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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Her vet trimmed her nails when she was under sedation without asking me, and trimmed them much shorter than what I usually do. When I got her back from the clinic she had blood stains on three of her legs. I was busy worrying about her bloody stools so did not ask further when the vet said “BTW we trimmed her nails for you and we do not charge for it.”
The first thing I noticed was she suddenly developed separation anxieties when being left in the car. She used to be quiet when I told her to wait. Now I still can trust her to not jump out of the window but she screams when I am heading to the grocery store. I thought it was because of the sedation trauma itself.
Yesterday I tried to trim her nails. After some belly rubs I trimmed her right paw. No bleeding, but she started to panic when I proceeded to the left paw, and gave me fear-based bites (no harm done).
Long story short I booked a refresher session with her trainer on Dec 14th, am changing her vet, and started to read this book:
I do not intend to rely on this forum to cure her trauma, but I feel disappointed and need some advices on selecting a new vet. It was an emergency visit so it was not her regular vet who trimmed her but an associate vet (I think the clinic has her as their emergency vet). I was already planning on getting a holistic vet but wanted to keep the current clinic because they are skilled in surgeries and paperworks. I do not trust the emergency vet within 10 minutes driving and I was happy when found this clinic so that I would have the second choice when Idun has emergencies.
 

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It’s very common for vets to trim nails while the dog is under sedation. Mine always do. Sometimes it’s free but the last time there was a charge. If your dog was asleep, she doesn’t know they trimmed her nails. She may be anxious for other reasons. If it’s a good vet and you leave because of nail trimming by a temporary replacement who may not be there anymore, you might not find a better vet. There is a vet shortage and some practices don’t have room for new clients. Before switching make sure you can find another vet first.

My female had a tooth pulled and was very groggy for the rest of the day due to the anesthesia. She also seemed scared. I would guess your dog was scared by that more than the procedure itself. She may not have felt well either due to abdominal discomfort.

I use a fear free vet so even if they trim nails when my dogs are awake, which they do, they use their extra care methods. Every visit my male gets is 40 minutes they can work slowly with him. Maggie has a list of fear free vets.
 

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So, were her nails too long and that's why the vet did them a good bit shorter? Owners aren't always good at keeping them trimmed because of fear of hurting the dog. That's why I use a dremel ... for my peace of mind!
 

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Personally I'd be pissed if my dog came home with 3 out of 4 bloodied paws. Probably even more so given the fact that under sedation they could have taken the extra care to prevent that from happening. Also best to do this activity on a regular basis so that the nails never get too long. With our dog who is 18 mos old I've noticed that every 2 months seems to be a great time to take a bit of the fronts. He gets plenty of outdoor exercise so the hind ones can go longer.
 

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Personally I'd be pissed if my dog came home with 3 out of 4 bloodied paws. Probably even more so given the fact that under sedation they could have taken the extra care to prevent that from happening. Also best to do this activity on a regular basis so that the nails never get too long. With our dog who is 18 mos old I've noticed that every 2 months seems to be a great time to take a bit of the fronts. He gets plenty of outdoor exercise so the hind ones can go longer.
well, that may not have been their intent. since the quick grows along with the nail, it’s not uncommon when a dog has overgrown nails to cut them back to an appropriate length, regardless of where the quick is, in order to force the quick back. i tend to take full advantage of these opportunities of sedation. a cauterizer tool is typically used to stop the bleeding. i only get annoyed when they don’t take the extra minute or so to wipe the excess blood before sending them home. most recently it was just a couple of tiny smudges.

…..but i’m with Luvs, i doubt it was the nail trim that’s causing these reactions.
 

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My cat's nails were clipped during her spay surgery. She couldn't climb a tree to avoid a dog as a result soon after. Nothing happened but I learned from that and would have mentioned "do not cut nails" on her next surgery sheet if she needed surgery for some reason. Same with surgery for a male dog. I always write "do not neuter!" on the surgery sheet for a male. A vet tech mentioned "but it's so tempting!" So to me that means it's a good idea to be pro active.
 

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well, that may not have been their intent. since the quick grows along with the nail, it’s not uncommon when a dog has overgrown nails to cut them back to an appropriate length, regardless of where the quick is, in order to force the quick back. i tend to take full advantage of these opportunities of sedation. a cauterizer tool is typically used to stop the bleeding. i only get annoyed when they don’t take the extra minute or so to wipe the excess blood before sending them home. most recently it was just a couple of tiny smudges.

…..but i’m with Luvs, i doubt it was the nail trim that’s causing these reactions.
All of this! 100%!

Did it all the time with rescues.

Tons of dogs have weird reactions to anesthesia or sedation. They get all spooky and weird. It's a thing. Ignore it. Actually ignore it. Treat her exactly as you would any other time she disobeys or acts up.
 

