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Good afternoon,



We are the proud owners of our very first German shepheard! We have named him Gus (My wife chose Augustus) but that was far too long. We got him from Swindon and he is not KC registered but we have met the parents and the owner was fairly helpful.



We took him to get his boosters Friday however it turns out he was not micro chipped even though we were told he was : ( so we have opted to start again with all vaccines etc, slightly sad as it means he still cannot go out.



He is overall a very good dog, we have mostly cracked his toilet habbits, it is just the wee we are having a hard time with but I am sure given some more time he will get there!



My only question so far is... When will his puppy teeth go? We are having some problems with him and the children, obviously he likes to explore with his mouth like all dogs do but we keep getting questions from the nursery about scratches and bites we have tried to tell the kids approach him with a toy in your hand etc so he bites that but well kids are kids and don't listen



Any tips and advice would be awesome, we are enrolling him into puppy school once hes up to date with all jabs!
 

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They stop teething as late as 8 to 9 months. in the meantime you can let your dog chew up rinsed plastic juice bottles, the big ones. I let mine tear up cardboard boxes. We used that desire to mouth as a reward for good behavior with some little tug or war games. Even still, we did go through a number of bandaids and antibiotic cream. It takes awhile to get aim and timing down, both us and the dogs.

As far as the microchip, my gal-dog was chipped but it didn't show up when I had the vet check it. So we rechipped her at her next exam and I registered the working chip.
 

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Welcome,

I would Google, German Shepherd Landshark, puppy phase. It will help you out a lot to know what you are in for. The teething period for a GSD could seem like an eternity. You'll probably loose your mind and just when you think you have had enough, the teething phase should be over :) Invest in a lot of toys, distractions. Always have one with you or close by. When he starts to act up, re-direct to the toy and prays him when he listens.
 

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I don’t allow my children to approach our pup at all. They have been taught to keep a toy in reaching distance, and should the puppy approach them, offer the toy and ignore. It’s not because I don’t want my kids to enjoy our pup, it’s because we don’t want our kids encouraging negative behaviors in our pup. For instance, when she first came home, they were a little frightened when the pup would start pulling on their clothes. Their initial reactions was to start shrieking loudly, and try to run away. Which the pup takes as yay, it’s play time, and chased after them. Which only made them more scared. So we taught the kids to give the dog their back and ignore completely if they are standing, and to offer the toy if they are sitting. Took about a week, but the pup no longer goes after the kids, and the kids are no longer scared of the pup. My kids are used to older rescue dogs, and they have that down pat, but this is the first puppy we’ve had that is still in the teething phase. I believe it’s just as important to train the kids as it is to train the puppy. Many family pets bite out of “nowhere.” When really, the children were allowed alone and unsupervised with the dog, and the children would often be laying on them, climbing all over them, pulling ears and tails, hitting them. So the dog eventually gets frustrated that the humans are doing nothing to stop this behavior, and take it in their own hands to stop that child, and that’s via a bite. I’ve seen pictures and videos on Facebook of parents not only allowing, but encouraging their kids to rise their dog like it’s a pony! You can see the signs of distress in the dog, and it’s a horrible sight to see.

Anyway, we have two boxes chalk full of toys, and have one put away, and one available to the pup. We transfer around the toys every few days so the pup doesn’t get bored of the same toys. Even if it’s one they played with two weeks ago, rotating it along with the other toys makes it more interesting to the pup than if she had had access to it all the time.

Crate when the pup can’t be supervised, do short 10-15 training sessions several times a day, and use other means to get out all that puppy energy until he has his jabs up to date. Hide and seek with owner, scent work (puncture holes in a plastic bottle, put something super smelly in there, I use sardines, and hide them around the house and have your puppy “find them.” I usually reward each dog that finds one with a sardine of their own to eat. They LOVE scent work. And tired pups are less likely to be bitey pups.

Hope some of this helps!
 
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