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Hello guys,

I hope this new year started well for you and your family of humans and dogs ?

Two trainers that have seen my boy have told me that it is not necessary to cut his nails as they don’t touch the floor when he stands.

But they are really like 1 mm off the floor and they do click when he walks on concrete but yes don’t touch when he stands.

I have seen this YouTube video where it made the case that it is very bad not to cut the nails as this screws with posture and feet bones.

He hates having his nails cut so if I can do without this stress on him, I would rather do that.

Thanks you for your input.

Cheers

Mozi
 

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A dogs needs to have his nails cut about every two weeks. Failure to do so can result in lameness of the feet. You want your dog to have tight feet, not splayed. If he strenuously objects to cutting, try a grinder. Do these trainers that you mentioned have any clue that your dog's nails will continue to grow?
 

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Running on concrete keeps nails shorter but they do need to be cut. I had a dog who hated his nail trim I tried to avoid it at all costs. The nails got cracks in them and he developed a horrible infection in his nail bed. A vet who was good with him and his team helped me cut his nails. As he aged his nail growth slowed down. My dogs now I made sure I took the time to get them used of the dremel and clipper because it was something I would not want to go through again. They are young and really grow fast I do try to dremel them once a week mostly every two weeks.
 

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Never mind posture issues, I do not like the sound of clicking on hard surfaces so I trim regularly. My girl is due for a trimming herself.
Steel's feet are less than ideal in terms of tightness...so I've been trimming his back every week or two to help them firm up a bit - it seems to be doing a good job (or genetics are taking over). I use a grinder for the GSDs and clippers for the Shiba.


Editing to add - he'll hate it until you make it a regular thing. Much like bathing and leash/collar wearing, this is something that must be "desensitized."
 

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Depends on both thr owner and the dog. My Dane was impossible and we ended up cauterizing her nails to stop the problem. I never trimmed Sabs nails until she retired. No need. Bud needed his done once a month. Shadow trims her own.
Generally if my dogs nails are long they are not getting enough exercise.
I am fairly certain no one goes and catches all the wild canines to trim their nails.
 

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Sharp nails can cause injury to humans, just like sharp puppy teeth. I recently received a nasty wound to my lip, when I was caught off guard, while bending over to put a leash on my 5-1/2 month puppy. It took an hour to get the bleeding to stop.

I apparently missed a nail, during a recent trim effort. I have to trim her nails a few at a time, when she is tired/low energy. Sometimes, I distract her with with a favorite treat to chew on, while I sneak in a nail at a time.
 

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They don't vaccinate wild canines, clean their teeth, train or vet them either. Maybe people should stop that too.
My point was that a majority of dogs getting sufficient exercise do not require nail trims. The argument that it may cripple them is invalid.
We absolutely see wild canines dying or ill from disease. We do not see them crippled from overgrown nails.

But we can be silly if you like.
 

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I don't trim Jax's nails very often. They grind down with the amount of exercise he's getting. I trimmed them 2 days ago, but that was the first time in 2-3 months. I think it comes down to genetics and activity levels. My rottie mix pretty much never needs his trimmed. They stay short, he also won't let me touch them, so it's hard anyways.
 

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If I cut my dogs nails every two months they would be like talons and they get plenty of exercise maybe It is genetics or age. I have seen dogs nails so long it effected the way they walked. Long nails get easily get ripped out during a wild run and it is very painful for the dog.
 

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We didn’t trim nails on any of our dogs growing up, but they lived predominately outdoors. At their annual vet visits, the dewclaws were done until I learned how.

All of my personal dogs have been indoor dogs on hard floors (I hate the sound)... I do them whenever I hear them. About once a month for Keys.... more regularly for my old guy.

I train guide dogs (Labs)... their nails are trimmed pretty short during their intake for training during x rays when they’re knocked out. While kenneled and working daily for 3-6 months their nails are fine. Dewclaws are done before they are issued. Dogs in the field that we visit annually vary from every month to twice a year...... it really depends on the confirmation of the foot, activity level, surfaces and probably diet.

I fancy dobermans (childhood breed), so I like nice tight feet with short nails.
 

