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SO SO SO many opinions on this. I’m a two year old guy when done with puberty. Daycare is an issue though after six months.

What a your philosophy and why?
Thanks


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If you (general you, not you personally) are going to neuter, my preference would be not before 2. I have a 6 yr old intact male. Never had an issue. He marked in a store one time, I set him up the next time and corrected him. Issue over. No temperament issues at all that people claim come with intact males. Bottom line for me is if you are a responsible person that can keep your dog from breeding unintentionally and not breed irresponsibly, then there is no reason to neuter and it's a personal choice.
 

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My opinion has changed from early neuter to waiting until they're a few years old ......hoping that keeping the hormones around longer in this breed that's known for dysplasia and arthritis will maybe help joints develop better and just might help them have less issues later in life...and you're right spay/neuter ranks right up there with the ongoing great dog food debate....and of course there's always those opinions out there on very early spay for females trying to avoid mammary cancer...nowadays there's some experts "study" on every thing pick a subject.. there's likely one out there with results on the best way to breath air....just sayin'
 

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I think alot of the health issues are just dumb luck along with the specific genetics on the dog you get. We spayed a Boxer early. She lived to be 13, which is unheard of for Boxers. 2nd female Boxer, spayed at 3 years. She was over 12. Both backyard bred dogs with no pedigree history. Boxers just don't live past 10 years but both of ours did with quality of life until a few months before the end.

My Jax - adopted out of a shelter. Spayed at 4-6 months. Supposedly a GSD/BC mix. HD, torn acl, died of hemangio at just 10 years. We hit all the big 3 on the early spay list of correlations.

All minimal vaccinations. Boxers at kibble. Jax ate raw. I did everything "right" and still lost her early.

So while I firmly believe there is a correlation, I think there are other unknown factors that play into that as well.
 

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I also do not neuter unless a medical reason came up.

I hear you on the daycare care. I mean, I do not do dog daycare. It's against my philosophies on dog life (random group dog play) but there are other things that we have been excluded from due to my dog's sporting their Devil's Acorns. There are a few bars in South NJ that allow you to bring your dogs, and there are leashed only areas (like patios) ...but no intact males allowed. No Yappy hour at Bark In The Park for you!! And there is a 1.50 surcharge per testicle on the dog license. LOL

You can actually save money by having someone come in midday and spend a half hour letting your dog out, feeding him if needed, etc. Most dog walkers around here in a suburb of NYC charge 15 to 25 per half hour visit. Dog daycare around here is 45 to 60 per day. I am way more comfortable getting to know a personal dog caretaker. I have a college age sitter who charges 25 per day to hang out with my dogs if I have a long day, and she charges 50 per 24 hours if it involves an overnight. Boarding at a kennel runs about 60 to 90 a night. So it is a no brainer for me.
 

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My Boxer Hound mix Bo. He stayed with my ex after we divorced. BUT he was neutered at 6 months (shelter dog). He has never been to the vet except for vaccines. He is 11 and still chasing down skunk and groundhogs in my ex's yard. He has perfected skunk killing without getting sprayed. They circle face to face and duel until Bo goes in lighting quick for a head grab. Then I have had early spay dogs that had early incontinence, early neuter dogs that had behavioral issues. They have hunches, they have some evidence here and there, but I think a lot more into a dog's projected timeline genetics wise, over what is done to them.

That said, if things aren't broken I don't fix them. I don't know why anyone would think there are not ramifications from a pediatric neuter. Hormones contribute so much more to growth than just sexuality. Brain development, bone development. Hormones are the messengers that turn things on and off at the right time. So me personally I don't neuter at all..but if I did it would be after age 2.
 

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Our older dog was neutered at 6 months. He is oversized, has always had problems with his weight and now has joint issues. It's a constant struggle to keep him at a decent weight.

Our younger dog at 6 is intact. There have been no problems whatsoever with him. No marking, no aggression, no running off to find females, nothing that "people" claim would happen. He's a great dog and very healthy.

We had a female, spayed at 4 months who had the worst hips our vet had ever seen. She died at the ripe old age of 3 from hemangio.

Another male we had was neutered young and tore his ACL. He was just running easily across the yard when that happened. He was also taller than the standard.

To me, neutering is completely unnecessary. I've learned my lessons, thanks to this forum. The only exception for me would be for a medical issue that could not be solved any other way.
 

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The hips and acl correlation makes sense to me. Early spay/neuter makes them leggy, putting stress on the ligaments. Take away the growth hormones, bones don't grow correctly.
 

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There is no doubt that the genetics a dog is born with plays a huge role in that dog's health. Poor conformation alone can take its toll on joints. There is undoubtedly a strong genetic component to behavior, cancers, and other health conditions.

When considering neutering, you have to think of it as something that may compound a dog's inherent predisposition to behavior and health issues.

One thing a lot of people fail to think about when deciding on the best age to neuter is that hormones play a major, synergistic role in health until a dog's final days. Waiting until two years of age helps with joint problems due to unnatural growth caused by early neutering but hormones continue to have an impact on joint health beyond the growth period and that is only one example among many.

My personal preference is to keep my dogs intact unless a health condition forces my hand. If it ain't broke, don't fix it.
 
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I wait till 2 years or more. However, if male is exceptional, I will keep him intact and may use as stud. I have seen many dogs who lost their drive or had health complications when neutered before 1 year. Moreover, if you have a well-trained dog, hormones shouldn't be a big problem. I may sound ignorant, but to me they feel less "Dog" when neutered too soon.
 

