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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I posted this on my introduction thread but thought it was interesting enough to have it's own thread...

Had a really cool Murph event on our walk this morning. I get up at 430am to teach a martial arts class that goes until 7. I usually take him on a walk when I get home, but this morning I had to attend to my full time job for a bit so it was 10, and 90 degrees, before I could walk Murph.
Since it was hotter I shortened the walk a bit. Once we got back on my street Murph grabbed the leash in his mouth and started leading me. Now, he never really pulls and always walks right at my heel. So I was curious to see what he was doing.


I didn't correct him and just stopped and asked what he was doing. He looked at me like I was an idiot and started whining. He didn't tug, just waited and whined.


I got this feeling that he was really trying to tell me something so I jogged the rest of the way home with him holding the leash all the way to the front door.


He bolted right for the water. I'm assuming he really wanted to get home because he was thirsty so he was hurrying me up. Crazy huh? He knows where home is, that there's water there, and figured out a way to communicate me without breaking rules.... That's something else.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I don't walk my dogs on pavement I can't walk barefoot on. Thanks for looking out for him though, that's very kind.
 

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I get that since I used to be a barefoot runner... I would run 10+ miles every day on the hot road in the middle of summer (90-100+F) and it didn't bother me one bit. My adult shepherd also accompanied me but he was older and he had been conditioned to it. When you are running quickly your feet are only on the ground for a second so you don't really feel it. Something to consider though is your puppies paws have likely not had time to adapt to these conditions since he is so young and not been exposed to surfaces like this frequently, unlike you who possibly have calloused feet and are used to walking on hard hot pavement. Keep in mind as well smaller organisms lose heat and heat up quicker than larger ones, so his risk for heat stroke is much higher than yours. I really would only walk him in the grass while he is so young and it is so hot outside.
BUT that wasn't the point of this post was it? :wink2:
What a smart little dude and how CUTE!!!! :wub:
Imagine how much smarter he is going to be when he is all grown up LOL!
 

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He is adorable, no doubt about that. Seems to be a bit of a thinker, you may grow to hate that, lol. It sucks when your dog is smarter then you, they give you that look like you may just be too dumb to breathe. I lived with one for 13 years who used to give me a look that strongly suggested I was the stupidest person alive.:blush:
 

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It seems to me, that you need to start a college fund for the Murph. This pup is already pulling you with his leach, when at this age, must dogs are trying to tear it up while playing. Enjoy your little one, he may be one of the very special ones...
 

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Many years ago, I remember reading a story about one of the very first Seeing Eye dogs, which was, of course, a German shepherd. His handler eventually was able to have surgery to restore his sight, but either his eyes were still less than perfect, or he'd been blind from such an early age that his brain had never learned how to interpret what he was now able to see.

He was trying to cross the road one day, and there was a float truck blocking the way. He just could not figure out what it was, or how to get around it.

His guide dog, who was now on just a regular leash, grabbed the leash in his teeth, and lead the man around the truck!

May your pup turn out to be as smart as that dog!
 

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a pup this age doesn't need a walk , especially in high temperatures on pavement .

judging heat with bare feet as a gauge falls short of what the dog is experiencing .

his body core is closer to the radiant heat .

lie down on the hot surface .

also a young dog or a young human child do not have good termoregulation - over heating is easy .

that pup would benefit from just hanging out in the yard , belly to cool grass , shade and a water supply
nearby

excess exercise is a risk to good orthopedic health -- over nutrition , over exercise

did your other dog not have a seizure? maybe heat and dehydration?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
a pup this age doesn't need a walk , especially in high temperatures on pavement .

judging heat with bare feet as a gauge falls short of what the dog is experiencing .

his body core is closer to the radiant heat .

lie down on the hot surface .

also a young dog or a young human child do not have good termoregulation - over heating is easy .

that pup would benefit from just hanging out in the yard , belly to cool grass , shade and a water supply
nearby

excess exercise is a risk to good orthopedic health -- over nutrition , over exercise

did your other dog not have a seizure? maybe heat and dehydration?
Hang on, I'll answer this when I get back from my wind sprint session with Murph. I just got some new Nikes I need to test out. He has a little trouble keeping up, but if you just drag him with the leash it adds resistance to my workout and makes me even more explosive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Many years ago, I remember reading a story about one of the very first Seeing Eye dogs, which was, of course, a German shepherd. His handler eventually was able to have surgery to restore his sight, but either his eyes were still less than perfect, or he'd been blind from such an early age that his brain had never learned how to interpret what he was now able to see.

He was trying to cross the road one day, and there was a float truck blocking the way. He just could not figure out what it was, or how to get around it.

His guide dog, who was now on just a regular leash, grabbed the leash in his teeth, and lead the man around the truck!

May your pup turn out to be as smart as that dog!
Very cool story! We walked down to the mailbox last night as a family. Me, my wife and both dogs. When we got back to my street he did the same thing, grabbed the leash in his mouth and tried to get me to the house. I didn't indulge it this time because I don't want him dragging me around to places he thinks we need to be, but its very interesting to observe.

Hey, BTW, what's a float truck?
 

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I'm not going to assume you don't know how to walk your pup (but do pass this info below to others, because I've seen some that truly are clueless about pups). I am amazed that our dogs understand the leash connects us. I've read from test studies that dogs just can't comprehend that ropes connect things. Well, maybe they didn't do well in the study but our many of our GSDs understand quite well. I've lived with a dog that was truly clueless and would walk on the far sides of poles while on leash. She never understood why I had to stop her and untangle the leash. Now, when walking my gal-dog, she makes a point of keeping the leash clear of poles and such. Dang smart dogs. I have had my big-boy take the leash at a turn around point in a walk. I think he was telling me that the walk was too short and he wasn't ready to turn back home yet.
 

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Carmspack, thank you for the info. I learn something new from every one of your posts. I live in the southwest US, and will consider your remarks when exercising the dogs I look after.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Ok check it out, I made a video of it today. Now, for the record our walks are only 20% pavement, the rest is caliche, red desert sand and grass. My neighborhood is connected by a network of alleys that are caliche/red dirt, and we're adjacent to a large open field that is mostly soft dirt/desert vegetation and also a nice park with grass. I know the grass won't be green enough for some of you, and I fully intend to bring that to the city's attention!
So, two things on this morning's 70 degree & overcast walk (it rained all night and we have a cold front). One, he was in heel as perfectly as an 8 week old puppy could be until A) We crossed the street to get to the park, then he ran until we got to the other side. and B) Until we got close to home and he took the leash in his mouth again, at which point I started taking video. So you'll see how close we were to home when he started this behavior.
Its so weird to me. This is also a completely different route than the one we were on yesterday when he did this. Could this just be a coincidence. If you watch the video I don't think he's trying to play tug, he legitimately seems like he's getting me to hurry home so he can get water. I dunno, what do you guys think?

 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Its weird right? Like, I'm not being dramatic and projecting behaviors I'd like to see? Notice how he drops the leash from his mouth when we're in the garage and I let go as well, as if he understands he's no longer guiding me. Anyway, also took some pics...





 

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My pup did this from a young age too. He's 15months now and I have him off the leash most of the time. I usually drape the leash around my neck. He loves to grab the leash hanging down in his mouth and walk right beside me.
 

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Murph is leading the way! What a cute little guy.


My pup this morning surprised me and grabbed his leash I was holding and yanked it and started to alligator roll. It was in protest of me brining him in the house, he wanted to hang out in the yard longer with his older brother. He lost that battle immediately. lol
 
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