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Hey guys so I've been doing a lot of reading around here and I was wondering if some experienced owners can give me some tools to prepare for any situations that could arise with my 6 month old german Shepard ..

What is the best way to deal with a dog that could possibly growl at you ? I've seen the old ceaser Milan fellow who yanks the lead when they display unwanted behaviour but then I've read from others that a growl is a blessing from the dog to avoid a possible bite.

Personally I feel if they growl at you it's disrespect but hey I'm not an expert .

I won't beat around the bush at the moment I've been using the touch to correct her or putting her gently on her side .. Especially when she is rough with my little dog who is 4 kgs. She is quite head strong I've split up fights on a few occasions and I've been bit by my gsd while breaking up the fight .. She did not bite on purpose was more of a redirection bite cause I was in the middle of it separating 2 furious dogs.

Anyway just trying to get the right tools to maintain the confidence to be a confident leader . I'm pretty new to large breeds so I'm getting as much tools as I can .

Ps she is very sweet quite aloof but enjoys a pat here and there , loves chasing the ball , she is reasonably obedient without food , I follow all the rules in the sense -

Sitting before entering and editing doors
Sitting and waiting for the command to eat
Trying to teach her to heal
Does not go on our furniture (due to my inexperience - cant afford leadership challenges )
I socialise her alot .. Plenty of walks ..
I always ensure she is gentle with my little Papion

Thanks guys
 

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To be honest I wouldn't use touch or place your dog on her side as any kind of correction. I'd train your dog to break whatever she was doing with a word, then reward her when she does that.
I wouldn't worry about who come in or out a door first either, I've never understood exactly what that is supposed to signify. As you've already learned, redirection can be costly. It would be better to observe body language and put a stop to any aggressive displays before they escalate. She must learn that a single word from you means to back off, and in turn will do more to protect your smaller dog. With my dog, Archer, I say 'out!' and that's it, he immediately leaves alone whatever it is I want. Archer is ball driven, so it was actually fun to teach him this, the moment he did what he was told he got his favourite rubber ball, within a few training sessions he was BOUNDING to me once I said 'Out'.
Be patient, your dog is still a puppy, correct verbally, reward lavishly with praise and hopefully you will have a nice easy going dog at the end of it.

Oh and a growl is a 'warning', dogs warn for a variety of reasons. What was the situation in which she growled?
 

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I'm confused is she growling at you or another dog / person?

You indicate you have done a lot of socialization with her but you have had to break up dog fights? Doesnt sound like your socialization has gone well. (nothing against you, my dog has the same issues)

Do you have a muzzle for her to protect other animals including your own if she has already been in fights?

What kind of "socialization" have you done with her?
 

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If you're forcing her on her side ( and I do blame C Millan for this garbage) she might very well bite you. Dogs do not like to be man-handled in this fashion and it's downright dangerous. Growling is not disrespect, it's a warning that your dog in uncomfortable and anxious. Heed that growl.

Also that 'touch' CM does could also get a person bitten in a redirection. Seriously, 6 months is a baby, she shouldnd't be growling at you and you need to manage both dogs better so that there are no fights, a GSD- even a young one- could easily kill a pap without breaking stride. Worry less about doors and furniture and make sure this dog has plenty of exercise and careful training that does not make her more anxious. Talk to a trainer, and keep your little dog safe.
 

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A growl is a warning, listen to it, don't punish for it. Many reasons for a growl, first learn why the growl, then learn to train for the reasons causing the growl.

Not knocking CM, he did take on aggressive dogs that others had failed - he was successful with some, others he wasn't. I'm not sure a lot of his methods could be emulated by the average dog owner without getting bit.

Since you are new to large breeds as you said, I would suggest the first thing to do is joining a training class. Be sure the trainer knows GSD and working dogs. They would be able to help determine WHY your pup is fighting with other dogs and hopefully demonstrate a safe way for you to break any future fights safely. The class will give you the best tools you need, your pup learning obedience and YOU learning to train your pup.

This page - Nothing In Life is Free - can help you with understanding the no furniture etc.
 

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Take her to a good breed trainer if one is available, and get some experienced advice from a person who can "read" your dog and her behaviors. It is difficult to give competent advice on growling without seeing the dog. :) I get paid to solve these kinda of issues and I won't give specific advice unless I see the dog. She's still young, address this now and more than likely it can be sorted out.
 
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