German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 20 of 46 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,423 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
I'm having trouble getting the mats out behind Gandalfs ears! Is there any tips or tricks to getting them out easier? I've tried a couple different styles of brush to no avail... even one of those "demating combs" (https://www.amazon.com/Safari-W6116-De-matting-Comb/dp/B0002ARR2W/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1512398646&sr=8-3&keywords=dog+mat+brush) and I ended up nearly slicing my finger off lol and still didn't get the darn thing out! He doesn't get them anywhere else but behind those fluffy ears... he is a good sport and puts up with the yanking but I feel awful about it.
Thanks yall :smile2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,758 Posts
Is your dog actually a long hair? Mats are actually hairs that have fallen out entangled with rooted hairs. In other types of animals (angora rabbits) I got scissors and cut into the mat lengthwise, then take hold of the rooted hairs at the base and work the section loose with my fingers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,423 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Is your dog actually a long hair? Mats are actually hairs that have fallen out entangled with rooted hairs. In other types of animals (angora rabbits) I got scissors and cut into the mat lengthwise, then take hold of the rooted hairs at the base and work the section loose with my fingers
I'm not sure what he is technically considered; is it very long compared to my past two shepherds and it is so incredibly soft, feels softer than puppy fur. He is still young so i'm not sure if his coat will fill out even more (i've heard long coats take a while?). Here is a photo of him to get an idea... I'd hate to cut it all out since it might look funny lol. The hair behind his ears gets very curly, people stop and ask me if I take a curling iron to his hair :mad:. Is there a way once you get the mats out to prevent them? I brush behind his ears every day and he still gets them...
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,758 Posts
He looks like a beautiful white wolf.

If you brush him everyday and he still gets mats I guess there is no prevention. What about putting ladys hair conditioner there when you wash him?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,423 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
If you brush him everyday and he still gets mats I guess there is no prevention. What about putting ladys hair conditioner there when you wash him?
Thank you :). Never thought of that, will have to give it a try. Any idea how to get the darn things out that are there now though besides cutting them? I took him to the groomer a couple months ago and they somehow managed... I've been trying to avoid taking him there again since they're so expensive and the lady who groomed him said he was awful and howled the whole time. Which is pretty odd because when I bathe him at home he loves it and doesn't make a peep :thinking:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,758 Posts
Maybe the groomer can advise you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,253 Posts
I had a grooming business with my kennel for years. I didn't groom myself but I helped the groomer out, and learned a lot in the process. Dematting is very time-consuming and painful for the dog. I suggest you just cut them out, then make SURE you brush the area frequently when grooming the dog to keep them from coming back!

What type of brush are you using? For a long haired dog like that, you need to be using a rake with long teeth to get down to the roots of the hair and not just a slicker brush or furminator. If you have the right tools, the mats CAN be prevented!

Make sure your dog is fully dematted before bathing. Bathing makes the mats tighter and harder to remove. It's like when you wash wool - the fibers felt together.

This is the type of tool I use on my dogs for the areas that have really long hair, like the back of the hind legs: https://www.amazon.ca/FURminator-104012-Professional-Grooming-Rakes/dp/B0062Z0RPA/ref=pd_sim_199_1?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=0PHB31XZKA3NW498S679

(Although it's sold under the Furminator brand name, it is not really a furminator.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,814 Posts
If I brush Shelby frequently, she doesn't get matted. If I am a slacker, she mats. Often, I can work the mats out, with my fingers. If not, I just cut out the mat and brush the rest.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,253 Posts
Mats can be worked out with the fingers in the early stages. But the fact they are happening at all means you are not getting right down to the roots of the hair when you are brushing!

Many owners don't 'get' this -they think a once-over lightly with a slicker or furminator is going to do the job on a double-coated, medium length or long haired dog! And oh, the things I have seen as a result of this type of grooming! You would absolutely GAG at some of them!

A lady brought her collie in for grooming. She said her teenage daughter had been in charge of brushing it. Well, the girl obviously didn't realize that a dog needs to be brushed ALL OVER. Yes, even the parts you don't really want to think about...

The dog was so matted around its privates and anus that it was a wonder the poor thing could even poop OR pee...

Which reminds me- with a long haired dog like that, you likely should be doing a 'sanitary' clip on it around these areas with a pair of scissors, say, once every 6 to 8 weeks. You dog will thank you, and your house will likely smell better, too!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
646 Posts
Any idea how to get the darn things out that are there now though besides cutting them?
Do this ---V . I feel that'd be your best bet. I don't have experience doing it on a dog, but I've done it to my vacuum cleaner a lot, haha

Is your dog actually a long hair? Mats are actually hairs that have fallen out entangled with rooted hairs. In other types of animals (angora rabbits) I got scissors and cut into the mat lengthwise, then take hold of the rooted hairs at the base and work the section loose with my fingers
He'll look like he got a wonky haircut, but better than being matted. Then just keep up on the deep brushing and you should be good
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,806 Posts
For my long coat I use a comb around the ear area and groom often. I use a comb where the teeth are quite close together. It seems to do a better job then brushing especially in the ear area. I have also found the comb quite useful for grooming his whole body and removing dense undercoat. My guy seems to prefer it to brushing. You can remove the mats in the ear area without cutting by using the comb. Start at the ends and work your way down to the base of the hair. Always hold the hair below where you are combing tight between your fingers so the dog does not feel any pulling or tugging. It takes a bit of work but is an option instead of cutting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
852 Posts
I tend to clip away mats behind ears. Unless it is in the early stages, attempting to brush them out is just too painful. If you are brushing every day he should not be getting mats there. My GSD was a coatie. I brushed him a few times a week and never had an issue with mats behind the ears despite the fur being much softer.