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If I cut my dogs nails every two months they would be like talons and they get plenty of exercise maybe It is genetics or age. I have seen dogs nails so long it effected the way they walked. Long nails get easily get ripped out during a wild run and it is very painful for the dog.
Genetics do play into it. But if you pay attention to the dogs you see with overgrown nails, they are generally out of shape and overweight.

I worked for a couple that had the top Dobe in Canada for a couple of years. They did road work with him, leading him behind the van, not only to keep him in peak condition but to keep his feet hard and his nails worn down.
Some of my fosters got nail trims on arrival but as I said, in general adequate exercise will keep nails in shape. If they get to long we get on the concrete.
Now if your dog won't be getting enough exercise then nails must be trimmed, but in general I like my dogs nails long enough to serve the natural function. They use them for traction, grip, balance and digging. They are there for a reason. I see just as many dogs with nails that are just little nubs and that is not right either.
 

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My dog is ok with me using a dremel on his nails, but hates nail clippers. When he was younger, he woke up while anaesthetised when the vet started to cut his nails. All Nitro's exercise is on grass, so I do his nails weekly.
 

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Genetics do play into it. But if you pay attention to the dogs you see with overgrown nails, they are generally out of shape and overweight.

I worked for a couple that had the top Dobe in Canada for a couple of years. They did road work with him, leading him behind the van, not only to keep him in peak condition but to keep his feet hard and his nails worn down.
Some of my fosters got nail trims on arrival but as I said, in general adequate exercise will keep nails in shape. If they get to long we get on the concrete.
Now if your dog won't be getting enough exercise then nails must be trimmed, but in general I like my dogs nails long enough to serve the natural function. They use them for traction, grip, balance and digging. They are there for a reason. I see just as many dogs with nails that are just little nubs and that is not right either.
This^ The claws are there for a reason and if kept too short, the dog risks injury as they lose traction, balance and grip. I prefer a nail a little too long and risk a broken nail than nails too short and risk a blown joint.

I may trim nails two to three times a year and my dogs spend most of their exercise time on soft, natural surfaces.
 

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Concrete roads are not the only place people exercise their dogs. Its very easy for a super active dogs who are intense runners on a daily basis to catch their nails on something and break or split. It’s another reason why I trim actually dremel my dogs nails weekly/biweekly and get cut up grass. I can’t see trimming the dogs nails as a bad thing and if you do it as a conscious effort the dogs will be more comfortable with it getting done. I have worked around dogs and have seen to many split and broken nails on all shapes and sizes- fat and fit. It is very painful
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Thank you for the feedback.

I guess the answer is somewhere in between. Here was my experience today.

I took Rex to a very reputable vet today where they have nurses do grooming. I had Rex for 3 months and he had his nails clipped once two months back and I was curious what she would say. She said you are welcome to come with me inside.

A French nurse took him :) and came back with him after 10 minutes or so. She said I could have waited and his nails were not too long and the way they grow and how his feet are makes him a dog where nail cutting is not really or often necessary (whatever that means given this thread!)

She said he was a bit rowdy and would not chill, so she used a muzzle, and she said he was calm after that. He came out very relaxed with her so I think the experience was ok for him. She said I can pass by in a month or two if I wanted and she said play with his feet more and more and he will get used to it more and more.

Cheers

Mozi
 

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Sounds like a plan! FWIW here's the rule that I learned from my father (army dog handler) and grandfather (multiple GSDs over the years): If you can hear the nails clicking when the dog walks on a hard surface, it's overdue for a trim.

You can train most dogs/puppies to accept nail trims. It takes time and lots of treats, but it is doable. It's part of an introduction to handling that I've always done with every puppy/adolescent that comes into the house. Not only does it make it easier for you to do certain things (nail trims, grooming), it's helpful in emergencies (e.g., dog has a badly cut paw which you need to bandage before heading to the vet) and it prepares the pup for the things it might encounter at the vet.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Is the dremmel easier for the dog to get used to?

I mean when I get close with the clipper, he moves his paw after about a second. I can only imagine it worse with a grinding sound and motion! I am about to order a dremmel from Amazon, but I feel that it might be worse than trying with a clipper.....
 
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