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LUCKY
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Discussion Starter #21
you can try a matt splitter to try and remove the worst matts, but it may be more humane to just have him shaved. It may affect the coat quality that comes back, but will not hurt him health wise.
As I said above, how he looks is the least I care, if the shaving doesnot injure him& is humane way then I think it is best to get him shaved,
I hear lot of bad opinions on shaving this where I am frightened
 

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Shaving is not ideal but leaving your dog matted will certainly lead to skin/health issues. Sometimes you need to shave to “start over”.....

That said, i would try and exhaust all the other suggestions given before shaving him completely.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Shaving is not ideal but leaving your dog matted will certainly lead to skin/health issues. Sometimes you need to shave to “start over”.....

That said, i would try and exhaust all the other suggestions given before shaving him completely.
Yeah, I was thinking same, I have pretty much tried all the above but not helping much instead it is making him stressed & painful sometimes. Does shaving is as dangerous as said on internet like hair not growing back, heat strokes etc. I want to know the warning & tackle them.
 

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the hair will grow back..
but yes, you will need to protect and regulate his temperature until it does. from both heat and cold.
what is the temperature where you are now and for the next couple months?
 
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In this case it's possible that the matting could become a much bigger problem if fleas make a home inside those matte,skin infections will become a problem when dirt,moisture, and bacteria become trapped. If you aren't able to groom him yourself then eventually a vet will have to shave him anyway in order to treat him for medical reasons.
Dogs are shaved every day for surgeries,stitching up wounds, etc.The fur grows back. What you've read about never shaving a GSD is regarding shaving them down in hot weather like a poodle(for example).

It might take a few days,but you could do it yourself the way others have described- slowly and carefully. If you're not comfortable doing it yourself go to a vet.
 
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Discussion Starter #26
@Fodder It will be on average of 27c for next 2-3months, it is kinda end of rainy season over here, We don't have hard winters at all it will probably be around 25-35c at tops.
But summers ie, in April it may peak upto 37-45c
 

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Discussion Starter #27
In this case it's possible that the matting could become a much bigger problem if fleas make a home inside those matte,skin infections will become a problem when dirt,moisture, and bacteria become trapped. If you aren't able to groom him yourself then eventually a vet will have to shave him anyway in order to treat him for medical reasons.
Dogs are shaved every day for surgeries,stitching up wounds, etc.The fur grows back. What you've read about never shaving a GSD is regarding shaving them down in hot weather like a poodle(for example).

It might take a few days,but you could do it yourself the way others have described- slowly and carefully. If you're not comfortable doing it yourself go to a vet.
So it is better to shave him with these conditions? Is there any cautions I need to look for while trimming his hair using trimmer?
Sorry I am asking lot of questions here, this first time I am doing. I am really grateful for all the help I am getting over here 😊
 

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I don’t know what kind of clipper blades you have, but please don’t use one that is surgical short. You just need a blade that you can get UNDER the mats. A blade will not go THROUGH a mat. There are many videos on YouTube of double coated dogs being shaved, you might take a look at those if you are going to attempt it yourself.
 
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What Dogfaeries said ^^^.If you use clippers you could also use a comb under the matt between it and the skin,then clip the part on top of the comb.
 
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One way or another, those mats have to come off.

I ran a kennel for a number of years, and had a groomer on staff. There were many times when dogs HAD to be shaved right down to the skin due to mats. Often, the hair grew out again without any problems. Sometimes the undercoat will grow out faster than the top coat, spoiling both the appearance and the insulation value of the coat, that is why it's not recommended to shave double coated dogs in summer. Studies have shown the top coat does help keep the dog cooler in summer, so shaving actually makes the dog hotter.

Once the mats are dealt with, get yourself a decent rake for the coat, and make sure you get right down to the skin when brushing, to prevent the mats from forming again. The one I used looks like this: FURminator Grooming Rake, Updated Model: Amazon.ca: Pet Supplies
 

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Discussion Starter #32
One way or another, those mats have to come off.

