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Discussion Starter #1
Yes, yet another neuter thread.

Lately I have really questioned my decision to neuter. He was 10 months, and training was going wonderfully, completely social dog, well tempered in all situations, trusted him off leash every where. But still I neutered him, well, my vet recommended it be done ASAP she wanted 6 months.

I noticed immediately afterwards that his energy toned down, he quit marking, his mentality sort of regressed moreso to a young pup.

Well, a month after, his energy returned and with a vengeance! Prey drive increased tenfold, in turn his obedience was amazing working for tug/ball, and his temperament remained rock solid. The past month he has once again begun marking.

But still, I don't know why I neutered him. What was the point again? What are some of your reasoning to do so?

The only positive I can really take from is the reduced risk of prostate cancer. Otherwise I feel like it just set his mental and physical growth back some.
 

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I think the point is $400 for a 10 minute surgery. That's just me. ;)
 

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Yes, yet another neuter thread.

Lately I have really questioned my decision to neuter. He was 10 months, and training was going wonderfully, completely social dog, well tempered in all situations, trusted him off leash every where. But still I neutered him, well, my vet recommended it be done ASAP she wanted 6 months.

I noticed immediately afterwards that his energy toned down, he quit marking, his mentality sort of regressed moreso to a young pup.

Well, a month after, his energy returned and with a vengeance! Prey drive increased tenfold, in turn his obedience was amazing working for tug/ball, and his temperament remained rock solid. The past month he has once again begun marking.

But still, I don't know why I neutered him. What was the point again? What are some of your reasoning to do so?

The only positive I can really take from is the reduced risk of prostate cancer. Otherwise I feel like it just set his mental and physical growth back some.
Vets scare you with the prostate cancer. It is rare, so no reason to neuter for that. In most of Europe neutering is not general practice. I have a friend whose GSD was neutered at 6 months because as the vet said: he would become aggressive, run off to breed females and yes that prostate cancer. He is 3 years old, has a dull coat (he is a long hair), no muscle and slower than an old retriever. Very sad.
As long as things go well I would never neuter the males. Adolescence can be tricky but you have to work them through it.
I can take WD (intact, 16 months old) everywhere, no aggression ever, gets along with all dogs. Well, I make sure he sees safe dogs and avoid dog parks.
I am glad you waited until ten months so he maintained some male behavior.
 

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Everyone tells me I should do it when he's three.
 

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yeah, i've been thinking the same. animals normally aren't neutered or spayed in the wild. it could decrease certain risks, but at the same time, it's like we human neuter/spay ourselves just to avoid same risks. i don't plan to spay my girl. i've been wondering why should i spay her when i wanna have dogs my whole life. where i come from, people rarely spay their females. they watch them though, when in heat and no accidents happen. males are never neuter. i do think it should be the owner responsibility that his/her dog doesn't go mating everywhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
My sentiment has been confirmed, is that I have jipped myself out of cash, and my dog out of a pair of perfectly good balls.

Oh well. What can I do? Life goes on. Just another reminder for myself, to always do your research and thoroughly!

At 15 months, he is full of balanced energy, and looks beautiful and gets better looking. Still could not ask for a better dog.

Curious though, @Sunflowers, why neuter at 3 years when all of "that" will likely be long past?
 

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Sunflowers: who cares about "Everyone". "Everyone" always has an opinion (like me :) ) Follow your own gut instincts.

K4stles: female dogs do benefit from spay; risk of mammary cancer is reduced, no risk of pyometra (infected uterus) or false pregnancy. No hassle with heats and having to raise and find homes for puppies.
I personally will look into a partial spay for my next female: just removing the ovaries and that 's stealing the thread for which I apologize.
 

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Personally I prefer having a vasectomy to neutering. When I have a dog neutered, I prefer to wait until he's at least 18 to 24 months old.
 

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I personally think its a lifestyle thing.

When it comes to male dogs...if you want to visit dog parks weekly, go to off-lead doggy events, generally enjoy seeing your dog interact with other dogs, leave your dog in the yard unattended, what I would call "regular American pet ownership," then you should neuter because it does decrease the risk of certain things happening.

