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Hi there. Just found this forum and I'm happy that I have
My dog is 2 and about 4months old. Unneutered male

Since over a year hes been getting occasional limps. Unable to put much pressure down on his leg and usually has it raised

I believe this is the third time he has gotten it where it last atleast a few days.

The first two times i have taken him to the vet.
The vet checks out the leg ive shown. maybe for a 1-2mins
he then puts him on the scale
he then gives him some kind of anti inflammatory pills (10pills, 1 a day).

my dog is fully better by the end of the cycle.
only problem is... for that check up and those 10 pills... im charged $105..

$105 for honestly 10 mins and 10 pills.. WHY? what kind of BS is that.


this is the third time around and i am definatly not inclined to pay $100.
nor a few hundred for xrays

After much reading, I have self diagnosed my dog with pano... or growing pains and am 99% sure of it.

Should i order some kind of pills?
Should he be given painkillers, like advil?
How much should i limit his exercise?
Do you think playing with him onsets this condition? Like throwing a ball for example, is high impact when he 'stops' at the end.

im looking into something here
Find Arthritis & Pain - Healthcare & Supplements in our Dogs Department at PetCareRx.com

anything there worthwhile?


:help:


heres a pic just in case
ImageShack® - Online Photo and Video Hosting

it doesnt bother him much... like he still wants to be his crazy active ol self. he still runs around outside like nothing.
last time he was literally walking on 3 legs and really didnt care

THANK YOU IN ADVANCED. sorry for draggin on to long.

:help:
 

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I don't know much about pano.

Could you get a second opinion from another vet?

Do you think it could be something like a torn ligament?
 

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Sounds like maybe the ball joint pops out of place and the pills take the agony away and time allows it to pop back in
 

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I would find a good ortho vet and have hips/elbows x-rays done. The ortho vet will be able to see if anything is going on jointwise and then advise you.
IF it is Panosteitis, vitamin C will help shorten the bouts of Pano. It reduces inflammation. Start with a daily dose of 500mg(human grade) and over a week up the daily dosage to 2000mg split between meals.
What are you feeding your dog?

Do not give him Advil.
Aspirin is ok, if the bouts are excruciating for him- but letting the dog self limit exercise is best.
 

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*** i am definatly not inclined to pay $100. nor a few hundred for xrays***

Wow, your poor dog??? Shell out the money for xrays to be sure. Throw in a Snap test for tick diseases too.

But first find a vet that will do the right diagnostics. A large part of the cost you are paying for is the anti-inflammatory (Rimadyl?). If the vet were really doing his job, he would also be requiring the recommended blood panel. But perhaps preserving liver function is too expensive too?
 

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*** i am definatly not inclined to pay $100. nor a few hundred for xrays***

Wow, your poor dog??? Shell out the money for xrays to be sure. Throw in a Snap test for tick diseases too.


Self-diagnosing in most cases, unless you have either experience or actual knowledge to fall back on, is a high risk decision. And frankly, $100 dollars per visit plus medication isn't that much, i mean think about how much human prescription painkillers cost...besides, if you were in pain and couldn't put pressure on your leg, would you self-diagnose yourself, then order medication online????

meh, just my 2 pence
 

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*** i am definatly not inclined to pay $100. nor a few hundred for xrays***

Wow, your poor dog??? Shell out the money for xrays to be sure. Throw in a Snap test for tick diseases too.

But first find a vet that will do the right diagnostics. A large part of the cost you are paying for is the anti-inflammatory (Rimadyl?). If the vet were really doing his job, he would also be requiring the recommended blood panel. But perhaps preserving liver function is too expensive too?
I agree with Lisa.
 

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pano usually moves from leg to leg..when your vet gave you the pain meds, they take away the pain so he feels better, you stop the meds, the pain returns.

I also agree with Lisa (and others)...FIND an orthopedic specialist take him for xrays and have a tick test run.

Part of owning a dog is realizing they do at some point, have medical issues, whether simple or serious, and it's also realizing diagnosis can be at times, NOT CHEAP.
 

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Well, I agree with a lot that has already been said. Your puppy is a bit old for Pano. I have to say that I am a bit surprised that your vet did not do any initial blood work and X-rays. I'm going to assume that you are not a trained vet therefore the self diagnosis is a bit risky.

You need to bite the bullet - your dog should be examined by an ortho vet - blood tests and X-ray exams.
Good luck :)
 

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Which leg is it? Front, rear or all legs sore at one time? Could it be just overuse from a particular activity?
 

