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Discussion Starter #1
So.. Today a pit puppy ran up to me and started jumping all over me. My dog is pretty protective if a dog jumps on me (she saw me get knocked over by a big dog once - the owner was nowhere in sight and it was a small town) but she usually just pushes the dog away from me with her paws or body. Today, she was growling. It wasn’t malicious, just a warning. She’s super sweet and never has done anything aggressively. She was ready to play with the dog a second later (I had her on leash) but she was still being vocal

She also has suddenly been vocal with her best dog friend. But very very gentle. It’s like she’s finding her voice. But with her size, she’s about 70 pounds and 26 inches at 9 months, I really don’t want her to growl while playing. What can I do to curb this behavior ASAP? Today I corrected her with a harsh NO, and we immediately went home.
 

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I would redirect not correct a puppy growling. She is coming into her teen years and finding her place. Sometimes when dogs are taught not to growl they no longer give you or other dogs that warning. They just react. Go to Leerburg.com and they have many great free articles you can read. Teaching dogs to focus on you and depend on you to handle the people and dogs they meet, to keep them safe, is huge in your relationship with your pup.
 

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I would redirect not correct a puppy growling. She is coming into her teen years and finding her place. Sometimes when dogs are taught not to growl they no longer give you or other dogs that warning. They just react. Go to Leerburg.com and they have many great free articles you can read. Teaching dogs to focus on you and depend on you to handle the people and dogs they meet, to keep them safe, is huge in your relationship with your pup.
Ok! Thank you. I’ll check out the site. What about when she does it in play? She’s not using it as a warning but just incessant “rawr” noises.
 

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Dogs communicate with their vocalizations and body language.It's perfectly normal and we humans can learn to understand how they are feeling and the meaning behind their repertiore of noises.It's especially important to recognize and respond to a warning growl.
 

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GSDs are a vocal breed, and the standard mandates reasonable aggression. So to expect a GSD to play without growling is similar, in my mind at least, to having a rabbit and expecting it not to hop! As they grow, every GSD I've ever been around has shown some aggression, some totally appropriate, some not so much and needing some guidance. But either way, a GSD that is always "sweet" is not expected, intended, or well bred IMHO!

Rather than leave immediately, teach her what is and is not appropriate...with reasonable limits that is! I mean, what you're saying is similar to, "how do I get my donkey to stop braying"...answer, you don't! Let her be vocal, but guide her as needed. Again, puppies grow up and will go through stages of being more or less "aggressive" (seemingly, because it really isn't aggression!). You have to learn your dog and what their triggers and personal limits are, that's it, in a nutshell. If you need help with that, find a good trainer to help!
 

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She is growing up. I am sorry she has had to protect herself when a very young baby. I wish that didn't happen. She is still very young to feel she needs to protect you. But 9 months, it's not out of the ball park.

I think if you don't want your puppy to act so protective, you need to be more assertive and confident and consistent, so your puppy looks to you when she is concerned.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
She is growing up. I am sorry she has had to protect herself when a very young baby. I wish that didn't happen. She is still very young to feel she needs to protect you. But 9 months, it's not out of the ball park.

I think if you don't want your puppy to act so protective, you need to be more assertive and confident and consistent, so your puppy looks to you when she is concerned.
Oh she does! ? she’s a mommy’s girl. She looks to me every 60 seconds on a walk. If I tell her something’s ok, she’s fine and won’t be protective. I still feel awful that she saw that though. Couldn’t be helped though. I’m 100 pounds and the dog off leash was bigger. If it was just her feeling protective, I’d be fine with it. But it’s mostly during playtime.
 

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GSDs are a vocal breed, and the standard mandates reasonable aggression. So to expect a GSD to play without growling is similar, in my mind at least, to having a rabbit and expecting it not to hop! As they grow, every GSD I've ever been around has shown some aggression, some totally appropriate, some not so much and needing some guidance. But either way, a GSD that is always "sweet" is not expected, intended, or well bred IMHO!

Rather than leave immediately, teach her what is and is not appropriate...with reasonable limits that is! I mean, what you're saying is similar to, "how do I get my donkey to stop braying"...answer, you don't! Let her be vocal, but guide her as needed. Again, puppies grow up and will go through stages of being more or less "aggressive" (seemingly, because it really isn't aggression!). You have to learn your dog and what their triggers and personal limits are, that's it, in a nutshell. If you need help with that, find a good trainer to help!
Hahaha!!!!! Sorry I should have clarified that I meant always sweet during playtime! She’s the best dog I’ve ever had. A monster though for sure. If it was just quiet vocalization, I’d be ok. But it’s the type of sound that is not acceptable. It makes people leave the vicinity because it sounds like a dog fight. Meanwhile she’s just gently biting and playing.

I guess she just has a set of pipes ?
 
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