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I am wanting to get Bandit neutered here right off but he is only 9 months old. I have heard several things to neutering a dog young....

*He wont get as big as he would have by getting him neutered young

*He will not be as protective

*He will gain lots of weight

*He wont mature properly

Our vet recommended neutering at least 12 months old. Yet I don't want Bandit to become more in terms of wanting to mate. I like him being the loving family pet he is. I also don't want him to start to wonder or lift his leg marking things. I am confused on what to do. I don't want to hurt him or effect his development or personality. Any suggestions on rather to neuter at his age or not would be great! :smirk:
 

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*He wont get as big as he would have by getting him neutered young
True and False. Generally dogs neutered young become a little taller but less "masculine" looking, so less size through the chest and shoulders, maybe a little narrower in the head

*He will not be as protective
False. Definitely false

*He will gain lots of weight
False, unless you over-feed and under-exercise

*He wont mature properly
See above. Mentally and emotionally he'll mature just fine, but he may not look quite as "male."

Personally, I neutered Rocky at nine months and wish I would have waited until he was a year and a half or so.
 

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i've never neutered a dog and my dogs have never
marked in the house or become unmangeable (sp).
if i were to neuter it would be after the dog is 2 yrs. old or so.
 

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If you want to neuter your dog, there is no reason not to. There are millions of dogs neutered much younger than yours every year without any problems. Some people prefer to wait until their dogs are older, and if they are 100% confident they can prevent an unplanned pregnancy, there is no reason not to either.
 

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I personally prefer to neuter a male when he's around 18-24 months. Also a vasectomy might be another option to neutering.
 

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Hunter got neutered at 6 months or so I can't remember he had to cause we also got his sister Sierra. Hunter is now 15 months old and 68 pounds he still has a lot of fur and skin to grown into, his head is big and so is the rest of his body to me he looks like a cheetah his head is bigger thro but he has a big chest, small waist and long legs and big feet. Your dog will be fine Hunter is protective he has always been and he does look like a male but some people who see him think he is a female I don't know why.
 

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Hunter got neutered at 6 months or so I can't remember he had to cause we also got his sister Sierra. Hunter is now 15 months old and 68 pounds he still has a lot of fur and skin to grown into, his head is big and so is the rest of his body to me he looks like a cheetah his head is bigger thro but he has a big chest, small waist and long legs and big feet. Your dog will be fine Hunter is protective he has always been and he does look like a male but some people who see him think he is a female I don't know why.
Because as you describe his body style, it sounds like he's on the lean side rather than the super muscular side which tends to be more feminine :cool: There's nothing wrong with that at all.
 

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Neutering too young does impair growth to some degree because the growth plates are not fused and the dogs long bones can be affected. Neutering too young also will make a dog obese if your not diligent about exercise and good diet. My 8 year old male lab is not neutered and has never marked, been aggressive, or over/under protective. He's just a normal dog who happens to be intact. I actually wouldn't ever neuter a male unless there were behavioral problems noticed very early on and even then once a behavior is learned neutering solves nothing. I do fix females though at 12-18 months to avoid unwanted pregnancy, but each person's view is different. If you are noticing unwanted behaviors now go ahead- if there is no problem though why rush it?
 

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Definitely best to hold off. Early neutering does affect them physically and mentally. Intact males are not the monsters they are sometimes made out to be. I have lived with intact males since I was a little kid and we never had issues with them marking in the house or trying to escape or anything like that. neutered or not, dogs shouldn't be given an opportunity to roam.

Both of these articles are worth reading, one on the effects of early spaying/neutering and the other on the long term health risks/benefits of spaying and neutering:

Early Spaying/Neutering:
Canine Sports Productions: Early Spay-Neuter Considerations for the Canine Athlete

Long Term Health Risks/Benefits of Spaying/Neutering:
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Great great articles. I have heard of these things from my awesome honest vet, but never been able to find studies that specifically talk about these disorders. I vote keep the boy intact- he'll have fewer health problems, awesome muscle tone, and honeslty not become some rabid beast:)
 

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Great great articles. I have heard of these things from my awesome honest vet, but never been able to find studies that specifically talk about these disorders. I vote keep the boy intact- he'll have fewer health problems, awesome muscle tone, and honeslty not become some rabid beast:)
What do you mean rabid beast? I have had 2 neutered males(1 now and the other previously) neither are rabid beasts.And neutering can both ways. The dog can be neutered and have great muscle tone, and fewer health problems. That all depends on how well the owner takes care of the dog too.
 