When it comes to female dogs...all of the things I mentioned for the males and, if you don't have ANY plans on breeding, are trialing/training, have an intact male in the house that you want to keep stress free, it might be worth your while to spay. I know people that are really into trialing, and because his female isn't on a regular cycle, he can't trial for about 4 months out of the year. She might be ready to trial...but he can't sign her up due to the uncertainty of where she will be in her cycle. Just as bad is that he can't bring her to the club during her heat.

I'm hoping to get a female in about a year. My plan is to wait for a heat cycle or two and then spay. My boy is intact and will stay that way...he also loses his mind when there is a female in heat around, just better to keep them both happy.

I kind of agree with FlyAway's comment as well. When discussing the neuter decision with my vet...it sounded like he just wanted the money for a "simple/routine" surgery. When I brought my boy in this year for his annual check up...the vet was shocked at how well behaved/calm my boy was (he didn't realize he was still intact). I guess they just see way too many intact, wild, uncontrollable dogs, and from what I've seen...taking the balls off does help to calm them a little.

The problem I see with doing it in the 6-12 month range is that you can't pinpoint the temperament change to the spueter or just the fact that the dog matured. Lots of people will tell you how their dog did a complete 180 after a neuter...but it was going to do that anyways going from puppy to adult (although mines almost 3 and I'm still waiting for him to mature).
 

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I didn't have a choice with Pongu. The shelter's ironclad policy was that no dog leaves unaltered, not even a puppy. At the time I didn't really know anything about anything so I was all "sure whatever."

Since then I've become skeptical of pediatric neuters. They're useful in communities where people are frequently irresponsible about keeping their dogs from unchecked breeding, so I won't say the procedure is completely worthless... but in my experience, pediatric neuters tend to grow up to be somewhat gangly and disproportionate (long legs, feminine appearance; Pongu's often mistaken for a female), and I suspect there's some correlation with increased dog-dog reactivity and high-strung behavior. To be fair, though, I work mostly with shelter dogs (which make up most of the pediatric neuters) and mostly with ones who have behavioral issues (or else they wouldn't be coming to me in the first place). So it could be just a skewed sample that I'm seeing.

Crookytail was neutered as an adult and I noticed no change in him after the procedure. He still marks a LOT and behaves the same. The reason I had him fixed is because (a) we live in the middle of a major city and un-fixed adult dogs are not allowed in our dog parks, which are the only/best option for daily off-leash exercise in our neighborhood; (b) he's a goofy galoot of a mutt who was never going to be bred anyhow; (c) given that he was fully mature, I didn't see any drawbacks to having it done; and (d) he was coming in as the second dog, and I already knew that Pongu had problems with intact males, so if I'd kept Crooky intact I would have had a much harder time getting those two to live together.

That said, if/when I get a purebred working dog, I intend to keep that dog intact until I can at least see how its competition career pans out. My hope is that the dog will be good enough to be worth breeding, but even if that doesn't happen, I'm never doing a pediatric neuter again.
 

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Curious though, @Sunflowers, why neuter at 3 years when all of "that" will likely be long past?
Because of his prostate.

He has already had trouble with it being enlarged because he is being stimulated by scents-- vet suspects there are unaltered females in the neighborhood.
The prostate got enlarged and led to an impacted anal gland. Not fun.

Vet says the only fix for this is neutering, but he, too, suggests we manage it as best we can and wait until he is three. We are supplementing with probiotics, Tinkle Tonic, raspberry ketones, and Solid Gold Berry Balance.

Hormones are there for a good reason, and needed for mental and physical maturity. He should fill out as he was meant to at three, when he is fully grown.
Neutering early results, mentally, in the dog being a perpetual adolescent.

All of the above were opinions of people I consider to be experienced and knowledgeable.
 

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You know, I went through this same thing pretty much....questioning myself on WHY I am even going to neuter him. I had the appointment set for when he was 6 months old, and the day before it, I called and cancelled because I was having doubts. LOL. I didnt feel comfortable doing it......and I am *so* glad I didnt. He is 10.5 months now, and behaves extremely well for an intact male of this age. He hardly marks, doesnt hump, doesnt try to run away etc. I know I can prevent him from impregnating any female dogs, so I figured....why should I neuter him? I have *no* reason to. So, he is going to stay intact, and will only be neutered if a medical reason inclines me to do so.

