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My dog never listens to me she is gone very wild lately I can't even let her off the leash and she don't wana come back to me she listens to none of my commands at all.. I though German shepherds are easy trained dogs and loyal or am I wrong she is 6 months old but I have been told she is a cross breed with either a husky a collie or something along the line like that so that why I'm thinking she is wild she may have different temperament to a pure bred shepherd she's getting very messy and out of control is there anything I can do anyone please her behaviour is terrible :( this is her in the links if it helps to determine if she's a cross breed which I think myself she is as of her wild behaviour I see people all the time walking there shepherds and there very calm and loyal....

https://plus.google.com/photos/photo/101817034580610862006/6252358214761399106?iem=4&gpawv=1&hl=en-IE


https://plus.google.com/photos/photo/101817034580610862006/6252357988981386242?iem=4&gpawv=1&hl=en-IE


https://plus.google.com/photos/photo/101817034580610862006/6252358402350347058?iem=4&gpawv=1&hl=en-IE



https://plus.google.com/photos/photo/101817034580610862006/6252358490206423058?iem=4&gpawv=1&hl=en-IE
 

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Hello there. Dog recall is and can be a very difficult thing to accomplish. Being that your pup is only six months old means there is still hope. I have had great luck with the lead and pull method, my name for it. Get a rope or a long leash and tie it to your pups collar. Let her walk away from you for a bit and begin playing. Whether it be outside or inside, you will do the same. Now after a little bit of playing, where you are sure she will most likely ignore you, say her name and the word "come", at the same time you pull her to you. When she arrives at your side or in front of you, treat her and praise her. Cheese works exceptionally well. Do his over and over again at greater distances until the pup comes instantly expecting her treat.

Hope his helps.
 

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I feel your pain! If she is a Husky GSD mix then all I will say is you can't let a Husky off leash unless you're in a fenced area. I say that with a bit of jest but they love to run...
 

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I agree with the use of a long line and a bit of leash pressure to direct the dog's recall if the dog displays any reluctance after your first issuance of the recall command but I would also take advantage of the times when you are basically a 100% sure of the dog recalling....the old "set up for success" routine. Choosing the moments when the rate of success is very high starts a trend and a base to build on....I also wouldn't waste your time on repeating the command if the dog doesn't abide the first time...setting this precedent of repeating the command is counterproductive and creates a weak recall at best that's why it is best to pick and choose the high percentage moments in the beginning.

FWIW, I sense a bit of frustration on your behalf ( understandably so ) but don't bring that mentality to your training sessions or let it evolve into that and most importantly when your dog recalls properly, only good happens.

Sounds like you have a very "spirited" full of "piss and vinegar" pup. Perhaps you can, through engagement, channel that energy towards you, making you the provider of what your pup is looking for.....and therefore the dog will keep it's attention on you rather than everything else out there.

Lots of other more knowledgeable trainers in this forum than me, hopefully they will give better advice and help you out.

Hang in there,

SuperG
 

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Does your dog know their name? I'm working extremely hard at teaching mine his. I toss a treat 3-6 feet. He goes and eats it. As soon as he's done I say d'jango in my best high pitch happy voice. He turns and I back up so he follows me and I treat.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hello there. Dog recall is and can be a very difficult thing to accomplish. Being that your pup is only six months old means there is still hope. I have had great luck with the lead and pull method, my name for it. Get a rope or a long leash and tie it to your pups collar. Let her walk away from you for a bit and begin playing. Whether it be outside or inside, you will do the same. Now after a little bit of playing, where you are sure she will most likely ignore you, say her name and the word "come", at the same time you pull her to you. When she arrives at your side or in front of you, treat her and praise her. Cheese works exceptionally well. Do his over and over again at greater distances until the pup comes instantly expecting her treat.

Hope his helps.
Thanks I will have to try this it is really frustrating that she's so wild
 

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I feel your pain! If she is a Husky GSD mix then all I will say is you can't let a Husky off leash unless you're in a fenced area. I say that with a bit of jest but they love to run...
Well I have been told she is a pure bred shepherd but I'm not sure people said her ears look a little on the small side and that she looks kinda like a cross breed but I'm not sure really to be honest
 

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I agree with the use of a long line and a bit of leash pressure to direct the dog's recall if the dog displays any reluctance after your first issuance of the recall command but I would also take advantage of the times when you are basically a 100% sure of the dog recalling....the old "set up for success" routine. Choosing the moments when the rate of success is very high starts a trend and a base to build on....I also wouldn't waste your time on repeating the command if the dog doesn't abide the first time...setting this precedent of repeating the command is counterproductive and creates a weak recall at best that's why it is best to pick and choose the high percentage moments in the beginning.

FWIW, I sense a bit of frustration on your behalf ( understandably so ) but don't bring that mentality to your training sessions or let it evolve into that and most importantly when your dog recalls properly, only good happens.

Sounds like you have a very "spirited" full of "piss and vinegar" pup. Perhaps you can, through engagement, channel that energy towards you, making you the provider of what your pup is looking for.....and therefore the dog will keep it's attention on you rather than everything else out there.