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I meant people believe if you don't neuter your dog they become crazed animals who will try and escape to find a mate and become aggressive- not that neutered dogs are rabid beasts hence the word not in my sentence or that unaltered dogs become this way. While I agree a neutered dog can be kept within normal weight range if exercised properly when neutered too young they do not and will not exhibit the same kind of muscle tone other dogs of similar age and exercise levels display- they usually tend to look more feminine in structure though not all. I also believe if you read that article it will show you especially for males neutering tends to produce more health problems down the road and not less. Sure neutered dogs can live to be 15 and an unaltered dog can die at 10, but statistically unaltered males are healthier. Care while important can not prevent many health problems so when thinking about neutering it is important it is pointed out there is evidence to support not doing so, or holding off until later in life:)
 

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i believe the only major problems for intact males are prostate or testicular cancer... there may be a few more but i believe there are more problems neutering then not, especially purebred, unless a genetic defect is found... you never know if your dog could be the next super dog... but then again i suppose you could freeze the semen (i dunno if people do this with dogs o_O ) but my pup is fully papered and i plan on keeping him in tact, since his background is pretty much flawless someone might be interested, if not, such is life. Im not going to push the subject on someone... the only problem i would face would be taking him to a dog park and him mounting an unsuspecting bitch... "oops im sorry, my dog just mounted your pup"... not gonna fly with me
 

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I meant people believe if you don't neuter your dog they become crazed animals who will try and escape to find a mate and become aggressive- not that neutered dogs are rabid beasts hence the word not in my sentence or that unaltered dogs become this way. While I agree a neutered dog can be kept within normal weight range if exercised properly when neutered too young they do not and will not exhibit the same kind of muscle tone other dogs of similar age and exercise levels display- they usually tend to look more feminine in structure though not all. I also believe if you read that article it will show you especially for males neutering tends to produce more health problems down the road and not less. Sure neutered dogs can live to be 15 and an unaltered dog can die at 10, but statistically unaltered males are healthier. Care while important can not prevent many health problems so when thinking about neutering it is important it is pointed out there is evidence to support not doing so, or holding off until later in life:)
I wouldn't wait to neuter so late in life either, that can acutally also cause health issues. And thats just 2 sites, because I have read and seen other sites and heard form other people that have different statistics and those statistics depend on other factors such as breeds of dogs, location etc.

It really depends on the owner when it comes to a dogs health and behavior. There are not fewer health problems, just a lesser chance of getting them, and thats the same for both. For health and behaviors does depend on the owner.

For GSDs its best to wait 1 1/2 - 2 years.
 

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i believe the only major problems for intact males are prostate or testicular cancer... there may be a few more but i believe there are more problems neutering then not, especially purebred, unless a genetic defect is found... you never know if your dog could be the next super dog... but then again i suppose you could freeze the semen (i dunno if people do this with dogs o_O ) but my pup is fully papered and i plan on keeping him in tact, since his background is pretty much flawless someone might be interested, if not, such is life. Im not going to push the subject on someone... the only problem i would face would be taking him to a dog park and him mounting an unsuspecting bitch... "oops im sorry, my dog just mounted your pup"... not gonna fly with me
Many breeders do this, especially if the dog dies suddenly and was a great breeding prospect. Also there are many purebred dogs in shelters and rescues, and they are usually neutered right away.

Also, I would only breed if the breeder has given me permission to or wants to use my dog in his/her breeding program. Also most breeders don't let their puppy buyers breed their pups willy nilly just because someone is interested, most breeders will not like that. And just because your dog is papered and his background is flawless doesn't mean he would be a great stud. Thats where titles come in and many other factors.

Also most dog parks don't let in unaltered males over 2.

To the OP: If you plan on getting your dog neutered, wait until he is at least 1 1/2 - 2 years old. He should be filled out and matured by then.
 

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I don't know I never had to teach my lab not to be aggressive and we all teach our dogs stay well before their hormones kick in so he's never run off after a female. He also doesn't mount other dogs or run away from home in search of lovin- this was not taught he just doesn't do it nor have any of my other males. Unaltered dogs get a bad rap and most of it is just hype- I see no real behavior problems and I've had more than 10 unaltered males in my lifetime. I'm inclined to think training is a huge part of all dog behavior as well, but unaltered males aren't prone to some of the behaviors we hear about at least in my experience.

