantime but would be close to home. So I am curious about the Week or two where we both would be working from 8-4.

I Most likely can come home during Lunch and potentially bring him to work for the second half of the day ( Work at a ski resort so lots of outside work)
But we have many rooms in our house that are open and free, with a mix of hardwood floors and carpet.
I am wondering what people would suggest for this situation.
I am tempted to ask her to maybe hold on to him until I am done work, but at the same time I feel like I want to get him accustomed to the house and potentially a crate.

A crate is also something I have never done in the past, but I think would potentially be a good idea.

Also we have a cat who has never been expirenced to a dog, how have you guys done that in the past?

Sorry about the lots of rambling, I’m sure some things did not make sense, just super excited and anxious!

Tried to post Pic sof baby and parents but Can’t figure it out on phone.

Thanks guys!
 

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Hello - I think most dog owners work full time. The challenge of course is getting the pup potty trained. They cannot hold it for too long when they are little guys. I got a puppy at 8 weeks old who is now 4 months old. We also had the dilemma of getting the puppy out when we were at work. We have a 6-7 hour window where no one is home. We have a trusted neighbor who comes over to let our puppy out twice a day. He's a very responsible 9th grader and has done fantastic all summer. I have very strict rules for him to follow- like my puppy ALWAYS being leashed outside, collar removed before going back to the crate, etc. Our daughter is also home from college but is working all summer. So if you have a trusted friend/neighbor that could help out. We have a friend that used a service (can't remember the name) whenever he needed help when his work schedule got crazy. He said it was affordable and whoever came always did a great job. I have heard of some people having a x-pen set up for the puppy. Mine would have been right out of one, he's determined enough but settles fine in his crate. It's the safest place for him. If you can bring him to work while he's really little that would be awesome. He/she will sleep a lot anyway. Going home on your lunch is great as well. Sounds like you have options. I have heard some people say not to get a dog if you can't be home. I disagree completely, people work. People figure it out and have puppies that grow into great adult dogs.
 

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I'll never understand the whole "if you work, don't get a dog" thing...My husband and I both work 8 hour days (he at one point was working 12 hour shifts).


As long as you are responsible and have something set up for your puppy and can dedicate time after work to him/her, I say go for it. It would be unfair to keep an 8 week old alone in a crate for 6-7 hours with no potty break (s/he would probably pee/poo in the crate too).


I've used different methods for my dogs - Rover (a website to find a dog walker/sitter), actual doggy day care (really costly here in my area and most places don't take unaltered dogs), and my final one was asking for a favor from 2 friends who don't work (stay at home wives) to let my puppy out or dog sit for some cash. We tended to trade favors for a while (I'll watch your puppy, you watch mine on the weekend I need to go out of town, etc).
Is there a possibility for a neighbor/friend to come over and let the puppy out? Or maybe do the Wags/Rover app/site?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Not going to get into much detail, but unless I can find a friend who has a day off from work, I have trust issues and some stuff in my house that I’d rather not having people in and out that I don’t know. But

When I do leave him for a 4 hour period, is that crate time or can I leave him in a room/ playpen area that is super puppy proof?

Here’s the boy i want with parents.
 

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Ummmm....that middle picture is a Rottweiler. Not a German Shepherd. I find it hard to believe that black and tan puppy thst looks exactly like GSD came from a 50/50 Rott-GSD mix.

And the shepherd has soft ears.

Unless that fee is really, really small, I would mix the deal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yes the mother is a Rotti, at least party Rott.

But the pups look very shepherdy, in my opinion. I’m going this weekend to physically see them and see mom and dad.

I’ve never had anything Rotti, but That doesn’t deter me from getting them, even though family and friends say to maybe stay away because of the Rotti
 

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Please tell me you know you're getting a mixed breed puppy. If you do know and don't care, great. If not... I think more research needs to be done.

EDIT: You posted before I did. I'm glad you don't care if they are mixed. Just be sure to meet both parents so you can see if they have any aggression issues. Puppy looks very cute though!
 

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How old will the puppy be when you bring him home?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Pushing 9 weeks when i would take him home.

What to look for in the parents, i’m sure mom would be a bit more aggressive because her babies are around ? But yes I want to see mom and dad and see how they act.

Also soft ears, is that genetic or just by chance? Not that a i honestly really care if his ears are up or not, I’m not going to be showing him or breeding it, but it’s petfeclty healthy for them to not be standing right?
Not sure how I would feel about taping them.
 

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I like to take the first week off work when I bring home a new puppy. If it was me, and I had a choice of 8 weeks old while working full time (I assume you're not able to take time off in August since you will be off work by 9/6 anyway), or waiting until 9 or 10 weeks old and being around all the time, I would go with the latter option.

