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We just adopted this GSD x Husky puppy. I recently discovered that the brown nose indicates she is either liver-colored or isabella-colored, but how do you tell the difference? I've never seen either in real life, and colors on a screen can be misleading. Thoughts?
 

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It means nothing because you have a mix. You can't assign only GSD genetics to the dog and discount the husky genetics.

IF she were a purebred then the nose color would indicate a possible liver which is a dilute gene and not part of the acceptable standard.

But she's not so just enjoy your brown dog :)
 

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yes, what Jax said!
but also keep in mind that some of these terms are breed specific. Isabella for instance, is used in dobermans... also known as fawn.
a brown nose can indicate a liver, chocolate, red, etc. depending on breed.
in your case if you are certain the dog is 50% gsd and 50% siberian husky (both parents purebred), i would probably assume that the color (aside from the tan markings) is coming from the husky side since it’s more common, and he’d be “red”.
 

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It means nothing because you have a mix. You can't assign only GSD genetics to the dog and discount the husky genetics.

IF she were a purebred then the nose color would indicate a possible liver which is a dilute gene and not part of the acceptable standard.

But she's not so just enjoy your brown dog :)
Why doesn't it mean anything?

Are you saying that there is no such thing as a liver husky?

ETA: Yes, I know about the dilute gene and the acceptable standard. Obviously the standard is irrelevant to a mix. But that doesn't mean that genetics don't apply to a mix.
 

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Ok. I have no idea if the same dilute genes cause the brown color in Husky's. maybe you should ask on a genetics page? There is a facebook page for dog genetics.

Happy Thanksgiving!
 

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yes, what Jax said!
but also keep in mind that some of these terms are breed specific. Isabella for instance, is used in dobermans... also known as fawn. a brown nose can indicate a liver, chocolate, red, etc. depending on breed.
in your case if you are certain the dog is 50% gsd and 50% siberian husky (both parents purebred), i would probably assume that the color (aside from the tan markings) is coming from the husky side since it’s more common, and he’d be “red”.
This site indicates that the term "isabella" can be used to indicate a dilute of "red" in siberian huskies. So it sounds like the gene is the same, but they are expressed differently in different breeds, and owners name them differently in different breeds?
 

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Ok. I have no idea if the same dilute genes cause the brown color in Husky's. maybe you should ask on a genetics page? There is a facebook page for dog genetics.

Happy Thanksgiving!
Sorry if I asked the wrong people. I searched this forum and the internet in general for two days trying to find the answer. The best I could come up with was that isabella or "lilac" is "mouse brown." I suppose a genetic test would tell conclusively, but it's not that important.

I just thought that there might be someone on the forum with an isabella GSD who could say, "No way! That color looks nothing like the real thing!" Or, "That is definitely neither liver nor isabella; you've got a strange cocktail on your hands." Or something else from first hand experience.

Happy Thanksgiving to you, too!
 

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think of it this way...
(at least i think this is where Jax was going)
if you were to mix a labrador with a chesapeake bay retriever (or vizsla for example) and the pups came out with the same liver pigment - that pup couldn’t really be considered a chocolate lab seeing as tho the coloring could have come from either side and there are no “chocolate” chesapeake bay retrievers.
it’s basically a brown dog... genetics (dilute genes) and breed determine what term that brown is called.
 
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I think I"d wait a little bit to decide on the color. I"m leaning towards a liver/tan combo. Although you may have a sable. Sables can run from tan to silver. Take a look at a single hair and if it's more than one color, chances are he a sable, although his toes don't see to have developed markings - yet. If he's a good dog, it does not matter what color he is. They are all huggable. He looks like an absolute sweetie!
 

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to my knowledge there is no isabella gsd. it’s considered liver. aside from the nose and eye pigment, your puppies other colors and markings do not resemble those of a purebred gsd or siberian husky, but those of a mix. tho one might argue he’s just maskless.

note that i’m specifying siberian husky, as husky in itself or alaskan husky is not necessarily a purebred dog and can essentially come in any color/combo.

what color are your dogs parents?
 

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This is my husky mix Misty.I have no idea what her color would be called,lol!She's beige,cream,with black,brown,and gold markings.She got her name because as a puppy she was blonde and appeared to be misted with black paint.A husky owner I once met thought she was a 'Eurohound',a racing type dog mixed with husky and some sort of hound.
 

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to my knowledge there is no isabella gsd. it’s considered liver. aside from the nose and eye pigment, your puppies other colors and markings do not resemble those of a purebred gsd or siberian husky, but those of a mix. tho one might argue he’s just maskless.

note that i’m specifying siberian husky, as husky in itself or alaskan husky is not necessarily a purebred dog and can essentially come in any color/combo.

what color are your dogs parents?
Isabella is a double dilute meaning the dogs have both liver and blue recessive that's showing up. So it's certainly possible in shepherds but would probably come from inbreeding as both recessives are pretty uncommon and it seems like a few key dogs are where the different colors come from so harder to breed them unrelated.


So the chance of the dog being Isabella is pretty much 0%. Since he's not a purebred he'd probably be brown and tan or something along those lines versus being considered liver colored since the liver in shepherds and the red/brown in huskies is a bit different. Don't know if it's the same gene but it certainly has different effects.

https://www.animalgenetics.us/canine/canine-color/BLocus.asp
 

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great example dogma.... and to call that dog a reverse mask fawn patterned sable (all purebred gsd terms) would be a little silly.
 

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think of it this way...
(at least i think this is where Jax was going)
if you were to mix a labrador with a chesapeake bay retriever (or vizsla for example) and the pups came out with the same liver pigment - that pup couldn’t really be considered a chocolate lab seeing as tho the coloring could have come from either side and there are no “chocolate” chesapeake bay retrievers.
it’s basically a brown dog... genetics (dilute genes) and breed determine what term that brown is called.

Exactly. Look at the spotting gene. Shepherds can have white spots but it is residual white. Other breeds have an actual spotting gene that creates their white. Mix a Shepherd with another breed - which causes the white? Is it residual? or did the spotting gene come thru?
 

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mkmk, there's a facebook group called Embark Vet DNA discussion group- you can upload her picture there and ask
them about her coloring. Lots of knowledgeable people there plus others guess the breeds in your dog and sometimes
people will post pictures of their dog who may look a lot like yours and generally they've done the Embark DNA test so
they know for sure what the mixes are in the dog. It's a fun group. Check it out.

You have a very cute puppy but I don't see any GSD traits or any Husky. I'd do a dna test if you really want to know.
 

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great example dogma.... and to call that dog a reverse mask fawn patterned sable (all purebred gsd terms) would be a little silly.
Sounds like a Dr. Seuss dog breed:)I love it!I may change my signature line now...
 

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Thank you! You've all been so helpful! I'm glad I can come to a place full of experts willing to sacrifice their Thanksgiving afternoons! Hope you're having a lovely holiday and I'll continue my search along the genetic lines suggested by some of you!
 

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A lot of breeds carry for dilute, but naming the actual color of a mixed breed dog can be.... interesting, as the same genetic combination that causes Color X in *This Breed* can be the same combination that causes what is called Color Y in "That Breed* and Color Z in *Yet Another Breed*.

I found this handy chart on Siberian Husky colors and markings, if you are interested. https://www.huskycolors.com/rescue.html

If you want to use a Siberian color to describe him, then wolf grey might come the closest. If you want to use GSD terms, then liver sable might be the closest thing.
 
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