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First, do NOT give your dog Ibuprofen or Acetomyophen under any name (Advil, Tylenol, Motrin, etc). These medications are toxic to your dog. You are not a veterinarian, so you cannot "order some pills" that would normally require a prescription (not legally anyway). You should not be diagnosing your dog at any rate. If you knew what was wrong with the dog, you wouldn't be writing to a breed related website asking for medical advice and treatment suggestions. Take your dog to the vet, follow the protocol he/she recommends, and pay the bill. If you don't want to return to the vet you've seen before, go elsewhere where you feel more comfortable, but don't make your dog suffer while you attempt to treat an ongoing problem without medical expertise. Part of that fee you don't want to pay is for the 12+ years of college your vet went to to earn his DVM. Trust it.
 

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Kushy, you are living up to your name if your experience with a 2+ year old GSD has not made you immune to vet bills. You have surely led a cushy life RE: your dog. I am brining my dog in today to have BB-sized lump checked out and if I get out of there for less than $100 I will be shocked.
 

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:thumbup:
First, do NOT give your dog Ibuprofen or Acetomyophen under any name (Advil, Tylenol, Motrin, etc). These medications are toxic to your dog. You are not a veterinarian, so you cannot "order some pills" that would normally require a prescription (not legally anyway). You should not be diagnosing your dog at any rate. If you knew what was wrong with the dog, you wouldn't be writing to a breed related website asking for medical advice and treatment suggestions. Take your dog to the vet, follow the protocol he/she recommends, and pay the bill. If you don't want to return to the vet you've seen before, go elsewhere where you feel more comfortable, but don't make your dog suffer while you attempt to treat an ongoing problem without medical expertise. Part of that fee you don't want to pay is for the 12+ years of college your vet went to to earn his DVM. Trust it.
 

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According to VetInfo:
Panosteitis is a spontaneously occurring lameness that usually occursin large breed dogs. German Shepherds seems to be particularly predisposedto this condition. Due to this, it is possible that the disease may havegenetic causes. Some veterinarians feel that this disease may be inducedor worsened by stress.

Affected dogs are usually in the 5 to 14 month age range and male dogsare more commonly infected than female dogs. The disease has been reportedin dogs as young as 2 months and can occur in young mature dogs. The lamenesstends to occur very suddenly, usually without a history of trauma or excessiveexercise. In most cases one or the other front leg is affected first andthen the problem tends to move around, making it appear that the lamenessis shifting from leg to leg. There are often periods of improvement andworsening of the symptoms in a cyclic manner. This makes evaluation oftreatment difficult since many dogs will spontaneously recover with orwithout treatment and then relapse.

X-rays usually reveal that the bones have greater density than is normallyfound. If pressure is applied over the long bones, pain is usually present.The X-ray signs do not always match the clinical signs.

In most cases, the worst pain lasts between one and two months but maypersist in a cyclic nature for up to a year. Analgesic medications likeaspirin can be be helpful. In severe cases, corticosteroids may providerelief.

Currently, a common rumor is that low protein, low calcium diets mayprevent this condition. It should be noted that the energy level of lowprotein/calcium diets is often lower as well. If this is the case, a puppywill eat much more of the diet in order to meet its energy needs, resultingin higher total calcium consumption. It may be preferable to feed a puppydiet and restrict total quantity to keep the dog lean than to use a lowprotein/low calcium adult dog food.

This condition is self limiting, meaning that it will eventually goaway, with or without treatment. Pain control can go a long way towardshelping your pet feel more comfortable and should be used, though.
 

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Panostetis CAN be diagnosed by x-ray. Get a diagnosis the right way, and then there are some possibilities to help your dog.

Diagnosing him by looking up dog limps on the internet will only get you there by accident. And you can cause more damage in the process.

There are so many reasons a dog might be limping, an injury to the bone, muscle/tendon injury, tick born disease, poor hip or elbow conformation, a disease in the muscle or bone, and others I am sure.

I hope that you can dig down deep within yourself and find some humanity so that you will shell out some diagnostic and treatment costs for your buddy. Or, find a rescue that is willing to take on a dog with an undiagnosed limp. Because the dog does not deserve to suffer. Veterinary care is part of your end of the deal. If you cannot provide this, then you need to not own a dog.
 

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I had a male who had severe boughts of pano until he was atleast 2.5 years old. So it can occur in older dogs, but it is usually not just ONE leg affected . The weird thing was, as soon as I neutered him, he never had another incident
 
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