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All of this! 100%!

Did it all the time with rescues.

Tons of dogs have weird reactions to anesthesia or sedation. They get all spooky and weird. It's a thing. Ignore it. Actually ignore it. Treat her exactly as you would any other time she disobeys or acts up.
I agree. However, IMO vets should offer it before surgery and not do this without consent. My current vet has us check boxes for services like that
 

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Her vet trimmed her nails when she was under sedation without asking me, and trimmed them much shorter than what I usually do. When I got her back from the clinic she had blood stains on three of her legs. I was busy worrying about her bloody stools so did not ask further when the vet said “BTW we trimmed her nails for you and we do not charge for it.”
The first thing I noticed was she suddenly developed separation anxieties when being left in the car. She used to be quiet when I told her to wait. Now I still can trust her to not jump out of the window but she screams when I am heading to the grocery store. I thought it was because of the sedation trauma itself.
Yesterday I tried to trim her nails. After some belly rubs I trimmed her right paw. No bleeding, but she started to panic when I proceeded to the left paw, and gave me fear-based bites (no harm done).
Long story short I booked a refresher session with her trainer on Dec 14th, am changing her vet, and started to read this book:
I do not intend to rely on this forum to cure her trauma, but I feel disappointed and need some advices on selecting a new vet. It was an emergency visit so it was not her regular vet who trimmed her but an associate vet (I think the clinic has her as their emergency vet). I was already planning on getting a holistic vet but wanted to keep the current clinic because they are skilled in surgeries and paperworks. I do not trust the emergency vet within 10 minutes driving and I was happy when found this clinic so that I would have the second choice when Idun has emergencies.
First and foremost, NEVER leave your German Shepherd Dog (GSD) unattended in a vehicle! I groom my own dog; but, when it comes to trimming my GSD's nails, I go to the same groomer (every month) who uses a dremel. (GSD's like familiar routines!) My GSD is less afraid because he knows the groomer by name and loves his groomer! The dremel rounds the corners of the dog's nails which prevents the nails from snagging or catching when jumping and running. Regarding bloody stools; it is very scary and upsetting and can require vet intervention. I stayed up all night once and gave my GSD water with an eyedropper to keep him hydrated. The next few days, a stool sample came back normal and he was digesting food normally. Everything was okay; Thank God!
 

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well, that may not have been their intent. since the quick grows along with the nail, it’s not uncommon when a dog has overgrown nails to cut them back to an appropriate length, regardless of where the quick is, in order to force the quick back.
I'm surprised you are assuming that the poster's GSD had overgrown nails necessitating drastic trimming to force back the quick. Is that what the vet told the poster??? We have two friends who are vets getting ready to retire. They are also a great resource for us so we sometimes call or send emails asking whenever we have any serious concerns about our own dog. They each have very successful practices but unfortunate for us are hundreds of miles away so we rely on our own local vet(s). Each of our friend vets have told us that over the past few years it has become increasingly difficult to find any competently trained vet techs to work for them. Often times they have poor work ethics and bounce from practice to practice. It is usually the techs that end up trimming the nails (yes, also while sedated).
I stand by my comment. I would be pissed if my dog came home bloodied from a nail trimming, especially one that I did not ask for.
 

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I'm surprised you are assuming that the poster's GSD had overgrown nails necessitating drastic trimming to force back the quick. Is that what the vet told the poster??? We have two friends who are vets getting ready to retire. They are also a great resource for us so we sometimes call or send emails asking whenever we have any serious concerns about our own dog. They each have very successful practices but unfortunate for us are hundreds of miles away so we rely on our own local vet(s). Each of our friend vets have told us that over the past few years it has become increasingly difficult to find any competently trained vet techs to work for them. Often times they have poor work ethics and bounce from practice to practice. It is usually the techs that end up trimming the nails (yes, also while sedated).
I stand by my comment. I would be pissed if my dog came home bloodied from a nail trimming, especially one that I did not ask for.
i bolded the sentence that i was responding to. i also used the words may have and never mentioned the OP or their dog specifically. instead, provided general information as to why the necessity of being so meticulously careful isn’t a priority while doing nails under sedation or an explanation in cases when the quick does need to be forced back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
It’s very common for vets to trim nails while the dog is under sedation. Mine always do. Sometimes it’s free but the last time there was a charge. If your dog was asleep, she doesn’t know they trimmed her nails. She may be anxious for other reasons. If it’s a good vet and you leave because of nail trimming by a temporary replacement who may not be there anymore, you might not find a better vet. There is a vet shortage and some practices don’t have room for new clients. Before switching make sure you can find another vet first.

My female had a tooth pulled and was very groggy for the rest of the day due to the anesthesia. She also seemed scared. I would guess your dog was scared by that more than the procedure itself. She may not have felt well either due to abdominal discomfort.