I think the biggest deciding factor was the risks of hemangiosarcoma being increased...I know its not a for sure thing, but I didnt want to risk it.
 

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Because of his prostate.

He has already had trouble with it being enlarged because he is being stimulated by scents-- vet suspects there are unaltered females in the neighborhood.
The prostate got enlarged and led to an impacted anal gland. Not fun.

Vet says the only fix for this is neutering, but he, too, suggests we manage it as best we can and wait until he is three. We are supplementing with probiotics, Tinkle Tonic, raspberry ketones, and Solid Gold Berry Balance.

Hormones are there for a good reason, and needed for mental and physical maturity. He should fill out as he was meant to at three, when he is fully grown.
Neutering early results, mentally, in the dog being a perpetual adolescent.

All of the above were opinions of people I consider to be experienced and knowledgeable.
If it is for a medical reason, then I would certainly do it but only after a second or third opinion.
 

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K4stles: female dogs do benefit from spay; risk of mammary cancer is reduced, no risk of pyometra (infected uterus) or false pregnancy. No hassle with heats and having to raise and find homes for puppies.
i believe what you say, BUT i swear on my life i saw none of this in any unspayed dog when i lived in my country, except for the hassle with heats. raising and finding homes for the puppies could be a problem if you don't want to breed your dog. otherwise, i don't see a problem with that.
 

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I had a foster dog with pyometra once. It was pretty scary, and because we had to get an emergency spay, quite expensive. Because of that experience, I think I'd be a lot more inclined to spay a female dog than I would be to neuter a male.

Of course, I wouldn't judge anyone who made an educated and responsible decision to keep their female intact, either.
 

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It's thankfully rare, but we do meet male dogs that target my intact male dog on occasion. And, while my dog is controlled with strict heel and recall commands when passing other dogs, and has a couple shepherd body guards that will drive off an aggressing male if it continues to come at us- I often hear from the offending owner the - "my dog is NEVER aggressive" thing and "it must be your dog's fault". Uh-huh. So that is why we don't do dog parks.

Having an neutered male is less stress but for me the benefits outweigh the costs of extra training and awareness.
 

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I would never neuter a male GSD of mine. I don't see any reason to do it (unless something came up). Lucky the vet I now use never asked me to do it with my Kaos after I said no one time (he started going to this vet at around 3). With my puppy Havoc he remembered and hasn't asked and won't. However it used to aggravate me with a previous vet. When I had Genesis. They would ask every time he went in. All the way up until he was ten. One of the reasons I don't use them any more......

Just my opinion. But I think this whole neuter thing is one big scam to make $$$. That combined with people who shouldn't own dogs to begin with that wind up in shelters.....

I remember one poor poster a year or so ago. They had their GSD neutered and the poor dog died from the anesthesia. I felt really bad for them....

(edit) I should add in I am not trying to force my opinion on anyone who did it. Or imply something bad. I would just never do it.....
 

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I don't see any point to it. My Jack is approaching 3 and he's still intact. While I have considered it, I haven't actually made any plans to "fix" him. Mind you, I manage my dogs Very Closely, so there's no chance of him mating. I've adopted all my dogs as rescues, though, and do see the benefit for the general public to neuter their pets, especially the resident backyard dogs who will hop a fence, etc.

But, I don't think you need to worry over what's done. It's done :)
 

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I do believe that all dogs that come out of rescue/shelter/pound should be neutered or spayed. Not everyone out there that is rescuing dogs is that good of a person and cares that much about the dog overpopulation issue. Many people just want a dog and can't afford a purebred from a breeder.

I've always admitted to the fact that if someone offered me a nice little stud fee for my boy, I'd strongly consider it. I consider myself pretty well off...but $500 to $1000 for my dog doing a little bit of work does sound pretty nice. To me that would be a new golf club or an iPad...to some people its rent. Even those of us with the best intentions can fall victim when the greenbacks start calling.

I think that if the only reason you're leaving your dogs intact is so they don't grow up "leggy." You're doing it for the wrong reasons. If you're adopting...you shouldn't really worry too much about what your dog looks like and just be happy you're getting a healthy dog and you're giving it a great home.
 
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