Lots of other more knowledgeable trainers in this forum than me, hopefully they will give better advice and help you out.

Hang in there,

SuperG
Yes it's so frustrating she has so much energy everyday she's a handful of a pup I'm gona maybe have to join some training classes with her I think she needs professional help before she gets worse and there won't be no going back from it
 

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Does your dog know their name? I'm working extremely hard at teaching mine his. I toss a treat 3-6 feet. He goes and eats it. As soon as he's done I say d'jango in my best high pitch happy voice. He turns and I back up so he follows me and I treat.
Yeah she knows her name but she just looks at me and continues doing what she's doing and don't listen to me the only way she will come to me is if I have a treat in my hand
 

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Definitely training classes. They will help both of you. One thing you might want to try to build engagement is to practice saying her name once or saying "watch" and as soon as she looks at you click (if you have a clicker) then treat. You can do this while watching TV. Practice it randomly or at the commercials. This really works to build engagement and getting her to focus on you. This is not something you do and then move on because "she knows it". It's all about building a framework. You can then add it to "sit" before releasing her for meals as is "sit", and once she does that add "watch" so that she has to look at you then you release her to eat. It may sound silly but it comes in very handy later when you are out and about and you need to pay attention to you, not the cat, the dog across the road, etc. It's just one small thing to add to your bag or resources.
 

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Some pups give me no hope until they hit 2 yo. That's my current 2.5 yo. That's with a lot of consistent training. (Meaning a few minutes several times a day.)

Other pups (my current eldest for example) come out of the box with focus and will to work.

So what can I say? Perserver, reward any and all good behavior, enjoy the craziness. It can be fun to look back on if challenging to get through.

And no class should turn you away if your dog is not PB. I've had a couple of muts and they did well in class. (I was unable to open the pics without creating an account with google).
 

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Welcome to having a teenage GSD ;)

Just a few thoughts...

Don't use your formal recall command to end fun things! Your pup will quickly associate "come" = "end of playtime". If you make whatever happens when she comes to you more fun then what she is doing then she is going to make darned sure she won't miss out the next time you call her. I also try to let my boy go back to what he was doing. So say we are hiking and he is sniffing a good sniff. I call him we play a quick game of tug them he gets to go right back to sniffing. 90% of the time I use his recall in that fashion.

You may want to consider using a different command to retrain your recall. The command you've been using may be "broken". As in your pup has learned she can get away with ignoring it or has associated it with a negative.

Another thing I have had good success with in regards to off leash training is teaching them to 'stay with me'. Basically what I do is hang out outside with my pup and let them wander around and do puppy things. I imagine a circle around me with a 4 foot radius. EVERY time the pup wanders into that radius I click, treat and verbally praise. Then let them go back to their thing. If the pup stays in the circle more - clicking and treating. I use pretty high value treats too. I did this everyday from 10 weeks on. I still do it now on potty breaks. Now I have a 10 month old who, when off leash, is rarely more then a few feet from me. When he does wonder off or gets left behind he quickly runs back to check in (and get rewarded)

Your pup is a looker! Very cute.
 

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Dogs are animals of repetition. I disagree with not repeating the command. Of you repeat over and over with rewards each time a feat is accomplished, your dog will eventually realize it is worth it's while to do what you're saying the first time. Quickly too!!
 

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Dogs are animals of repetition. I disagree with not repeating the command. Of you repeat over and over with rewards each time a feat is accomplished, your dog will eventually realize it is worth it's while to do what you're saying the first time. Quickly too!!
I'm curious if we are talking about the same thing ? In my experience repeating a command numerous times until the dog obeys creates stalling in many cases. This stalling then continues forward as part of the learned process via repetition just as you cited. The dog will then pick and choose when it wants to abide since it was conditioned this way due to repeating the command. I guess in the ab initio phase I have repeated a command but never rewarded until the task was completed.




SuperG
 

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Dogs are animals of repetition. I disagree with not repeating the command. Of you repeat over and over with rewards each time a feat is accomplished, your dog will eventually realize it is worth it's while to do what you're saying the first time. Quickly too!!
You do not want to nag your dog by repeating the same command over and over and not getting the results you are wanting. You are teaching your pup/dog to blow you off.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I think she could have some Japanese Akita or some Alaskan malamute in her as to why she is so wild and bad behaviour she don't seem to have the shepherds behaviour at all
 

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You do not want to nag your dog by repeating the same command over and over and not getting the results you are wanting. You are teaching your pup/dog to blow you off.
Agreed. You say Sit 50 times and reward when he finally decides to sit then you're instilling the idea that the dog can sit at his leisure. Not great when you're teaching recall and the dog is running into trouble.

I give my dog a few chances to get settled and focused but if he's not behaving the treat goes away and we try again in a few minutes. Obviously you have to know your dog, his personality, and motivations. Like if your training is going on too long and the dog is getting frustrated, I don't think it's appropriate to punish the dog for not having s human attention span. I do a very simple command that he knows well, give him a treat and end the session on a good note.
 
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