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Hi guys so our pup is 7 months old now. She sleeps in our bed at night.
Tonight there was some kind of an animal that was jumping around in the bushes right outside our window. Of course she barked and I appreciate her being alert at night. However the animal did not go away and she just kept on barking. I had to take her out of the room and the whole time she was just trying to go back in there. She woke up everyone in the house and my husband was really frustrated because he leaves for work very early. I didn't know what to do with her. Her bark is very loud. I basically tried leash corrections with no luck.
Now, I'm wide awake and thinking about the fact that I've been in similar situations with her before. She starts to bark at something that isn't a "real" threat and I don't know how to get her to stop. If it's something moving in the wind like a plant that's hung, I'll bring it down, show it to her & it usually works. But in this case I couldn't take her outside to see the animal.
How do you guys get your dog to stop barking and be quiet on command? How would you or have you handled similar situations? We're new GSD owners so we're learning a lot as we go. Thank you.

P.S. she used to sleep in her crate and at 4 months I started letting her sleep on our bed and I regret it everyday. I tried putting her in it tonight and she barked inside of it as well. She does very well in the crate during the day, just not at night anymore.
 

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you start in low distraction settings. Many first teach a "speak" command and then "quiet"
I use "enough". Slowly increasing the interest in whatever they are barking at until they are reliable. Then, if the barking doesn't stop, you correct for disobeying the command.
However, you can't correct her for something that she doesn't know.

I don't allow dogs to sleep in the bed. Mostly because he snores, is a bed hog and farts a lot.
If you don't want her in the bed anymore, simply don't let her. Tether her if necessary to keep her where you want her. It will take patience because she's used to sleeping there and won't understand why she isn't allowed anymore.
 

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She actually knows "speak" so cool, were 1/2 there. Do you basically just say "enough" & then reward her for being quiet for short periods of time? Then slowly increase the time that she's quiet before rewarding?

I think about crate training her at night again all the time. I'm just avoiding it because I don't want her to keep everyone up at night with whining. I'm a little worried at how long it'll take. She's my first dog and I really wanted her to sleep with us. She only weighed like 30-35 lbs then. A few months later she's huge, she completely spreads out and she lays on our legs. She brings little sand, dirt & rock particles in the sheets. It was just a big mistake I won't make with the next dog lol
 

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The problem I think with rewarding for quiet in this context, its a competition between what means more to her. I think the results are better when shut up means you better shut up. What you may end up with the other way is her barking, stopping, then going right back to the barking.
 

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This happens occasionally with my three.Something outside in the dead of night gets them agitated and they bark and howl.If "Enough!" doesn't do anything I get up and make them settle close to me.They can see I'm not worried about whatever it is and will relax after a few minutes.Occasionally they may try to alert again but I shut it down immediately.They relax and go to sleep in just a few minutes and the drama is over.
 

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Easiest way to get rid of this issue is buy a dogtra YS300 bark collar. Then put it on her on setting 3 or so. She is allowed 1 bark and the collar will vibrate to warn her to discontinue. If she continues to bark within the next 15 seconds after that warning it stims her.
 

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It's not too late to do something about the bed situation. Mine has to wait for permission to come up each and every time. I have a dog bed for her in the bedroom and if she's bugging me I tell her "down" and then "go to your bed". She startled me a couple of times in the beginning trying to sneak up when I was asleep... lol an 80lb dog does not sneak well up on a bed and she got a short sharp reaction from me so she doesn't try that anymore. In the beginning, I had a half barricade up to keep her from leaving the bedroom - she couldn't come up on the bed, couldn't leave to go sack out in her living room chair so HER bed became a habit and the most desirable place for her....

She's not allowed up when her heats come so it was important she learn to stay down and one month out of every 6 she's down for the month - you can also train to just be on the bed for a little while each evening and then have her down and in her own bed for the rest of the night. You just can't be wishy-washy about the training for this - the bed is a supreme privilege so they will break training if you slack off at all. Mine's 2 now and it's still an evening ritual when I get ready for bed. She has to be in a sit/stay while I rearrange the bedding/get her cover in place and get in and get settled - only then is she released to come up and gets scratches and good girl.

Don't get discouraged - just get a real tight regimen going with your husband sticking to it too. Your pup is still young and this kind of house/manners training is very important.:smile2:
 

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I would go back to crate training 101. Put her in the crate with a kong filled with something to keep her busy. Leave her in there even if she makes noise. Do not talk to her while she is in the crate. It may help to cover the crate also. Since she was crate trained before and then you let her sleep on the bed she is abusing the privilege and needs to be reminded that it is your bed and her getting up there is not going to be a regular thing every night. She will be stubborn about it and will bark and whine at first but this will pass. Also you should know that at around 7 months they go through a fear stage where they will bark at a thing they have seen every day of their life with you but suddenly decide it is scary. Let the pup work through it. Don't comfort, coddle, or tell her it's alright. She will figure it out. Mine was suddenly afraid of a giant coral rock that had always been in our yard. She barked and ran around and barked some more. I just sat and watched. Gradually she got closer and closer, still barking, until she finally got all the way up to the rock and realized it was the same immobile object that had always been there. She never barked at it again. This too will pass.
 
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