German Shepherds Forum banner

41 - 50 of 50 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,691 Posts
Will trade Engineering design work for raw food lol
All jokes aside Bartering is a really great idea! Although i wish i could find someone to give me raw food in exchange for anything really
when I fed raw, I got almost their entire diet for free. The only think I bought were my bone staples - chicken backs, turkey necks and leg quarters (I cut off the majority of the meat for making soup instead of going to the dogs).

Local hunters. Many people do their own butchering and, in some states it's legal for people to butcher for other hunters in their home. Bison, elk, moose, bear, duck and enough deer scraps to feed goodness knows how many people. They'd give me a call when they were going to have a busy day and I'd stop by the next day and I might get 10 lbs of meat or might get 50 lbs.

Local butcher gave me cast-off scraps that they would otherwise put into the rendering barrel. Goat, pork, beef, lamb, chicken, duck. easily 20-30 lbs a week in the fall.

Post in your local craigslist or online yardsale site before hunting/butchering season starts and ask for freezer burned meat.

ETA: almost forgot to say to check with local taxidermists. They can be a good source.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,691 Posts
Consider joining your local Kennel Club or training group. My dues are $10 a year. They have drop in obedience and rally classes, conformation classes and the occasional drop in agility class. The cost of drop in classes are $10 and generally last until everyone is finished. You get discounted prices on seminars and other events hosted by the club (though not entries into trials). We are currently hosting a handling seminar by Norma Smith. $100 for club members, $150 for non-members. Savings like that can really add up.

Volunteer to help at local club events and trials. You can learn a LOT by simply observing those in the ring and talking to people. You can pick up a lot of hints and tips by learning from the mistakes of others. I've spent many a lunch hour chatting about dogs with Pat Trotter and other well-known judges. I spent a day stewarding for Jimmy Moses last year. Watching him go over dogs and learning what he expected to see from the person handling the dog and how he handled the dogs for exams. Watching him handle the puppy classes, many of whom were a bit over-whelmed by the environment, was exceptional.

Also, many clubs offer special raffles for their workers. You get a ticket for every day or even 1/2 day you work. Plus, you can get some awesome things in the regular raffle as well. I've gotten an off-brand furminator, 3 traffic leads, dozens of cute dog themed t-shirts. A couple years ago, our club's big raffle item was a new tunnel for agility.

Don't buy dog specific items when the human equivalent is cheaper. For example, dog gates. In the pet section, they can be $15-20. Or get a baby gate for $5.

Train with friends. We get together a couple times a month at least and work dogs. The more experienced help the less experienced and it's always good to have multiple sets of eyes to see where you might be giving mixed signals.

I've exchanged photography work for training lessons. I've swapped dog sitting with friends. We take turns driving the carpool to various events.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,423 Posts
Discussion Starter #43
Hurry up and sign up for Fromm's email list if you haven't already, for a FREE small bag of food with other purchase (see screenshot thumbnail). This is a super way to get a few more pounds of food and/or try a new flavor, 5lb bags are worth at least $15, with some selling for $25.00 or more.

And of course if you fulfill this promotion's intent, your local rescue or shelter could win HUGE. :)
 

Attachments

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,423 Posts
Discussion Starter #45
Reminder to raw feeders ~ clear out your freezer, whole turkeys are about to hit the cheapest price point of the entire year!

There are lots of money saving blogs that list price comparisons across major chain stores, but they're all specific to geographic location. A few stores (like Target) have an add-on "Save $10.00 off a $50.00 food and beverage purchase" which will decrease your per-pound price even more.

Here's the official USDA run-down, if anyone is extra nerdy and curious what the average prices are. Hooray for us Midwesterners, it seems we may have access to some of the best deals... https://www.ams.usda.gov/mnreports/pywretailturkey.pdf

Sidenote, for label readers, don't forget to look at the salt content... some of the birds are pre-brined/heavily salted before freezing now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,331 Posts
This is an old thread I thought was worth revisiting and updating. My tips are:

A 3 gallon/12 litre empty plastic water cooler bottle make a great yard toy.
My vet's usual two suppliers for a medication for my dog were out of stock. She tried a compounding pharmacy, they are making it for her and they are cheaper.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,589 Posts
Good suggestion re compounding pharmacies, Dunkirk! In the U.S., one of the best-priced compounding pharmacies for pet meds is Wedgewood, in NJ (they ship nationwide). They won't sell directly to consumers, but you can ask your vet to price meds there and order for you. They can supply Doxycycline to treat HW or tick-disease infections at a small fraction of the cost of buying it from human pharmacies -- and they make a 400 mg. chicken-flavored wafer that makes dosing much easier.

https://www.wedgewoodpetrx.com/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
488 Posts
Old pants make great tug toys, cut one leg into lengthwise strips and braid, tie with a knot. Jeans are great for stronger teeth, a mix of jeans & track pants, or track pants for soft toys. So cheap & easy it doesn't matter if they don't last long. For supervised dog & human together play, not as a solo toy.
 
41 - 50 of 50 Posts
Top