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I think if you asked my dogs they would approve. We have the time and resources to spoil them rotten. On nice days they can be taken out by 3 people, so it's many many times a day. There is always someone home to do 'dog stuff' which they do like to do. Ride in the car? Sure, nothing else to do. Want a cookie? just ask. Throw the ball? Sure, why not.

okay, so maybe they don't get walked until their legs fall off but they get petted until our arms fall off. Training? Not so much, just the pleasures of being a dog. Laying in the sun on grass or getting brushed is more fun anyway...

We were looking for an adult, but no one seemed to notice Duke was a 90 lb puppy. So we cleaned carpets and mopped floors for a few months, they probably needed it anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
I saw a meme about old age once that said something to the effect of you know you're old when you start measuring life in how many dogs you have left! Lol!

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lol I'm loving that though it doesn't bode well for my longevity ;-)
 
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I saw a meme about old age once that said something to the effect of you know you're old when you start measuring life in how many dogs you have left! Lol!

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That was a rude awakening the day I realized that.... Up until then I always had the comfort of thinking to own this or that breed but not anymore.
 

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Assuming my health and physical condition remain in tact, my lifestyle and “household” are the same.... i think 75 is the absolute oldest i’d get a puppy. otherwise, i’d adopt dogs of an age that corresponds with mine or (to the best of my ability), my life expectancy. all of that said with GSD in mind. i have a couple of other breeds that interest me and may compliment my senior years better.
 

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Heck no, I'm not going to be "elderly" in 4 years. :) On the other hand a 30 year old could die in a car accident or get hit by a bus tomorrow. You never know what life holds. So long as someone knows what they are doing getting a GSD age shouldn't matter. Everyone should think about what will happen to their pets if something were to happen to them though. Make arrangements....
 

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It also depends on how smart the person is. For example, I have been wiped out three times by Jupiter when he was going for balls and just went through me. By pure luck, I wasn't injured, but if I were twenty years older... I would have been hospitalized for sure.

In other words, don't be dumb like me and be more careful when you're exercising your dog. An 80-lb fur missile can do some serious damage.
 

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This might seem strange but it was encouraged by a message in a different thread about having an "elderly parent" look after someone's GSD. Elderly being mid-60s.

I was a bit astonished, but then I realised that this is an important issue. If/when we think about getting a dog, we think about lots of stuff about the puppy... what breed, what colour, what training etc, but we don't think much about us.

When would you think you were too old to get a GSD? Or other breed?

At what age would you think it was irresponsible to bring a new puppy home?
I am 73 this year and my wife has reached the age of 53. We have three GSDs and she's active in GSD Rescue and has been for over twenty years. That said, we're kind of done getting any additional dogs, rescue or not. We're not as young as we used to be and GSD require us to have the ability to lift them whether by shear strength of by a harness to assist the dog when they're too old to get themselves out the door.

We've had issues with: a senior GSD who had Degenerative Myelopathy, another senior who required our help to get him out the door and down the ramp (we have one ramp going down the front four steps and one permanent ramp out the back door, another Rescue who had Hemangiosarcoma and needed help getting him outside, and a female who we got a custom cart to aid her in getting outside for walks, et cetera.


All of this was fine 20 years ago. But then my wife didn't have back/neck issues and I was in my early Fifties and more fit than I am now. Our "pack" are younger GSDs and I have nightmares thinking about how both they and us are going to age from here on out.

If you have a great support system, e.g. nearby "kids" who can drop whatever they're doing and give you a hand, that's one thing. But I would advise thinking ahead. Where are you going to be health-wise in 5-10 years and where is the GSD going to be in 5 years?

If you really want a GSD, you can always foster for one of the local rescues. God knows that all of the rescues are looking for competent fosters for their dogs as the number of fosters help the rescue bring in more GSDs.
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I choose my dogs from breeders that will back me up if I can not take care of them anymore. If something happens to me I cannot rely on my hubby's dog savvyness to find them a good home. So I have my dogs' breeders names and contact info posted on the fridge. Even the pet mice have somewhere to go (back to wildlife rehab 😱)
I hope with all my heart that I can always have a GSD.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
This really highlights some of my concerns. I'm 63 and despite a hip bursitis, I'm fairly fit. My husband is 55 and still fit and well, but works full-time. My breeder is fantastic and gives ongoing support to all of her "pups", but she's not getting any younger either. I have no doubt that she'd reclaim my pup but after that? At least my pup gives me a reason why I have to stay fit and active, because I don't want anything bad to happen to him.
 
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