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Discussion Starter #1
Hi
I’m new to this site and I am also a new owner to a GSD pup. She is 15 weeks now. Anytime I let her roam around our home she is constantly stuffing around nonstop. When we go for walks she does the same. Is this a normal thing? Any advice
 

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Welcome to the forum! I'll second huntergreen: Abbbbsolutely normal. Especially a GSD. When my dog enters a new place or a new room, he'd immediately sniff out every inch of the place to inspect, inspect, inspect. That's just how they're built.
 

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When mine was a young pup he spent all of his time exploring and sniffing. I admired his independent and curious nature. My senior dog would take it upon herself to gently guide him around the property and show him the “cool” stuff. To a dog this seems to be under the bay window where the ducks sometimes hang out (and consequently poop, very interesting to a dog), look for critters underneath wood at the fire pit, check out the creek, the barn, the frog pond, etc. it was very endearing to watch my old dog take him under her wing. Anyway, completely normal! I did notice that he seemed more curious than other puppies.
 

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Hi
I’m new to this site and I am also a new owner to a GSD pup. She is 15 weeks now. Anytime I let her roam around our home she is constantly stuffing around nonstop. When we go for walks she does the same. Is this a normal thing? Any advice
My advice, and you'll soon come to understand, be happy for every minute your puppy is distracted by sniffing around! At least then she's not biting you LOL!
 

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As others have said, sniffing is how dogs explore the world.

I have a 4-month-old rather nervous pup. Whenever we go somewhere he starts with his tail down and nearly straight indicating he is anxious. After sniffing for a little while, and getting his bearings, his tail comes up and the end curls up about 90 degrees. I always watch his tail, if it starts to uncurl, it is time for a bit of sniff :)

When we go for walks, he is usually on a 20-foot lead so he can sniff whatever he wants. Currently, his only leash rule is no pulling... or I silently turn and walk the opposite direction.

Some people like retractable leads. I like a normal 20-foot lead because I have to manually take in and let out the lead so he doesn't trip over it. That forces me to pay close attention to what he is doing and where he is likely to go. If I expect him to engage with me, I figure I should stay as engaged as possible with him.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thank you for the welcoming! Yes, she is my first GSD pup. Should I let her sniff around for the entire walk? If I let her, she most definitely will lol
557283
 

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Discussion Starter #11
What’s a good brand of food for her? At the moment I am using Blue Buffalo Wilderness. Is this a good brand? One more question. What are your thoughts on spaying?
 

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I have a retractable leash actually and prefer a normal leash because of the horror story that I’ve heard about the owner letting it go after a dog pulled hard and the handle knocked the dog unconscious.
 

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I’ve been using Fromm for many years, it has never been recalled and has many formulas. Also I use instinct raw food and Stella and Chewy dry freeze.
Expensive stuff.. or I feed them home cooked and raw. Lots of options.
 

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Welcome to the board! Totally normal for a puppy, especially a breed known for having a good sniffer. Even sighthounds, who are notorious for having 'poor' sniffers (hence the name) do this. It's how dogs explore and understand the world. As that adorable pup gets older (what's her name, btw?) you can gradually introduce leash walking manners. Until then, keep in mind that leash walking a puppy, especially babies, isn't always for the faint of heart. ;).

DISCLAIMER: I HATE retractable leads!!!! :mad: Why? First, the dog/puppy typically isn't under even minimal control, so the owner is actually teaching the pup/dog bad manners. Don't know about you, but I'd rather NOT train something I'll have to undo later; life is too short. Second, absent even minimal control, the puppy (later adult) is a virtual threat to other dogs and humans that you may encounter. I've lost count of the number of times I've seen non dog walkers tripped or wrapped up in a retractable lead attached to somebody else's dog. Third, repeated use of retractable leads teaches the dog/puppy to pull. Unless you foresee sledding in your future, that's something I'd avoid. Fourth, I find retractables to be shoddily constructed, making them subject to breaking without warning. I personally know a lovely MinPin who was killed when that happened. MinPin lunged after a squirrel, leash broke, MinPin dashed into the street and was promptly crushed by an oncoming SUV. Traumatic for everyone.

My two cents: Throw that POS away and get a lightweight lead and collar appropriate for a puppy. You can always move up to a slip/choke/prong, as you see fit, later when serious training begins and/or when the puppy outgrows the baby equipment. For now, keep yourself and that adorable puppy safe!
 

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Welcome to the board! Totally normal for a puppy, especially a breed known for having a good sniffer. Even sighthounds, who are notorious for having 'poor' sniffers (hence the name) do this. It's how dogs explore and understand the world. As that adorable pup gets older (what's her name, btw?) you can gradually introduce leash walking manners. Until then, keep in mind that leash walking a puppy, especially babies, isn't always for the faint of heart. ;).

DISCLAIMER: I HATE retractable leads!!!! :mad: Why? First, the dog/puppy typically isn't under even minimal control, so the owner is actually teaching the pup/dog bad manners. Don't know about you, but I'd rather NOT train something I'll have to undo later; life is too short. Second, absent even minimal control, the puppy (later adult) is a virtual threat to other dogs and humans that you may encounter. I've lost count of the number of times I've seen non dog walkers tripped or wrapped up in a retractable lead attached to somebody else's dog. Third, repeated use of retractable leads teaches the dog/puppy to pull. Unless you foresee sledding in your future, that's something I'd avoid. Fourth, I find retractables to be shoddily constructed, making them subject to breaking without warning. I personally know a lovely MinPin who was killed when that happened. MinPin lunged after a squirrel, leash broke, MinPin dashed into the street and was promptly crushed by an oncoming SUV. Traumatic for everyone.

My two cents: Throw that POS away and get a lightweight lead and collar appropriate for a puppy. You can always move up to a slip/choke/prong, as you see fit, later when serious training begins and/or when the puppy outgrows the baby equipment. For now, keep yourself and that adorable puppy safe!
Thank you for the advice 😊 I appreciate very much. Her name is Levi.
 
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