German Shepherds Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m so livid right now I can’t think straight. Miley, our 1.5 yr old female, attacked Bailey, our 5yr old F Shepard mix. I had just come home, entered the yard where Miley came and greeted me. Bailey came out and then all **** broke lose. Bailey is slightly smaller with a bad hip so she couldn’t dominate. Miley did some damage to Bailey but not enough to warrant a vet visit.
Lately we’ve had to take all the bones away because Miley will become overly aggressive towards Bailey and steal her bone. She’s also started growling at Bailey when B eats despite the fact that there are two bowls.
assuming this is a behavorial issue, I don’t know where to start. This is my first GSD and maybe my last. Her behavior really freaked me out.
By the way, we’ve had Miley since she was 15 weeks.
Appreciate any advice. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Nadja- AKA the BooRoo
Joined
·
919 Posts
Welcome to the world of same sex aggression… Unfortunately there is rarely any way to “fix” this, only manage it using a crate and rotate routine. Once females start fighting they very rarely will be ok with each other again. I have to deal with this with my two dogs (both females) , it sucks sometimes but it keeps everyone safe (including humans). As the saying goes “Bitches mean Stitches” and boy do I wish I knew that before getting another female!
* just a little tip: it’s spelt Shepherd not shepard. Not trying to be nit picky just a little pet peeve of mine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,498 Posts
It's not the breed that's the problem. It's that you have two females in the same household. This is a problem regardless of the breed. They often become aggressive with each other, and Miley is reaching sexual maturity, the age when adolescent dogs often become aggressive because they are trying to find their place in the pack.

You may not be able to fix this. You may have to rehome Miley, or keep both dogs separated for the rest of their lives.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,510 Posts
Same sex aggression REALLY sucks. I inherited a mother and daughter Schipperke who were raised together from birth. When the daughter hit one year old, she attacked her mother. Vet visit for the daughter, these are not squabbles. They are now kept separate in the house or car but can be walked off property together but that’s it.
 

·
Registered
Krypto, Hiro and now Bernie who is a Golden Saint rescue
Joined
·
168 Posts
I'll get canceled for saying this, but from observation on the streets of Nepal, female dogs are just more aggressive than males, on a general basis. I walk here over 5km a day at least, past all sorts of packs and rogues. I try to approach each one with my GSD, and give them a kibble if they are having it. Hiro is ex-street, trained, and is a great dog for this experiment (he won't hurt a fly). By far, the number of rebuffs from Fs far exceeds the rebuffs from Ms. I should spreadsheet it for the exact percentages, but I am not that rigorous. So, what does that say for pets? Not sure if there is causation here, but on many other behavior aspects observed of Dog, there is a link between urban dogs living wild, and those of the pet variety (i.e. they have not changed much mentally over the centuries).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
I am sorry you witnessed a fight between your pups. I have gone through this and actually re homed one of my pups because of it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32,315 Posts
I think that females can be worst than males at SSA. Spaying a female doesn't make it any better. Whereas, neutering a male may, it depends. What to do about it? Never, ever leave them alone together. In fact, it is probably better not to leave them together unless you have two strong people who aren't afraid of separating them if it becomes necessary.

Right now I have Bear and Tinny together and Karma and Vera together, but mostly, I keep males with females. The only way I feel comfortable leaving bitches together if it is a mother daughter team, and at that, one where the dam is significantly older than the pup. Like Bear is 11 and Tinny is 3. Karma is almost 9 and Vera is 2. Perhaps it has a lot to do with the temperament of each, who is a natural alpha, beta, omega or middle of the road bitch. Once it happens though, it can become deadly between bitches. If you have kids, then it is best to rehome one of your girls because kids don't listen or think, and they may leave the bitches loose together, and who wants their kid to witness beloved pets trying to kill each other. Also, a kid might try to break up a fight and when bitches are fighting it is easy to get bit. They say bitches = stitches.

I am sorry you are going through this. I am less concerned with people having more than one puppy, or having littermates, than putting in a second female. Breeders can't ask every question of prospective buyers, but whenever you place a bitch pup, there is always the possibility that when the younger reaches sexual maturity, fighting may ensue. And a lot of that can be cause by resource guarding their person, or if their person is paying attention to what the dogs consider the lesser-bitch.

If there are no kids, there is always Crate and Rotate.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,498 Posts
The only way I feel comfortable leaving bitches together if it is a mother daughter team, and at that, one where the dam is significantly older than the pup.
Yeah, that doesn't always work. When my pup got to be about 8 months old, her mother attacked her. Fortunately, it was just a small nip, but we kept them separated after that. Then, one night, I didn't realize the mother was out in the dog yard when I turned my dog out to pee, as all the lights were out. I was the only one hurt, when one of the dogs crashed into my knee. Hospital, x-ray, crutches, knee brace. Not fun.

At least the dogs were okay.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thank you, everyone, for your thoughtful replies. I spoke with a couple of behavioralists yesterday. One basically said rehome or keep separated for the remainder of their lives (doesn’t seem practical). The other said training is possible but it’d require a lot of dedication and a lot of $$$.

Question: My best shot at rehoming the GSD is my BIL’s house. He owns Miley’s brother (6 months younger). Do y’all think that’s a viable option or would she be best in a home where she is the only pet? My older son has really bonded with her but understands the urgency of the issue. He’d prefer a home where he can visit, walk her, etc. If I can’t consider having her live with her brother, a foster home may be the only option. No good solutions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,526 Posts
Thank you, everyone, for your thoughtful replies. I spoke with a couple of behavioralists yesterday. One basically said rehome or keep separated for the remainder of their lives (doesn’t seem practical). The other said training is possible but it’d require a lot of dedication and a lot of $$$.

Question: My best shot at rehoming the GSD is my BIL’s house. He owns Miley’s brother (6 months younger). Do y’all think that’s a viable option or would she be best in a home where she is the only pet? My older son has really bonded with her but understands the urgency of the issue. He’d prefer a home where he can visit, walk her, etc. If I can’t consider having her live with her brother, a foster home may be the only option. No good solutions.
The BIL's house will likely work out fine! It's certainly worth a try!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,510 Posts
Bitches and stitches is so common yet not enough breeders consider it and not enough prospective owners know about it or research it. I have two males now, no issues.
I totally agree!
Reputable breeders make these kind of inquiries but as we all know, not all breeders are equal and not all buyers are honest.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top