I agree with Sunsliver. When brushing you need to brush from the root of the hair out to the tips. I get in a lot of dogs whose owner swear they brush them everyday and on the surface look okay, but are matted just below that. Look up line brushing. You also may not be using the correct brush for the job. These are what I like for long double coated breeds since the pins are long and reach down past the outer coat ti grab the undercoat which is what gets matted: https://www.cherrybrook.com/chris-christensen-long-pin-slicker-brushes/ I also never dry brush a med-long coated dog. This can damage the hair shaft making them want to grab onto each other and tangle up. I always use a detangling or dematting spray when brushing a dry coat. These sprays coat and smooth the hair shaft making brushing easier and help prevent matting. I never had to do a sanitary trim on my GSD, never had an issue with him being clean.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
217 Posts
Which reminds me- with a long haired dog like that, you likely should be doing a 'sanitary' clip on it around these areas with a pair of scissors, say, once every 6 to 8 weeks. You dog will thank you, and your house will likely smell better, too!
Yup do a lot of those with the shelties. Also have to trim those Grinch feet!

Love my greyhound comb for long double coated fur! Slickers don't really get down deep enough and they can burn the coat, I also don't really care for the furminator either (at least for long coats) its to easy to cut the guard hairs. Learn to line brush its your new best friend :grin2:

Summer was my worst for ear mats she has a very soft coat around her ears and that combined with the fact that when they play they would always bite around the neck area, I was always brushing out mats and yes occasionally cutting them out.

Cornstarch can help somewhat if the mats are not too tight, and as mentioned never bath a matted dog, it tightens them up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,423 Posts
Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
Mats can be worked out with the fingers in the early stages. But the fact they are happening at all means you are not getting right down to the roots of the hair when you are brushing!

Many owners don't 'get' this -they think a once-over lightly with a slicker or furminator is going to do the job on a double-coated, medium length or long haired dog! And oh, the things I have seen as a result of this type of grooming! You would absolutely GAG at some of them!

A lady brought her collie in for grooming. She said her teenage daughter had been in charge of brushing it. Well, the girl obviously didn't realize that a dog needs to be brushed ALL OVER. Yes, even the parts you don't really want to think about...

The dog was so matted around its privates and anus that it was a wonder the poor thing could even poop OR pee...

Which reminds me- with a long haired dog like that, you likely should be doing a 'sanitary' clip on it around these areas with a pair of scissors, say, once every 6 to 8 weeks. You dog will thank you, and your house will likely smell better, too!
Huh can't say we have any issues in the butt area, white and clean lol. And no smell at all or mats. I brush regularly all of him but struggle with the base of the ear because he hates it (barely tolerates it) and the angle makes it hard to get any brush in there. When I brush the ears they just tangle up worse as I go? They literally start floofing out and getting poofier and poofier!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,423 Posts
Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
I tend to clip away mats behind ears. Unless it is in the early stages, attempting to brush them out is just too painful. If you are brushing every day he should not be getting mats there. My GSD was a coatie. I brushed him a few times a week and never had an issue with mats behind the ears despite the fur being much softer.

I agree with Sunsliver. When brushing you need to brush from the root of the hair out to the tips. I get in a lot of dogs whose owner swear they brush them everyday and on the surface look okay, but are matted just below that. Look up line brushing. You also may not be using the correct brush for the job. These are what I like for long double coated breeds since the pins are long and reach down past the outer coat ti grab the undercoat which is what gets matted: https://www.cherrybrook.com/chris-christensen-long-pin-slicker-brushes/ I also never dry brush a med-long coated dog. This can damage the hair shaft making them want to grab onto each other and tangle up. I always use a detangling or dematting spray when brushing a dry coat. These sprays coat and smooth the hair shaft making brushing easier and help prevent matting. I never had to do a sanitary trim on my GSD, never had an issue with him being clean.
Thank you didn't know about the spray that might help. These are the brushes we have tried on his ears (have a rake too but only use it on his body) and that's how much hair I just got off one ear. It's insane it doesn't feel like fur at all more like a baby duck lol. After 30 minutes from brushing it turns into curls.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,423 Posts
Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Photo of what we're dealing with here lol. When he wakes up in the morning he has serious bed head... cracks me up :grin2: Any long pin slicker brushes that still work well but aren't so expensive? $60 is pretty steep right now we will have to save up but in the mean time we might need a better tool. Also what spray do you recommend? Cut out those few mats they weren't actually as big as I thought and only about 3 of them, you can't even tell :) !
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
241 Posts
Grab a paw brothers Tefelon coated greyhound comb off amazon for 11-14 bucks! I’m a groomer, have a LC Shepherd. Comb behind the ears, butt fluff, and sanitary every day and you’ll have no problems with mats. ;) Greyhound combs work a lot better than slickers in this case. If the mats aren’t too tight or close to the skin (smaller ones) it’ll comb out easily with that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,423 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Grab a paw brothers Tefelon coated greyhound comb off amazon for 11-14 bucks! I’m a groomer, have a LC Shepherd. Comb behind the ears, butt fluff, and sanitary every day and you’ll have no problems with mats. ;) Greyhound combs work a lot better than slickers in this case. If the mats aren’t too tight or close to the skin (smaller ones) it’ll comb out easily with that.
Thank you :smile2:!
 
1 - 20 of 46 Posts
Top