When you say wait to neuter what age are you talking? Neutering a senior dog is risky as with any surgery where sedation is used, but waiting until three isn't anymore dangerous than waiting till 1-2 years of age. I agree the chances of getting some of these health issues is reduced when not neutering and never implied that meant there were fewer diseases- just a lower incidence of your dog getting them if intact. Neutering alters hormones which alter the way body systems work and has nothing to do with the owner at all. Owners can not defy genetics and can only provide the best food, tons of exercise, and regular vetting to aide health, but even then like you said certain breeds like GSD's who are prone to some of the cancers specified in the article above may still get them. If not neutering further reduces the risk wouldn't that be the owner aiding the dog's health by choosing to keep them intact? I know your dogs were neutered because they are rescues so you had no say. Don't feel like I am attacking you or your dogs health it wasn't up to you. I'm just saying if the owner can maintain a male intact they can reduce the risk of many cancers, and while easy to cure cancers are more prevalent like testicular and prostate others like hemangiosarcoma that are a death sentence are reduced.

Keeping them intact can only reduce risks and definitely is not a guarantee they will never develop cancer- I just like to know I am reducing risk with my guys where possible:)
 

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I don't know I never had to teach my lab not to be aggressive and we all teach our dogs stay well before their hormones kick in so he's never run off after a female. He also doesn't mount other dogs or run away from home in search of lovin- this was not taught he just doesn't do it nor have any of my other males. Unaltered dogs get a bad rap and most of it is just hype- I see no real behavior problems and I've had more than 10 unaltered males in my lifetime. I'm inclined to think training is a huge part of all dog behavior as well, but unaltered males aren't prone to some of the behaviors we hear about at least in my experience.

When you say wait to neuter what age are you talking? Neutering a senior dog is risky as with any surgery where sedation is used, but waiting until three isn't anymore dangerous than waiting till 1-2 years of age. I agree the chances of getting some of these health issues is reduced when not neutering and never implied that meant there were fewer diseases- just a lower incidence of your dog getting them if intact. Neutering alters hormones which alter the way body systems work and has nothing to do with the owner at all. Owners can not defy genetics and can only provide the best food, tons of exercise, and regular vetting to aide health, but even then like you said certain breeds like GSD's who are prone to some of the cancers specified in the article above may still get them. If not neutering further reduces the risk wouldn't that be the owner aiding the dog's health by choosing to keep them intact? I know your dogs were neutered because they are rescues so you had no say. Don't feel like I am attacking you or your dogs health it wasn't up to you. I'm just saying if the owner can maintain a male intact they can reduce the risk of many cancers, and while easy to cure cancers are more prevalent like testicular and prostate others like hemangiosarcoma that are a death sentence are reduced.

Keeping them intact can only reduce risks and definitely is not a guarantee they will never develop cancer- I just like to know I am reducing risk with my guys where possible:)
I meant its the owners job to make sure the dog doesn't become aggressive, and if the dog does they need to take care of that problem. I never said its wrong to have an ualtered male, but not everyone can have an ualtered male(not saying you can't). Never said it was a problem to have an unaltered male, nor have I said its a problem. Most unaltered males who are problems or cause problems are from irresponsible owners.

Neutering too old such as seniors is kind of risky and neutering to young is also too risky. I would wait(for breeds like GSDs) be 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 years. But for smaller dogs, if you plan on neutering, neutering at six months is fine, because small dogs tend to mature faster than bigger dogs. If you wait for the dog to mature and fill out then neuter, then thats fine. Genetics also depends on the breeder if the dog came from a breeder. I know what neutering does. Other ways to reduce cancer risks are not just neutering. Also only one of my dogs is from a rescue, my other was from a byb/oops litter, we spayed her because we didn't want to deal with heat cycles, and all that comes with it, also the fact she came from a byb/oops litter was an influence to spay her, we didn't want to take the chance of her having a litter.(I have a male and female).

My dog's health depends on me and my family. It is the owners job to keep them healthy by feeding them, excising them, getting their vaccines and getting a vet check up.

Also neutering a dog also reduces such cancers too as well. My previous male, and the male I have now are neutered and healthy. It can go both ways. I am not saying leaving a male dog intact is wrong, or unhealthy. It really does depend on the owner for many things such as keeping the dog healthy, training and controlling unwanted behaviors.

If someone wants to keep their dog intact, then I am all for it,as long as they are a responsible owners. If someone wants to get their dog neutered, then I am all for it,as long as they are responsible owners. There are idiot irresponsible owners of both intact and neutered males.I have my male intact because he came from a shelter, I will always neuter my males because I don't want to take the chance of him adding to the overpopulation, and I feel he will be healthier and have a lesser chance of getting any cancers because my current male and previous male were healthy and didn't have any problems since they were intact.
 

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I'm confused a little by your response but it's late,lol I agree it is the owners choice to neuter or not and I guess my choice in all except two males I've owned were to keep them intact:) To each their own though!!!!
 
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