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I received this email invitation over the weekend from a lab that I've used recently. It's an open invitation to participate in a study that sounds interesting, and it did close with the invitation to "forward to a friend".

For others who may want to participate ~

DDC Veterinary is excited about research being conducted on the Genetics of Canine Hyper-Sociability. The study is being performed by Dr. Bridgett M. vonHoldt, Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, at Princeton University.

What is Canine Hyper-Sociability?

Genetic findings provide a possible story for how humans domesticated wolves into dogs, which is suggested to have been through “the survival of the friendliest."
The research group recently identified mutations in a handful of genes that influence how friendly a dog or wolf is towards humans.
For more information, visit the Canine Hyper-Sociability website.

Dr. vonHoldt is working to develop a successful genetic survey for these mutations from dogs' DNA samples. Her group needs samples from all types of dogs. If you choose to participate, Dr. vonHoldt will send you a short report describing the number and type of gene variants your dog carries.

Want to join the study? Here's what you need to do:

Stage 1: Basic data collection Three forms: The consent form, demographic information and a short 42-question behavioral assessment of each individual dog. All forms can also be found on the project’s website.
Stage 2: Behavioral video data collection Two short behavioral tests you can conduct and record at home with your dog! Sociability test and Problem Solving test
Stage 3: Genetic sample donation Once all of the forms and video tests have been received by Dr. vonHoldt, she will send qualified participants the non-invasive cheek swab kit that can be collected at home, without the need for a vet visit. (Whole blood samples also accepted.)
Scan completed forms and name the file as "LastName_FirstName.pdf" Email the forms to Dr. vonHoldt at [email protected]. Put "WBS Participation" in the subject of the email, otherwise the email maybe discarded. Or mail the forms to:

Dr. Bridgett M. vonHoldt, Assistant Professor
Princeton University, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
106A Guyot Hall
Princeton, NJ 08544
Email: [email protected], Phone: 609-258-7021
Webpage: https://www.princeton.edu/~vonholdt/dog_wbs.html

Please note: All samples and information must be sent to Dr. vonHoldt at the address above. Go to the project website for details. Information needs to be received by June 30, 2018.

Please direct all questions regarding this study to Dr. vonHoldt and not to DDC.

Thank you for your time!

DDC Veterinary
 

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@Apex1, you could always write the PI and ask directly, but, given the description provided at the link, I suspect that BYBs would be welcome; viz, We work extensively ... to integrate genomics and behavioral data gathered from wolves and domestic dogs of any variety, breed, and ancestry.

BTW, if you're interested in your dogs' behavior, more generally, you could always complete the C-BARQ --- which is part of the above protocol (https://vetapps.vet.upenn.edu/cbarq/). You'll get immediate results (unlike the iffy timeline for the hypersociability study) and you also can get assistance from the C-BARQ researchers in interpreting the results.

Aly
 

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Thst is super interesting. There are 2 black phase wolves at a local wolf sanctuary that have a higher level of suspicion than their white litter mates. An employee is trying to get Purdue to look for a genetic link as they are seeing a pattern with all the black phase wolves.
 

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Thst is super interesting. There are 2 black phase wolves at a local wolf sanctuary that have a higher level of suspicion than their white litter mates. An employee is trying to get Purdue to look for a genetic link as they are seeing a pattern with all the black phase wolves.
Interesting! I wonder if this Dr. at Princeton would respond if they reached out.

Apex, I don't think the tester is coming at this from an ethics/performance dog angle. Just data.

This one caught my eye because it actually involves a genetic component (the cheek swab) and video submissions, instead of relying wholly on observations made by a dog's owner.

We can think we're being objective or unbiased when we answer questionnaires, but we probably aren't....
 

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Questionnaires are never that accurate. Training and experiencex will influence behavior and skew results.
 

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Hmmm..my dog Alvin was a hyper social train wreck (rescue 3 months). It is why he initially washed out of SD training. He LOVED OB. Was initially (up until the end) great off lead. Way too outgoing though to the point the running joke was he identifies with an Irish Setter. Got him to the point where he would not break to go say hello to a complete stranger, but he would be so focused on them and trembling with the desire to go flop at their feet belly up. It is a long story and posted under Aggression section..but over the last year of his life he unraveled, turned aggressive, his hyper socialism turned into aggressive demands.. would not let people leave the house as such he became a kenneled dog when people were in the house. Had I seen this study back then, I would have so been on board with participating. More than a few thousand on vets, behaviorists, and trainers. For shrugged shoulders and "genetically unraveling". PB dog, gorgeous, mentally not sound.
 

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