I ran a kennel for a number of years, and had a groomer on staff. There were many times when dogs HAD to be shaved right down to the skin due to mats. Often, the hair grew out again without any problems. Sometimes the undercoat will grow out faster than the top coat, spoiling both the appearance and the insulation value of the coat, that is why it's not recommended to shave double coated dogs in summer. Studies have shown the top coat does help keep the dog cooler in summer, so shaving actually makes the dog hotter.

Once the mats are dealt with, get yourself a decent rake for the coat, and make sure you get right down to the skin when brushing, to prevent the mats from forming again. The one I used looks like this: FURminator Grooming Rake, Updated Model: Amazon.ca: Pet Supplies
Thanks @Sunsilver, this info was much needed. Is there anyway that we can avoid the undercoat growing faster than top layer? Even if it grows how to deal with it?
 

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Thanks @Sunsilver, this info was much needed. Is there anyway that we can avoid the undercoat growing faster than top layer? Even if it grows how to deal with it?
Nope, there is no way to control it.

I had 2 golden retrievers that came in every year to be shaved. They were farm dogs, and the long coats accumulated burs and dirt, which is why the owner had them shaved. The younger one's coat grew back just fine, and it had a nice full coat by spring. The older one's coat was a bit patchy, but that's to be expected - age affects the way a dog's coat grows. My 13 year old takes forever to shed her coat, while my young dog is done in a couple of weeks.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Nope, there is no way to control it.

I had 2 golden retrievers that came in every year to be shaved. They were farm dogs, and the long coats accumulated burs and dirt, which is why the owner had them shaved. The younger one's coat grew back just fine, and it had a nice full coat by spring. The older one's coat was a bit patchy, but that's to be expected - age affects the way a dog's coat grows. My 13 year old takes forever to shed her coat, while my young dog is done in a couple of weeks.
My dog is around 5years old, should we shave them again if they get the patchy coat? Is patchy coat bad for dogs health or it is just bad look of the dog ? If it is just looks I don't mind my dog looking funny I love him anyways. If it is health hazard I need to think twice to get to the conclusion
 

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I would NOT shave the dog. Scissors will work and you'll still have a 1/2 to 1 inch of hair length left. Good sharp hair cutting scissors will work. Chances are the mats are not all the way down to the skin so you should be able to accomplish dematting with just good sharp scissors.
Yes he will look bad for some months but if you keep up his grooming and brush and detangle every few days he should be OK.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
I guess I can't picture how bad the matting is. I would never shave a GSD
To give a rough idea about the matting,
I can't see his skin by splitting his hair just with hands, under his neck it just feels like fur ball, same near hind thighs, belly & near ears
 

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Discussion Starter #38
I would NOT shave the dog. Scissors will work and you'll still have a 1/2 to 1 inch of hair length left. Good sharp hair cutting scissors will work. Chances are the mats are not all the way down to the skin so you should be able to accomplish dematting with just good sharp scissors.
Yes he will look bad for some months but if you keep up his grooming and brush and detangle every few days he should be OK.
His undercoat is matted as well, i tried with scissors & cut the half inch & tried to comb his hair, but could not, the tangling starts from the skin
 

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His undercoat is matted as well, i tried with scissors & cut the half inch & tried to comb his hair, but could not, the tangling starts from the skin
I think you misunderstood what I was trying to say. Grab a mat and pull it gently away from the dog's skin. There should be a place to put scissors under the mat, next to the skin. Cut the mat by holding scissors parallel to skin/body. Keep scissors parallel to body. This should work if you're careful.
 

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I think you misunderstood what I was trying to say. Grab a mat and pull it gently away from the dog's skin. There should be a place to put scissors under the mat, next to the skin. Cut the mat by holding scissors parallel to skin/body. Keep scissors parallel to body. This should work if you're careful.

This is what I would do as well. I have a Yorkie that got some matting around the holidays when every groomer in my area was booked solid, it grew too long and every relative we saw wanted to rub his belly and behind his ears.

I would sit down with him every evening after work and work on one mat at a time. Parsed the knots with my fingers as much as I could first then sprayed conditioner and gently used a de-matting rake and comb like these:

The legs near his feet will probably hurt the most.

If there are too many and they are too thick to untangle, you definitely need to cut them out or shave your dog as it can start to cause skin infections.
 
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