Dena and Keefer each came home at 9 weeks old, and Halo at 10 weeks old. The timing was not good for Cava when she was 8 weeks old, but the breeder really liked us and thought we would be a great home for her so she offered to hold onto her until we were ready. Cava didn't get here until she was 4-1/2 months old. I would have loved to get her sooner, but the ages the other three dogs were when we got them was not an issue at all.

If your breeder is willing to hold off for a week or two and you decide to go that route, I would offer something towards food and expenses for that extra time. That's what I did with Cava, I asked the breeder what she thought a reasonable boarding fee would be, and I actually rounded it up a bit since I didn't think it was enough. She was doing some basic training and socialization with Cava along with the two puppies she was keeping from the litter. I also covered Cava's vet expenses during that time since she was due for some vaccinations, and I sent a new collar when she outgrew her puppy collar.
 

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What to look for in the parents, i’m sure mom would be a bit more aggressive because her babies are around?
I would ask to meet her with the puppies not around, in another room perhaps. If she's aggressive towards invited guests, I would be concerned about the temperament of the puppies since that's largely inherited.

Also soft ears, is that genetic or just by chance? Not that a i honestly really care if his ears are up or not, I’m not going to be showing him or breeding it, but it’s petfeclty healthy for them to not be standing right?
Not sure how I would feel about taping them.
It can be genetic, but not necessarily. Since your puppy will be partly Rottweiler and they do not have erect ears, there's a very good chance your puppy's ears won't stand, whether you tape or not.
 

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Mom shouldn’t be aggressive around puppies. I just picked my boy up and mom was totally appropriate with strangers around her pups.

400 isn’t a deal. All you are doing is supporting backyard breeding. You’re taking A major gamble that isn’t worth it. Shell out another thousand and you get a quality dog with a health guarantee and a pedigree.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Great I will try and see how mom is and how friendly she is, on her own and away from the babies.

And the ears don’t bother me, I know some GSD people who really want the ears up but that is perfectly fine with me, give him some character !

Personally I have never done much with A rotti, do you guys have any expirence ? The mom
looks rather small , i know they are usually working dogs and are quite muscular.
Also i’m terrible at science and not sure how it works, but a Rotti and GSD having a baby, doesn’t necessarily mean it would be a 50/50 mix right? Depending on the dominant genes it could be more GSD or Rotti than the other ?

Just curious .

Thanks already guys!! Super helpful
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
And Konathe gsd

I somewhat agree and disagree with that statement. I got all of my dogs previously from rescues and shelters.

This lady had no intentions of having pups it sounded liked, and wants to find good homes for them. I could be wrong but dosent sound like “backyard breading “ at least on a purpose.
I have personally met people in Vermont who have shelled out 1-3000$ on Gsd and had terrible health issues coming from “breeders and bloodline stuff”

It was actually 250$ for the pups.

I’d rather help someone out and not let them end up in a shelter than have maybe a 100% GSD and pay an arm and a leg for.

But I do understand what you are saying 100%.
I’m sure with someone having puppies like this may be higher changes they could have some back genetics
 

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Also i’m terrible at science and not sure how it works, but a Rotti and GSD having a baby, doesn’t necessarily mean it would be a 50/50 mix right? Depending on the dominant genes it could be more GSD or Rotti than the other?
If a purebred Rotti and a purebred GSD have puppies they will be 50/50 mixes. Whether the pups end up looking more like one breed than the other is a tossup, and they may not even look all that much like each other but that doesn't change their genetic makeup.

If you have any siblings, you are all 50/50 mixes of your parent's genes, but unless you have an identical twin, you may or may not resemble each other much and some may favor one parent more than the other. Same thing.
 

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Yes, the pups would be 50/50 GSD and Rott. Are you sure the mother is a purebred Rott? It's possible that she is also a mix too, meaning the pups would be even more likely to come out very different than your typical GSD. The puppy you posted a picture of does look a lot like a German shepherd. He just looks like a "pet bred" puppy is all. That isn't a huge deal.
 

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If you're in Vermont, there are some excellent GSD breeders within a few hours drive. Some in Canada, some in New England. But if you don't care about the dog being purebred and like the health and temperament of the parents, that's fine. But realize the dog may or may not show many shepherd traits and may or may not look like a shepherd, grown. I don't know much about rotties, but they can have many health and behavior problems- so be cautious about Mom's temperament. And Dad's, too for that matter.
 

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Congratulations on the new pup. I'd keep him in a crate when no one can watch him, and have someone come to take him on potty breaks every couple of hours. If you don't have any friends or family nearby who can come, maybe you could have a pet setter pop in to let the pup out. I know you said you don't want strangers to come in, so maybe the breeder could keep him an extra week or two until your schedule is better. I brought my last GSD puppy home at 11 weeks and all was fine. I trained a pup (a toy breed, not a GSD!) to potty on training pads once. I will never EVER do that again. Later, when my schedule was better, and I wanted to train him to go outside, he never really caught on. Granted, that was a breed that is noted to be difficult to housebreak....but STILL it was very frustrating.
 
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