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All my previous dogs were adopted as adult females already spayed. My childhood dog was spay at 6 months. They led good lives. It wasn't until I started researching GSDs from good breeders that I found out about delayed de-sexing. My almost 6 year old male is still intact. He doesn't roam and has never had an oops litter. He does love love love the scent of a sweet young thing, which can be annoying, but other than that he is great. Well, he did get a rash on his testicles that took awhile to heal. That wasn't pleasant.

My female went through 2 heats and got de-sexed at 18 months. I had been considering an ovary sparing spay but when she was in her 2nd heat, our poor boy cried for a week and a half and my gal was bored being locked up in her crate most of the day for nearly a month. For all our sanity, that was a good time to get her snipped.
 

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I don't have an issue spaying an adult female. I think the real risk of pyometra as an adult outweighs the hormones. I do wonder if there is a hormone replacement for dogs like there is for people.
 

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Most intact males really do act different in a social setting and it can be a problem. I've had plenty of boarding and daycare dogs who may have remained happily social if they had been neutered early but lost it because of staying intact. I've talked to professionals who run huge programs with group social dog experience who say the same.

Some can kind of resocialize after neutering as adults and have some luck.

My 4 y/o male shepherd is still intact and he does better socially than most. He will still play very nicely with neutered males.

My lab is a little over 16 mo and I just neutered him. I had planned to get him to 2 but there was some weird stuff starting between him and my older male. They have never had a fight but the dynamic was changing and I know my older male can be totally fine with adult neutered males so I decided to go ahead and do it for the sake of our family dynamic.

I came *this* close to cancelling the surgery because they just seemed fine and I thought this is stupid and then my husband reminded me how many times I had commented "I don't think we are going to make it to 2 with this one"

It's too soon from his surgery to really know how it will effect the dynamic but I am watching curiously.

I want my dogs healthy...this pup is one of the healthiest and hardiest I've ever had. OFA prelims were good/normal. Tons of health testing behind him. He is active and healthy weight. Wish I could have kept his nuts longer but if it had made for more tension in my house I just don't think it's worth it. I do not want a crate and rotate life ESPECIALLY since one is a service dog! Just no.

His breeder recommended to neuter at 1yr, and we made it longer than that, so...

If your dogs have a different social life, don't play with many new dogs, it probably wouldn't effect you at all.

My position is...do the best you can within reason and gowever its safe and sensible for your and your dog's life.
 

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Both my boys have all their gear. One is AKC that I plan on trialing with and the other a dobie gsd mix. They haven’t had any issues with marking and have their dog friends too, but are definitely not overly social with people or strange dogs. Which is fine by me.

My female is spayed and they don’t come into contact with intact females. If they were to by an off chance in public they are under restraint. I haven’t seen any reason to neuter them in my situation.
 

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There is no need to neuter a dog. It is promoted by vets to make money. I am willing to bet there are no male members on this forum who have been neutered.
Because of our egos, we just call it marriage. Combined with age, the results are comparable.
 

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Because of our egos, we just call it marriage. Combined with age, the results are comparable.
:laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh: :laugh:
 

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I don't have an issue spaying an adult female. I think the real risk of pyometra as an adult outweighs the hormones. I do wonder if there is a hormone replacement for dogs like there is for people.
Does Pyometra affect the ovaries or is it just a uterine infection? I know with people a lot of uterine woes and risks are avoided by partial hysterectomy ..which is basically ovary sparing.
 

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I have to ask if anyone here has ever dealt with spay incontinence? It will make its appearance gradually after the spay surgery. The cause is the fact that it is a total hysterectomy which means estrogen drastically drops so, the urethra sphincter muscles weaken. The cause is lack of estrogen hormones.

Anyone deal with this issue?

Did you just live with it, or treat it? You can try hormone replacement. There are other prescriptions that reduce the leaks too.

It's not a harmful condition, but it surely is messy and annoying. I've known of a few people that have dogs with spay incontinence.

I'm now wondering if doing a tubal ligation to keep everything intact is a better option. That would preserve the ovaries, keeping the hormones running as nature intended, but you prevent potential of pregnancies. Yeah, there are risks, but let's be clear here that a spay surgery, despite having become like a rite of passage, being so routine, is still a seriously invasive surgical procedure. I don't take spay or neuter surgery lightly.

I'm still all for spay and neuter for the majority of dog owners out there. Fact is, most people aren't that responsible, so their dogs should be spay/neutered from the get go. For the rest of us that have a clue here, we can make that determination to spay neuter sooner or later ourselves. I will say living with an intact male dog sometimes is no issue at all. It does depend on individual factors. However, living with an intact female dog is another story. It's not something I willingly want to manage, but it's not that difficult to deal with heat cycles + keep your female constantly supervised at that time. I've known of breeders that have several intact dogs that have never had accidental pregnancies, or behavior issues. Yet, for the general public here in the USA, I have no faith in the responsibility of most people so, I encourage spay neuter, period.

Interestingly in Norway, neutering is generally considered inhumane so, dogs are left intact. I think in Sweden it's also common for dogs to be left intact. But mentioning Norway, here's a link as evidence, so you all know I'm not making this up -->

https://jennifermargulis.net/norwegians-believe-spaying-or-neutering-a-dog-is-cruel/

https://sciencenorway.no/animal-welfare-forskningno-norway/should-dogs-be-neutered/1419580


Anyways, about spay incontinence??? Have you dealt with this issue?
 
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