German Shepherds Forum banner
1 - 20 of 35 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,331 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone ever gone to a LID diet for allergies then added back foods to find out what your dog is allergic to? How does that type of testing work? If you did it, were you successful in eliminating all food allergies? We have two choices. One is to stay with the prescription novel protein diet indefinitely, maybe for the rest of his life. The other is to gradually add back foods and hope we can find out which ones don’t cause allergies, then try to find a food that only includes non allergen foods. It seems that proteins are the primary allergen, so raw is completely out. There could be other secondary allergens.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,255 Posts
I’ve never done an elimination diet with a dog before. I have with babies when nursing to see why they all had horrible colic, and found dairy and gluten to be an issue while I was breastfeeding. I’m sure there is no correlation from that to a dog though, sorry! Lol

Lyka has a sensitive stomach, and gets itchy on certain foods, but I didn’t go the elimination route for ingredients, I lucked out and found Fromm caused no reactions with one switch, so that’s probably not super helpful either. Sorry!

What problems is she/he having that make you want to do an elimination diet?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,041 Posts
I've done it a long time ago. I believe the method we used was one novel protein and one novel carbohydrate only for 30 full days. after which introducing one single ingredient per 30 day period. But they have to be non symptomatic on the first novel pair before you can introduce something else. If they aren't then you might have to try another novel protein/carb pair and wait another month

I did design her a diet based on her allergy test results that I home cooked for 6 or 7 years and she did fantastic on it. I eased her on to the home made diet as above, one ingredient at a time until I felt I had enough different ingredients that she was getting enough nutrition.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,331 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I wonder why they haven’t done a blood test on my dog for food allergies. We know what he’s not allergic to but not what is causing the reactions. I will ask them. The specialist told me adding food back is very tedious and can take a long time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,041 Posts
I wonder why they haven’t done a blood test on my dog for food allergies. We know what he’s not allergic to but not what is causing the reactions. I will ask them. The specialist told me adding food back is very tedious and can take a long time.
As far as I have been told, the blood test they did on my dog is not very respected. Maybe a waste of money, totally wrong.

Some of the other allergy testing, like for food mites and dust mites, I think are believed to be more accurate. Has your dog been tested for those allergies? Because if that's the cause then you're wasting a lot of time and effort on the food
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32,588 Posts
Blood test for food isn't accurate. Heska results state this at the bottom. They would probably want to do a scratch test.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
543 Posts
What I did was make a list of all the foods I'd had my dog on. I wrote down the ingredients to see what they all had in common. Then found a food that didn't contain those things. Example, chicken, sweet potatoes, peas, fish, etc. I found one of my dogs doesn't do well on chicken, white or sweet potatoes or peas. Since you now have an LID food your dog does well on look at the ingredients. Look for other foods with similar ingredients/same protein. There is no reason you can't feed raw. Just don't feed the protein your dog has issues with. And there's always the possibility that the protein they have an issue with won't bother them in the raw state vs cooked or highly processed into kibble.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,331 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I got more information to share. They test food allergies first with a LID, then going back to the previous food to see if the allergies return. If they do, it’s back to the LID with one ingredient added at a time. All meat must be well cooked because cooking changes the protein and can make it less of an allergen. So, a protein allergic dog should not be fed raw. It takes three weeks to test each individual food, so if you want to go back to say Fromm, with 20 ingredients, it can take 60 weeks to run through each ingredient separately. I don’t have all the information but I’m guessing most people only test main ingredients in prepared foods. I’m thinking if he can eat cooked foods, I will probably end up cooking for him and adding supplements to make up what he is missing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,304 Posts
Commercial LID diets that you can buy at any pet food supply are only partially reliable. Research testing on them a while back found every brand they tested was contaminated with traces of ingredients not on the label because they don't clean out the extrusion equipment in between the runs of food -- so whatever was in the prior batch can slip into the LID batch. For some dogs, it's small enough to not trigger a reaction. For others, it does. Either way, it makes it hard to do reliable elimination diets. If the LID food fails, is it because the dog is allergic to one of its ingredients, or contamination? There's no way to know for sure.

This is why vets generally use RX hydrolyzed protein diets when they're doing an elimination diet for a suspected protein allergy.

They say you have to feed the same food for 6-8 weeks per food to this properly. No treats that have different ingredients, and no supplements that could be allergens either...the vet's instructions are very strict.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,331 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
That is what they told me. I’m using RC novel protein, and slowly testing other foods. The other problem I found by reading labels is that foods made in other countries that are supposedly LID diets, like rabbit, also include chicken. So it’s very important to read labels and also realize that they can make the food you want in the same equipment as proteins you don’t want. That is why I may end up making my own food.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32,588 Posts
@LuvShepherds - there is a dietitian in Texas. I think Jane has her name. I would not recommend that woman in Canada after seeing her lack of professionalism and knowledge in how she treated my friend.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,331 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thank you. Although I’m going to use the allergist to help us test for now, and then I will probably just read up and do the rest myself. Ultimately, I need to understand what I’m doing and not rely on someone else. I’m a little leery of using a stranger on the internet, even if they are very good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32,588 Posts
Thank you. Although I’m going to use the allergist to help us test for now, and then I will probably just read up and do the rest myself. Ultimately, I need to understand what I’m doing and not rely on someone else. I’m a little leery of using a stranger on the internet, even if they are very good.
I get that for sure! It's not really brain surgery, just make sure to follow AAFCO guidelines with vitamins/minerals and find clean sources of food.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,331 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I get that for sure! It's not really brain surgery, just make sure to follow AAFCO guidelines with vitamins/minerals and find clean sources of food.
If he is extremely sensitive to foods, and any supplements include those foods, he could show allergic reactions to that. But I can’t run to a specialist every few weeks, so I absolutely must figure it out myself. The things we become experts in for our dogs!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32,588 Posts
Not supplements. If you make your own, you need to have the correct amounts of vitamins/minerals in it. Iodine, zinc, copper, etc.

You should be able to work with a legit dietitian to formulate a balanced diet with limited ingredients. And it can be done online. Do you have a teaching hospital near you? Cornell has this offered.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32,588 Posts
That’s why I prefer to buy supplements. I don’t want to make any mistakes.
I don't understand. Are you going to have a diet formulated with the proper vitamins/minerals added? If you make your own diet, the vitamins/min. will vary depending on what is in food.

I have a spreadsheet with all the required nutrients entered and if I change one thing, the whole thing has to be rebalanced. I'm not fanatical about it but I've spent a lot of time on it to originally figure it out.
 
1 - 20 of 35 Posts
Top