I use a fear free vet so even if they trim nails when my dogs are awake, which they do, they use their extra care methods. Every visit my male gets is 40 minutes they can work slowly with him. Maggie has a list of fear free vets.
I checked the website of this vet clinic before posting this thread and they do offer nail trimming service as you said. I agree, it is very important to keep current vet before I am sure that I found a new vet as skilled as them. There is also a possibility that a new vet does not know better than our current vet on treating anxious dogs. I will speak with her regular vet too, asking about what she thinks on Idun's increased anxiety. I have not called them yet because I do not want to start blaming them when I am not 100% reasonable.
Edit: I will ask Maggie for her list of fear free vets. It sounds great.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
So, were her nails too long and that's why the vet did them a good bit shorter? Owners aren't always good at keeping them trimmed because of fear of hurting the dog. That's why I use a dremel ... for my peace of mind!
Her nails were not too long because I trimmed them not long time ago. I like the idea of using a dremel. I will definitely try it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Personally I'd be pissed if my dog came home with 3 out of 4 bloodied paws. Probably even more so given the fact that under sedation they could have taken the extra care to prevent that from happening. Also best to do this activity on a regular basis so that the nails never get too long. With our dog who is 18 mos old I've noticed that every 2 months seems to be a great time to take a bit of the fronts. He gets plenty of outdoor exercise so the hind ones can go longer.
The first time (about 1.5 year ago) I trimmed her nails and caused bleeding on one of them, so I understand that this kind of accidents happens, but I feel like they could do a little better. My friend (who is a groomer) told me they should have put some sort of meds to stop bleeding before it got messy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
well, that may not have been their intent. since the quick grows along with the nail, it’s not uncommon when a dog has overgrown nails to cut them back to an appropriate length, regardless of where the quick is, in order to force the quick back. i tend to take full advantage of these opportunities of sedation. a cauterizer tool is typically used to stop the bleeding. i only get annoyed when they don’t take the extra minute or so to wipe the excess blood before sending them home. most recently it was just a couple of tiny smudges.

…..but i’m with Luvs, i doubt it was the nail trim that’s causing these reactions.
I will be happy to find out that her reaction was not caused by nail trimming because I like this clinic. I do not think they intend to do any harm either. My major complaint is that the vet did not ask me because she did a lot of trimming and no client complained about it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
My cat's nails were clipped during her spay surgery. She couldn't climb a tree to avoid a dog as a result soon after. Nothing happened but I learned from that and would have mentioned "do not cut nails" on her next surgery sheet if she needed surgery for some reason. Same with surgery for a male dog. I always write "do not neuter!" on the surgery sheet for a male. A vet tech mentioned "but it's so tempting!" So to me that means it's a good idea to be pro active.
Idun's nails were not too long before the emergency visit so the free service was not necessary either as the service for your cat's, but that could just be my opinion and they probably were too long for the vet. Luckily I do not need to write "do not spay" on her next surgery sheet because it is more complicated to perform but I will definitely ask every future vet to ask me before trimming and vaccination.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
All of this! 100%!

Did it all the time with rescues.

Tons of dogs have weird reactions to anesthesia or sedation. They get all spooky and weird. It's a thing. Ignore it. Actually ignore it. Treat her exactly as you would any other time she disobeys or acts up.
Many thanks for the advice. I know that sedation (especially sedated for the first time) can cause anxiety. Really hope it is only for short term.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
First and foremost, NEVER leave your German Shepherd Dog (GSD) unattended in a vehicle! I groom my own dog; but, when it comes to trimming my GSD's nails, I go to the same groomer (every month) who uses a dremel. (GSD's like familiar routines!) My GSD is less afraid because he knows the groomer by name and loves his groomer! The dremel rounds the corners of the dog's nails which prevents the nails from snagging or catching when jumping and running. Regarding bloody stools; it is very scary and upsetting and can require vet intervention. I stayed up all night once and gave my GSD water with an eyedropper to keep him hydrated. The next few days, a stool sample came back normal and he was digesting food normally. Everything was okay; Thank God!
I completely agree with you on having the same groomer for familiar routines. Idun's groomer also used a dremel but I do not know what brand she uses. I will ask and shop. Yes, the bloody stool was scary. I will definitely remember to keep Idun hydrated next time. It is a great advice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Sounds like her paw is sore from her response. Will she let you soak her paw in Epsom Salt? We use a Dremel to trim nails, you have to get the dog used to it and learn how to use it properly.
Using Epsom Salt For Swollen Dog Paw Infection - Dogsforest.com
Many thanks for the tips and link. It is the first time I have heard about soaking paws in Epsom Salt. I will try it tomorrow. I will shop for a dremel and learn to use it properly too.
 
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