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Discussion Starter #1
Ahhh. Today Riley really tested me and I'm not sure I reacted properly. I took the dogs out for there daily run in the open field we always go to. Well, Riley just immediately jumped out of the car without me giving the command first. This is the first time he's done this. Well, he would not come when I called him. At all, he looked at me like a kid might look at their parents and say "And what are you going to do if I don't?!!?" Well, I finally caught him and told him to sit down and stay. Oh, he did that for about 5 seconds and he ran off again and kept looking back like "What are you going to do?!!?" it took me about a good 5 minutes for him to actually come to me and he was cowering like he knew he did wrong. I didn't really scold him or anything because I've never had to deal with that in a dog. My last dog never did that. So what should have done to make it clear to him what he did was wrong and make sure it doesn't happen again?
 

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Well, you can't scold your dog from coming, even if it takes a while. My advice is to use the leash for the next month until it passes.

My Boaz is 11 and a half months old and has already passed through that stage, thank goodness! During that period, he would get a 15 foot long line unstead of his freedom.
 

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I would've leashed him up and worked him on lead. He wouldn't have gotten to run off lead that day, and likely not for quite some time after that. Back to daily training and lots of recall practice on a long training line so he learns that he can NEVER ignore the come command.

re: jumping out of the car - entering and exiting the vehicle on command is one of my pet peeves. I do NOT like dogs launching themselves out of a car. It's flat out dangerous. You could be on a road trip and the dog jumps out before you grab the leash (as happened here), etc. When mine jump out before they are told to do so, they are immediately given a verbal correction, a collar correction, and loaded instantly back up into the vehicle where they do a sit or down/stay until verbally released. I do not block their exit, I stand off to the side. Should they choose to exit again, I repeat the exercise as necessary. It doesn't take long for them to learn to stay put. Some dogs are more strong willed and less patient than others. But all can learn with practice.

Mine must also do a sit/stay before given the verbal command that they can get in the vehicle. I don't want them jumping up into the car everytime I open the door to get something. Dante still anticipates entering (tries to jump in everytime you open a door) but has the exit down pat. The others know the rules beautifully.
 

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I have a male that started acting like this recently. Well, he got put on a drag line for about a week. Everytime we went to get in the car he had to walk with me, when we arrived at the destination, he had to get out of the car and platz and chill for a sec, and then he stayed tethered to me while the rest of our dogs got to go have a good run. It was more work for me, but it has paid off. He is now the first to go sit by the car door, and waits patiently when we get to where we are going. I never got mad at him, just treated him like, oh hey, you're still next to me, what a bummer you don't get to run around with your brothers, blah blah, blah.
A little humility went a long way.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Yeah, the thing is I work with him and Apollo every morning on lead on the commands "Come, stay, lay and stay, blah blah blah" the usual and then go for our morning walks. It's usually an hour before dark that we go to this field to let the dogs run around and play.

I mean, will he understand when we go back and he is on the 20 foot lead that that is his "punishment" for not coming the day before?
 

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I mean, will he understand when we go back and he is on the 20 foot lead that that is his "punishment" for not coming the day before?
It's not "punishment." It's training. Your dog can not learn that he can ignore a come command. IMHO you did some damage by allowing him to repeatedly ignore you. All it takes is once or twice for a dog to realize they are faster than you and don't have to listen. Unfortunately hindsight is 20/20, but he should have been immediately leashed and it shouldn't have happened again. He needs to be on a long lead for quite awhile. If you want to allow some freedom get a 50, 100 foot line, as long as you want (pain to deal with a line that long if he's running around, but whatever floats your boat! ;) ) but point is keep him on lead. Call him, when he comes, reward and praise and let him go play for a bit. Then call him again, reward and praise.

