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I'm looking for some insight on whether it is okay to have my male puppy neutered at this time.
He had an umbilical hernia since I got him which the vet said was fine and could be removed whenever we chose to have him fixed.
We took him to the vet because the hernia doubled in size and now bothers him when we touch it. The vet moved up our neuter to this Tuesday to remove the hernia. Our puppy is only 4 1/2 months old..will an early neuter effect how big he grows to be or anything else? I've heard a few different opinions..not sure what to think. Thanks for any and all feedback.


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I'll stick my neck out... I'm a pro-neuter person, where as there are a lot of people on this forum that do not advocate neutering male dogs, even if you do not plan to breed him. That having been said; I would not recommend neutering at 4 1/2 months. He's not sexually mature, he hasn't even finished growing yet, and he runs the risk of not developing fully. I'm sure that there will be people that argue the point with me, and they may even be right. Yes, neuter your dog, I just think you should let him finish growing up first.
 

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There's nothing wrong with neutering. My male isn't, but there were reasons behind it. If you choose to neuter, try to wait until at least a year to 18 months so that he is done or close to done growing.

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I would NEVER neuter at 4.5 months old. Too many risks. However that hernia does need to be fixed asap if its getting larger.

Fix the hernia now, neuter later.

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I choose not to neuter. I think there's no medical reason to. But I do not think neutering is a wrong choice. I think if done before sexual maturity there are serious medical risks shown by numerous studies - increased risk if osteosarcoma, hemangiosarcoma. Also consider lack of secondary sexual characteristics, elongated limbs (therefore tall, gangly, and lacking masculinity)

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