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I have an all black male GSD. He is nine weeks old. I want him to fully mature and get to his full potential before i neuter him. Any suggestions on when he would be ready?

Thank you much?
 

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I wouldn't neuter him at all unless is was absolutely necessary. My own dog is 16 months, intact, easy going and doesn't mark on the property.
 

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I would suggest neutering between 12 to 24 months if you wand him to have most of his growth before he's neutered. Also, he's your dog. You can neuter him any time you and your vet think it appropriate. Just because someone else says they would never neuter a dog unless for health reason, it doesn't make neutering him "wrong".
 

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Discuss it with your vet and breeder, those are your best resources for making a decision that's best for you
 

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I just had my boy neutered at 3 years old a few weeks ago because his prostate kept enlarging and was giving him grief. My vet, who I really appreciate never rushed to neuter but strongly recommended it after a year of this issue off and on. I also got my breeders thoughts.

Had he not had the prostate issue I would have not neutered. I personally never experienced the things you are warned about by keeping an intact dog, humping, marking in the house, being unruly around females, roaming. More importantly I was confident in my ability to keep him contained so he could not reproduce.

I do not think neutering is bad at all. It's really a personal choice and the overall health of the dog should be reviewed.

I will say the surgery is a pretty big deal. Some play it off like in and out, no biggie. My boy healed nicely and his incision site was clean and small but still, it's invasive IMO.

I am however thankful he got the full benefit of being intact while he was maturing/growing.

I would wait at least until 12 months...even up to 1.5 years if you can and it makes sense for you. Good luck!
 

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I've always waited until they're 18 to 24 months old before I started thinking about them being neutered. There's also the option of a vasectomy.
 

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We've always followed the philosophy that you shouldn't neuter/spay until growth plates are completely closed. You would need to have x-rays to verify this if the dog is young.

Check out this article about neutering/spaying:https://www.avma.org/News/JAVMANews/Pages/130401s.aspx

Article Snippet: https://www.avma.org/News/JAVMANews/Pages/130401s.aspx"Neutering and the age at which a dog is neutered may affect the animal’s risk for developing certain cancers and joint diseases, according to a study published Feb. 13 in the online scientific journal PLOS ONE.

An examination of health records of 759 Golden Retrievers by researchers with the University of California-Davis discovered significantly higher incidents of hip dysplasia, cranial cruciate ligament tears, lymphosarcomas, hemangiosarcomas, and mast cell tumors among neutered dogs, compared with sexually intact dogs.

“The study results indicate that dog owners and service dog trainers should carefully consider when to have their male or female dogs neutered,” said the lead investigator, Dr. Benjamin Hart, a distinguished professor emeritus in the UC-Davis School of Veterinary Medicine.

“It is important to remember, however, that because different dog breeds have different vulnerabilities to various diseases, the effects of early and late neutering also may vary from breed to breed,” he said.
While results of the study are revealing, Dr. Hart said the relationship between neutering and disease risk is a complex issue. For example, the increased incidence of joint diseases among early-neutered dogs is likely a combination of the effect of neutering on the young dog’s growth plates and the increase in body weight that is commonly seen in neutered dogs."
Hope this helps!:)
 

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I say wait until it becomes a problem. If him being unfixed becomes a problem then fix him (meaning neuter). You should wait until he starts humping things, marking his territory etc. and IF he does that (he may not) than fix him. If he never gets to that point, than there isn't much of a need. Most people think to always neuter because if he gets out he could find a female dog or animal and mate, but there is a small chance that can happen. Ultimately, keep a close eye on him, and then decide if he needs it or not.
 

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Neutering is a personal decision. The biggest question you must ask yourself is - can you contain an intact dog and ensure he will not be able to reproduce if you opt against neutering him or wait to get him neutered?

I, personally, will not neuter my boy unless it is medically necessary. I would love if I could find a vet that would perform a vasectomy, but I've yet to locate one. But I also know that vasectomized or not, I can keep him from breeding. I would want the vasectomy as an extra piece of mind.

There is a lot of information out there on the benefits and drawbacks of neutering. You have to really dig for the drawbacks, as there's so much propaganda for pro spay/neuter, but you can find it. Do a search on the forum and even surf the web and read up to make the best decision for yourself and your dog.
 

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i've never neutered my dogs and i've never had a problem with
them medically, temperament wise or marking.
 

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The more dogs I see at my clinic the more I think keeping males intact as long as possible is a great idea as long as the owner can keep them from reproducing unless intended to!. As annoyed as I am with my intact male 's constant pee licking I think he will stay intact for as long as I can deal with it. Females are a different story, I have seen too many with pyometras and mammary tumors to do that although I did wait until about 18 mths on my female GSD.
 

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The more dogs I see at my clinic the more I think keeping males intact as long as possible is a great idea as long as the owner can keep them from reproducing unless intended to!. .

As this statement came from a vet, I have to ask for specifics!

WHAT exactly are you seeing in neutered males that you are not liking?
 

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As this statement came from a vet, I have to ask for specifics!

WHAT exactly are you seeing in neutered males that you are not liking?
The intact dogs I see, males anyway, are more healthier with less care it seems in general. They generally stay thin and make it into old age more gracefully with less intervention for arthritis because they have been thin their whole lives. Just truly seem to be healthier overall. Less metabolic diseases. I just saw a 14 yr old Chessie who's 75-80 lbs and one of the healthiest dogs of that size and age I've ever seen. Just now having some issues with arthritis, he otherwise looked great. I do see some intact male dogs who for sure are not healthy but its more straight genetic type stuff or lack of care.....missing half their hair due to fleas, heart murmurs from a young age, stuff like that. See very little testicular cancer although I have seen a number with prostate disease, typically benign enlargement and infections. There are always exceptions and you can't improve on general genetics by keeping intact but the more I see the more I think I'm just going to leave my own male intact for a good while.
I wish females didn't suffer from mammary tumors and pyometras so easily, after I spayed my female Yorkie she has packed on the weight and its been very very difficult to keep her from becoming obese. My grandma has her now and uses pscription diet food and walks her a good bit, only uses a few Cheerios a day for treats, but she's still struggling. Even when I had her I really cut back her food, switched to low calorie and canned, barely gave any treats, and walked her 1-2hours a day and she was STILL fat. This started right after I spayed her still pretty young so I don't think there's a thyroid problem and no other symptoms. If she was a male it would have been much better to keep her intact.
 

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Humping and marking are more behavioral
Agreed. My Rottweilers, who were both neutered at 1 year, both marked and humped. Luckily never in the house. ;)

Our vet was actually the one who said to keep our GSD intact or if he was going to be around unspayed females, then give him a vasectomy.

If we were going to neuter him, I would wait until he was fully grown.


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I lost my previous dog because he wasn't spayed. He ran off, and I never saw him again. I had Sarge fixed at 9 months, because I could never go through that again.
 
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