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Discussion Starter #1
Can anyone tell me when I should get Rex neutered? I had heard 4 months now I read on here 2 years so I am very confused and just want to do what is best. He is an indoor dog goes out with me for exercise and gets along great with my 5 year old rescued spayed female doberman.
 

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If you are sure you are capable of keeping him from reproducing, I would wait until he is at least 2yo or not neuter him at all. I would NOT do it at 4 months no matter WHAT the vet says!
 

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here's a site with some information
http://www.gopetsamerica.com/dog-health/spay_neuter_risks_benefits.aspx

I know I've had one vet say wait until at least 2 if ever and another who advocated neutering at 6 months.

From what I've read and heard, I agree with waiting until at least two years old if you can control your dog (prevent unwanted pregnancies).

Makes sense me that the dogs need their natural hormones to develop properly .
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Having another dog in the house and him being an inside dog will he not start marking before 2 years?
 

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Depends on the dog. IMO, marking in the house is more of a housebreaking "issue" than an "intact male" issue.

My male is intact and will be 10yo on the 29th. He has NEVER marked in the house even when sharing it with 2 other intact males. Not even when Siren was in heat did he EVER even attempt to mark in the house.

My males littermate "Butch" used to live here too. HE DID attempt to mark in the house ONCE. We had a "come to jesus meeting" and he NEVER did it again.

If you are asking about him marking OUTSIDE, then he probably will. But as long as it is outside, who cares.
 

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Quote:Depends on the dog.
Depends on the dog AND the owner. Do NOT tolerate this behavior. IF you live with others, spouse, children , roomies etc, be certain <u>nobody</u> tolerates it.
Quote:HE DID attempt to mark in the house ONCE. We had a "come to jesus meeting" and he NEVER did it again.
Exactly! Dog AND owner.
 

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I agree with the suggestion to wait until the dog is at least 2 or don't have it done at all, as long as he isn't allowed to roam.

I have a 7 year old intact dog who has been bred several times who lives with intact females and he doesn't mark in the house. My family always kept intact males as pets when I was younger and they never marked either, even when we had three living together. There is a lot of propaganda out there about intact animals and benefits of altering. Most of what you read is very one sided, half truths or outright lies intended to sway people into altering their pet. The Animal Rights movement has made spaying/neutering PC to shelters, the general public and even pet professionals such as vets, trainers and groomers using this propaganda over the past couple decades.
 

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My vet recomended to have my boy neutered as soon as everything dropped. We had it done at 4.5 months. He healed very well with no complications. I dont know much about the controversy of waiting longer....but I trust my vet and she said the younger the better for large dogs, so that is what I did.

Our old dog (non-gsd) who is 14 was neutered at 4 months old as well....and he has never had any issues.
 

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I heard the big reason is testosterone helps build bone and muscle mass. That said, I had Otto done right after his first birthday. I was starting to see some behaviors that lead me to believe he'd start cruising for chicks soon.

Also, his breeder has a strict policy about not registering the dogs until they are sp/neutered
 

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In my contract with the breeder for Stark, it states that I can not neuter until he is atleast 9 months old.

I plan to wait longer, closer to the 1-2 year mark just for the reasons mentioned above (build bone, muscle mass, etc..).
 

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There is no study that says that although it seems to be a widespread misconception. I think it's based on a misunderstanding of the conclusions of the Rottie/osteosarcoma study's results.

If it were me, I'd neuter around 8 months. With the exception of the Rottie study, there isn't any scientific evidence that waiting longer than that confers any benefit even if it's the widespread opinion of people on this board. And the Rottie study didn't conclude that neutering at a year or later than a year was protective, it looked at lifetime increased risk versus lifetime spent unaltered in a breed known for a high incidence of osteosarcoma.

I'd agree that there really aren't the health benefits to neutering that there are to spaying but I think the behavioral benefits can be substantial. Yes, you can definitely have an intact male who doesn't mark and who gets along well with other male dogs, but after fostering hundreds of dogs, I can definitely say that your odds of not marking and not fighting are better with a neutered dog. For most pet owners, neutering is going to help them have a pet they can live with and reduce the incidence of some of the behaviors that cause people to give dogs up.
 

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When I adopted my 9 weeks old gsd he was already fixed... and the first night he got home he already raped my hello kitty... I just wonder if he had a clean fixed or he was too young or it's gonna happen no matter what?
 

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Originally Posted By: pupresqThere is no study that says that although it seems to be a widespread misconception. I think it's based on a misunderstanding of the conclusions of the Rottie/osteosarcoma study's results.
I don't see how you can misunderstand this statement (taken from the study notes - the bolding is mine):

Quote:To determine whether there was an association between
endogenous sex hormones and risk of bone sarcoma,
relative risk (RR) of incidence rates and hazard ratios for
bone sarcoma were calculated for dogs subdivided on the
basis of lifetime gonadal hormone exposure. Bone
sarcoma was diagnosed in 12.6% of dogs in this cohort
during 71,004 dog-months follow-up. Risk for bone
sarcoma was significantly influenced by age at gonadectomy. Male and female dogs that underwent gonadectomy before 1 year of age had an approximate one in four lifetime risk for bone sarcoma and were significantly more likely to develop bone sarcoma than dogs that were sexually intact [RR 95% CI  3.8 (1.5–9.2) for males; RR 95% CI  3.1 (1.1– 8.3) for females].
Here is a link to the study notes:

http://www.rawdogranch.com/EarlySpayNeuter.pdf
 

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Another quote from the study (again, bolding is mine):

Quote:Females were more often diagnosed with bone sarcoma than males, however, the difference was not statistically significant [hazard ratio (95% CI)  1.01 (0.66–1.55); P  0.97] (Table 2). Age at gonadectomy significantly influenced risk for bone sarcoma. Both males and females that developed bone sarcoma were sexually intact for significantly fewer months than dogs that did not develop bone sarcoma (Table 2) [hazard ratios (95% CI)  0.98 (0.98–0.99) for males and 0.98 (0.97–0.99) for females; P  0.0001 for both]. In multivariate analysis, months intact remained significantly inversely associated with bone sarcoma risk after controlling for gender, adult height, and adult body weight (P  0.0001; Table 3). For each additional month of being sexually intact, there was a 1.4% reduction in bone sarcoma risk.
 

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The misunderstanding is that 1 year of age represents some kind of magic number where gonadectomy prior to a year increases cancer risk but gonadectomy afterwards does not. That's not what the study is saying. The study correlated lifetime risk with lifetime alteration status. So waiting until your dog is a year old isn't protective and doing it before your dog is a year old isn't necessarily consigning them to cancer.

The biggest place I see this misunderstanding play out is with female dogs where people trade the very real benefits of the "magic number" of spaying before first heat versus after it, for a marginal decrease in the risk of osteosarcoma. They think by spaying after a couple heats that they're getting the best of both worlds when in fact they're actually getting the worst of both.

Does that make sense? They weren't comparing dogs neutered at one year with dogs neutered after a year. The statement about dogs neutered prior to a year of age is just a benchmark and they're comparing dogs neutered prior to a year with dogs not neutered at all or neutered much much later in life.
 

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Originally Posted By: GSD SamWhen I adopted my 9 weeks old gsd he was already fixed... and the first night he got home he already raped my hello kitty...


The funny way it's put aside, Otto still jumps on my arm and makes the motion when he's anxious. Occasionally he curls his front leg around my leg, a much more endearing gesture that I encourage!
 

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Argh,this is one thing I don't like to think about. Obie was surrendered to SPCA at 8 weeks old and neutered at 9 weeks.
 
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