If he DOESN'T come, immediately start reeling up the line and bring him in. do not repeat the command. One command, then reel him in like a fish if he ignores you. Don't punish him, just reel him in.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
re: jumping out of the car - entering and exiting the vehicle on command is one of my pet peeves. I do NOT like dogs launching themselves out of a car. It's flat out dangerous. You could be on a road trip and the dog jumps out before you grab the leash (as happened here), etc. When mine jump out before they are told to do so, they are immediately given a verbal correction, a collar correction, and loaded instantly back up into the vehicle where they do a sit or down/stay until verbally released. I do not block their exit, I stand off to the side. Should they choose to exit again, I repeat the exercise as necessary. It doesn't take long for them to learn to stay put. Some dogs are more strong willed and less patient than others. But all can learn with practice.

Mine must also do a sit/stay before given the verbal command that they can get in the vehicle. I don't want them jumping up into the car everytime I open the door to get something. Dante still anticipates entering (tries to jump in everytime you open a door) but has the exit down pat. The others know the rules beautifully.
Ever since I have been teaching him to not jump out of the car or jump into the car he has done it. Today was the first time since I started training that he just lost all impulse control. That's exactly what it was like too, that he just lost all the impulse control.

When we get in the car my command is "Load up" and he never gets in until I say it. Even after his mishap at the field today he didn't get in until I said load up.


When I say "Ever since I have been teaching him to not jump out of the car or jump into the car he has done it; I mean he he's waited until I give the command to get in or get out.
 

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It's not punishment, it just is. The only thing I do now with my formerly wayward male is put him on a platz before letting him run off with the gang. He doesn't think he's bad, he's just doing what has hopefully become a habit, which also reminds him that I'm there and may just call him back for some reason, maybe for a cookie, maybe a chest rub, whatever. But for a week solid he was my constant shadow, to where he quit even thinking about it, it just is the way it is. Fair is not really part of a dog's mind set, at least not the way we think about it. He's not mad that I'm treating him differently, actually after a bit he starts acting like it's where he SHOULD be. And when he gets privileges back, you can bet he checks in with me pretty regularly, either by coming over and getting a physical touch, or just by making eye contact from across the field. He gets praise for both.
I never leave my house without a 3ft lead clipped around my waist. My dogs don't get a second chance when they decide to act out in this way, I don't want to back my training up if I can help it.
 

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How old is Riley?

General rule for any kind of situation like this is

1. Manage the environment. Now you know you cannot trust him to listen, so he cannot be given the opportunity to disobey again. Personally I don't think he was testing you. Rather had a moment where his impulse control went out the window. The submissive behavior indicates that to me.

2. You are in a proofing stage. If you really feel he's solid on commands...Now he HAS to listen. So you'll have to set him up a little. Put him in situations where there's a good chance he will disobey. Then you have to be ready to issue a correction, and then a quick reward when he does listen.

3. I know this bit can be frustrating, but you have to be calm. No yelling. Just fair and firm. And be sure to praise when they do finally get it right!
 

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He's 8 months.
Well that's probably part of it. A good friend once told me about my male at that age "Just put a paper bag over his head...you'll like him better again in about a year" :)
 

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Ever since I have been teaching him to not jump out of the car or jump into the car he has done it. Today was the first time since I started training that he just lost all impulse control. That's exactly what it was like too, that he just lost all the impulse control.

When we get in the car my command is "Load up" and he never gets in until I say it. Even after his mishap at the field today he didn't get in until I said load up.


When I say "Ever since I have been teaching him to not jump out of the car or jump into the car he has done it; I mean he he's waited until I give the command to get in or get out.
I understand that. The point is, you have a pup. He's a big pup but he's still a pup and he's getting older, testing the limits and boundaries, seeing what he can get away with. He's not just going to "go with the program" anymore. He tested you and he WON today. You need to take him back to square one and keep at it, and next time he tests you he needs to not get away with it. He shouldn't have had the opportunity to jump out of the car and take off. When he did, he should have been recalled immediately and put on a leash and not allowed off leash. If he ignored the recall, he should have been walked down until he was caught and leashed.

Don't let there be a next time. puppies are like teenagers. They have no impluse control. What they have is TRAINING.;)
 
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