German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
916 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a 9 1/2 yr. old male (neutered) GSD. For the past 4 years he has been an "only dog". I have never had any real problems with him, but I am currently fostering a male husky who is not neutered, and life has gotten seriously disprupted.

Let me first say the husky is not aggressive, and 95% of the time respects that fact that my dog wants him nowhere close to him. However, the husky cannot even walk past without my GSD giving out the most awful snarls and bearing teeth. The GSD does not actively go after the husky, but just obvioulsy hates him.

I do not want my own dog to be miserable, but to make a long story short...this husky is NOT going to a shelter here.

How can I get my GSD to accept that this dog is going to be here for a while and stop being so hateful?

I am really afraid a dog fight may occur.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
16,941 Posts
As above. Unfortunately, you cannot "make" your GSD like the husky. This will be a management issue. It is a pain, but many multi-dog households manage conflicting dogs by crating and rotating them.

I'm sure you already do this, but don't forget to spend a lot of one-on-one time with your GSD, so he knows that he is still #1 in your eyes. Enforce his Alpha position over the husky by feeding him first and tending to his needs first. Some people make the mistake of trying to show the old dog that the new dog is an important member of the family and deserving of respect by giving the new dog Alpha priviledges. This only builds resentment in the old dog, and validates their view that the new dog is a threat to their position in the pack.

So Alpha dog priviledges to your GSD, lots of bonding and one-on-one attention, and separating and managing the comings and goings of the dogs to keep harmony and peace.

Great that you are comited to your foster. No one is suggesting that he should be returned to the shelter. Both dogs will be happier if they don't have to worry about the other, even if it means crating, or confining them to different parts of the house.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,520 Posts
Since you are fostering (for a rescue?), I would exchange the male foster for a female dog or give up fostering altogether if it doesn't work out.
No point in creating dog aggressive dogs, bc your dog doesn't like other dogs (and sooner or later he's going to get a chance to attack).

I would also get your GSD checked by a vet, since his grumpiness can be a sign of pain. Considering his age he could have arthritis etc. and getting him on some meds or supplements could make a huge difference in his behavior.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,184 Posts
Originally Posted By: Castlemaidyou cannot "make" your GSD like the husky.
Actually, with patience, care, and work, it is possible. You have to decide if it's worth the time invested, though. There are various approaches, but basically, you'll combine desensitization and positive association. If you're familiar with that, give it a try. If not, or you'd like to know what has worked for us, let me know. If you expect to have the two dogs for at least several weeks, I'd recommend working on it - it may help them with other dogs, and allow you to relax a little. Even if it's only short term, it might work quickly in some cases (especially if both dogs are obedience trained).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,184 Posts
I don't mean to overlook possible health problems in the older, grumpy dog. Even if that's part of the problem, desensitization & positive association can help, but you may not push it as far.

And, of course, crate, separate, rotate, etc., as described by others, at least until the dogs definitely are relaxed and/or happy in each other's presence. Even then, you may need to continue to crate/rotate, but not separate.

Originally Posted By: CastlemaidSo Alpha dog priviledges to your GSD, lots of bonding and one-on-one attention, and separating and managing the comings and goings of the dogs to keep harmony and peace.
--- That has helped us, too.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,415 Posts
You did not mention how long you had the Husky. I do foster work, and in two cases there has been aggression, baring of teeth, etc. One instigated by my permanent dog, the other by the rescue.

In both cases, the rescues and my dog, Timber eventually settled. I do have barriers which I place in home to keep them apart for a bit.

I am wondering why the male husky is not neutered. In my neck of the woods, both the rescue groups and humane societies would require neutering.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
916 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thank you all for your input. I basically have been doing just what you all said...separate and rotate.

To clear up some of the confusion...I have only had the husky for 9 days. He is not from a legit "rescue"...I actually saved him from the streets. That is why he isn't neutered (but he will be next Wednesday!!!) He is already housebroken and has his basic manners as far as training. The husky has a badly mangled front leg from an old injury, and has no control over it. He cannot even go for walks with us due to it slamming the ground and bleeding badly. He is on a so-called waiting list for a husky rescue...until there is room I am going to fix him up...meaning vaccinations/neuter/heartwom/flea/tick prevention, and a possible ampuation depending on what the vet says is best.

My GSD is a former Schutzhund dog (and still very full of drive). He had a TPLO (knee repair) at age 4, and I am certain a bit arthritis has something to do with the grumpiness. He is on Nupro daily and Rimadyl as needed.

The part I don't get is that my GSD has been very well socialized. He is even the "demo" dog at obedience classes since he never has shown aggression toward other dogs. I suppose having one in the house is a whole different story. However, I have fostered before with no problem, and he has other male "friends" that he hangs out with just fine.

I think he is just older, set in his routine and ways, and does NOT want to play and be sniffed. I will continue with the rotating and hopefully he will relax, and hopefully a resuce will have room soon if I can't find a home for the husky as good as he has it here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,184 Posts
Taking them for walks together might have been a nice introduction, but it doesn't sound as if that's an option. Have you thought about letting them get to know each other in some other way in neutral territory, before expecting your dog to accept the other? Of course, if the rescued dog is going to be gone soon, it may be simpler to just keep them separate.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,415 Posts
First, I suspect all of us appreciate your taking on the husky. The so-called aggressive dogs I have adopted all came from a relaible shelter or rescue group, but nonetheless, it did take perhaps five days or so for the dogs to get along.

Regarding your GSD I wish I could be more helpful. Mine is generally protective/aggressive toward new dogs or strangers. But the dog gets pass that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,520 Posts
Your GSD will get familar with the smell of the Husky and hopefully tolerate him eventually. I would maybe re-introduce them through the gated areas inside the house for some time- one dog on each side (while supervised)- so that they can see/sniff each other, get used to each other and you still have the opportunity to intervene should the GSD flip out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
916 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
I appreciate all the tips. I think we are making progress. I do not think my GSD will ever "love" the husky, but we are all hanging out together peacefully for the most part. They do fine sleeping at night in the house now, and will go out together in the a.m. and just sit and watch squirrels. I will never leave them alone, but while I am around, I think we will manage for a while...even though it is a pain sometimes.

I am paying special attention to make sure my GSD gets his usual exercise and lovin'.

I just hate the husly can't really do much with him bad leg. It's really pitiful. I know he has energy to get out, but he can't even chase a ball across grass more than 3 times without that foot bleeding everywhere.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top