German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello ladies and gents. Thought I'd post a quick hello as I've been browsing around extensively the last couple weeks.

Condensed intro would be, I'm Jo, this is my first GSD, I'm female, I'm from Ontario, Canada and a certified "must love dogs" kind of dog lover. No kids, just dogs- I like it that way. ;)

I grew up with rottweilers and have had nothing but rotties for the last 15 years, having shared my adult life with 4 of them. My pack of two went down to one two years ago when my female past at 13 (old for a rott), then this past spring my boy past rather suddenly at 10. Both were rescues.

Last fall I started looking into getting another dog (one dog just isn't enough hair, apparently) and started leaning towards going with a GSD. Didn't happen, for no real reason.

After having an empty house, I picked up a 6mth old female GSD. Absolute doll. She's been hilarious and quite the addition to my home. There's been some noticeable differences between raising a GSD v. raising a rottweiler but I'm loving it so far!

Looking forward to reading more and more info around the forums.

:)

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
She's a stunner! And photogenic, I love it!

Well, I've only had her a month, and of course it could just be her personality, but this is what I've noticed so far as stark differences to the rottweilers I've owned or fostered.

She sure loves to hear herself bark, where most rottweilers I've encountered have been quiet in general. My rotties, even newly fostered, tend to be the wait and see type. You could tell they were paying attention, bu quiet until needed to bark or alert. Usually a talking type of noise instead. My girl GSD tends to be a, "ooooh, what's out there?! I'm going to bark, bark, bark!" type. Different, ha. A different trait we are currently working on. I enjoy knowing a bark needs my attention, not just that a squirrel is running along the fence.
She seems to enjoy to dig (my poor yard, lol), another new thing.
She is not nearly as stubborn as any rottweiler I've had. I'm sure that could change, ha.
But I'll enjoy that difference!
She also seems to enjoy a patrol like pace. Always checking all points of yard when she goes out, a new thing for sure.

Again, she's just a pup so we will see how many more differences I notice.

Fairly similar with drive, being alert, temperament (I think her personality is more timid then other GSD's), and overall extremely loyal.

A huge difference I wasn't expecting is how different people respond to a GSD vs. a rottweiler. It's almost shocking.

I love and adore the rottweiler breed, and I'm positive I'm falling just as in love with the GSD breed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
Very interesting observations on the differences. GSDs are pretty vocal and are not ashamed to whine or voice their opinions. : )

What did you find shocking about the difference in the way people reacted?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
What did you find shocking about the difference in the way people reacted?
I find most people tend to want to meet my new girl, eager to approach her, have their dogs meet her. Where as with a rottweiler, I find people would cross the street with their dogs, unless they had met me prior multiple times.

Could just be my area, and the negative press and **** laws, but it was hard to get people to just relax around my 120lbs boy. I should add, he was extremely well trained and always a good, polite leashed neighbour while out and about.

When my pack was up to three rottweilers (one was a long time foster), people would cross the street and jog away. Even the obvious non-joggers. I found it kind of comical, yet disappointing, considering how well mannered they were. Stereotypes suck, what can I say?
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top