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my new gsd puppy ( 5 months old) omg, what a hand full. First question im hoping someone will answer, are these breeds normally " out of control" in a good way?
 

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I have my first GSD puppy (now 9 1/2 mos.) but she is not my first puppy. I will say that she is definitely a lot more work than other puppies I've had. Bigger, stronger, mouthier (bitey and loud), smarter, and full of energy (which does not always manifest in positive behaviors.) I say that she's "extra." Been doing a lot more training with her than my past pups- we're both happier when actively involved with a trainer. I have a feeling the rewards will also greater! :)
 

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hey. I guess my biggest issue at hand is, "luke" he`s 5 months old. I do have another older dog 10 yrs old ( collie/golden retriever mix) and luke seems to be in his own world lol when he`s constantly biting on my old dog. I can literally yell and its like he totally shuts me out. He`ll continue until I have to crate him up for a "time out". Is this normal for a gsd? at his age or would you recommend directing him to a trainer?
 

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my new gsd puppy ( 5 months old) omg, what a hand full. First question im hoping someone will answer, are these breeds normally " out of control" in a good way?
Any working breed as a puppy are going to be crazy sometimes destructive and what not, which shouldn't be encouraged.You should start training now and exercise is key to a well behaved pup! Other than that not sure what you're asking... A smart protective dog shouldn't be encouraged to go off the rails but more encouraged to exercise with you and play!
 

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hey. I guess my biggest issue at hand is, "luke" he`s 5 months old. I do have another older dog 10 yrs old ( collie/golden retriever mix) and luke seems to be in his own world lol when he`s constantly biting on my old dog. I can literally yell and its like he totally shuts me out. He`ll continue until I have to crate him up for a "time out". Is this normal for a gsd? at his age or would you recommend directing him to a trainer?
Normal at that age. Does your other dog discipline the puppy at all? As in: growl, snarl, lift their lip, push away with a paw.

If yes, allow the older dog to reprimand the puppy in dog-language. Only interfere if: 1) the puppy is insistent and your older dog is repeatedly trying to tell the puppy to go away, 2) the puppy will not allow the older dog to sleep or escape a room, or 3) your older dog over-corrects by harassing the puppy when the puppy is clearly minding its own business.

If no, then you'll have to play referee and carefully read your older dog's body language. Look for attempts to escape, continued appeasement gestures (a submissive attempt to get the puppy to stop), and clinging to you as a barrier.

Also, yelling doesn't really do anything. I'm not even going to tell you it scares the puppy, because a lot of time, it won't really frighten a GSD puppy. It just doesn't mean anything to the puppy, and that's why it doesn't work. You'll have to teach the word "No" or use some other unpleasant sound ("eh-eh!" seems to naturally work) as a correction. Always follow up your "No" with whatever the "Yes" behavior is supposed to be. Ex: "No!" stop bothering the other dog he's trying to sleep; "Yes!" chase this ball I just threw. "No!" stop eating my shoes; "Yes!" chew on this toy.

There are also times when a puppy just gets tired and has not learned how to calm itself down. This is when you start seeing frenzied biting, running around, and a complete refusal to stop doing either. That's when you put them in their crate with a chew toy (drop a cloth over it if you must) to make them quiet down and go to sleep or quietly chew. They don't know how to settle, and we have to teach them to settle.
 

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Find a younger more ambitious playmate for your youngin'.
I spent the other morning at the dog park w/ my 2-3 yr. old female GSD. She spent most of her time training/playing/disciplining a 5 mo. old female GSD who just happened to be there. That puppy would not leave her alone and since she had a litter of puppies right before I got her at the shelter, she knew how to correct that 5 mo. old.
My dog went right into semi-play but a lot of corrections (mostly gently) and that 5 mo. old wouldn't give up. Play, play, play and run, run, run. Bite and run, bite and roll over. It was so cute, but my dog was worn out near the end of our visit.
Ask around or go to a dog park, where there's well taken care of dogs. Not a slum park- those may be mean dogs.
But always supervise the play, just to be safe.
 

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Yes it’s normal but you can curb a lot of that by offering your puppy exercise, thought games and tasks, and obedience training. You have a lot of good suggestions here. German Shepherds do best when they are both physically and mentally challenged. When your puppy is too much for the older dog, separate them. I used a crate, but also gates so I can keep them together but separate. I gate off one room, and I also have a large children’s play yard that I can open up to divide a room. I have one a friend gave me when she was done with it. It’s called Toddleroo by North States Superyard Classic 6 panel. I like plastic better than metal as it is more versatile. I also have a metal x pen she lent me and never wanted back but it’s very heavy.
 

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my new gsd puppy ( 5 months old) omg, what a hand full. First question im hoping someone will answer, are these breeds normally " out of control" in a good way?
Yes. I'm sure someones already said this, but you can give them the exercise and challenge their minds to help them be less crazy.
 

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Normal at that age. Does your other dog discipline the puppy at all? As in: growl, snarl, lift their lip, push away with a paw.

If yes, allow the older dog to reprimand the puppy in dog-language. Only interfere if: 1) the puppy is insistent and your older dog is repeatedly trying to tell the puppy to go away, 2) the puppy will not allow the older dog to sleep or escape a room, or 3) your older dog over-corrects by harassing the puppy when the puppy is clearly minding its own business.

If no, then you'll have to play referee and carefully read your older dog's body language. Look for attempts to escape, continued appeasement gestures (a submissive attempt to get the puppy to stop), and clinging to you as a barrier.

Also, yelling doesn't really do anything. I'm not even going to tell you it scares the puppy, because a lot of time, it won't really frighten a GSD puppy. It just doesn't mean anything to the puppy, and that's why it doesn't work. You'll have to teach the word "No" or use some other unpleasant sound ("eh-eh!" seems to naturally work) as a correction. Always follow up your "No" with whatever the "Yes" behavior is supposed to be. Ex: "No!" stop bothering the other dog he's trying to sleep; "Yes!" chase this ball I just threw. "No!" stop eating my shoes; "Yes!" chew on this toy.

There are also times when a puppy just gets tired and has not learned how to calm itself down. This is when you start seeing frenzied biting, running around, and a complete refusal to stop doing either. That's when you put them in their crate with a chew toy (drop a cloth over it if you must) to make them quiet down and go to sleep or quietly chew. They don't know how to settle, and we have to teach them to settle.
Thanks a whole bunch, I greatly appreciate the feed back, I really do!! I have also since I posted my initial question have signed him up for training with a very reputable trainer. Thanks again(y)
 

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P.S. Also, I thank each and every one of you who gave me recommendations and suggestions. Ya`ll are very helpful. Thanks again!!
 
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